cosmopolitanism

a blog on English and cultures in a cosmopolitan world

Bibliography (I) like Ivins and Dubose thanks to Dubbyah


Links to my bibliography from A to Z:

A      B     C     D     E     F     G     H        I (this page)    J     K     L     

M     N     O     P       Q       R     S     T     U     V     W/X/Y/Z

Last update: 29 november 2012

(ICMRP), Isan Culture Maintenance and Revitalization Program ‘Website’, [website], <http://icmrpthailand.org/en&gt;, accessed Nov. 29th 2012.

Link and contacts with John Draper during my visit to Thailand, Nov-Feb. 2012. Via SIL officials and FdV.

IJSL (1986), ‘The Question of an Official Language: Language Rights and the English Language Amendment’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (60).

In Oct. 1982, Edward R. Neaher, Federal Judge in Brooklyn, NY, rejected a law suit pleading that social security forms are discriminatory because they are not printed in Spanish:”The National Language of the USA is English”

Ikeotuonye, Festus C.R.A. 2005. The problem of Order and the “Other”: Racism as a Cosmological Imperative of the Modern Condition. Paper read at Racism and Xenophobia: A European Dilemma Session B, at Stockholm, Room 361.

Other papers presented: Institutional Discrimination in France, Marie-Cécile Naves, The Interdisciplinary Center for Comparative Research in the Social Sciences (France) Nationalism, Religion and Racism in Nordic Societies, Sami Lipponen, Uppsala University (Sweden) European Imaginings of Otherness: Managing Conflict and Cultural Diversity in the New Europe. Immigrants and Portuguese Population, Maria Rovisco, Maria Lages, ISCTE-Institute of Scocial Sciences and Business Studies (Portugal)

Immam, M. (ed.), (1972), Minorities and the law. (Delhi: The Indian Law Institute).

Inglehart, Ronald F., and Margaret Woodward. 1988. Language Conflicts and Political Community. In The Rights of Peoples, edited by J. Crawford. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

412: Inglehart, R. F. and M. Woodward (1988). Language Conflicts and Political Community. The Rights of Peoples. J. Crawford. Oxford, Clarendon Press: 410-423. In the United States, the pattern was predominantly one of assimilation. Non-English-speaking immigrant groups spoke many languages and were faily well dispersed amont the English-speaking populations. Even in the case of concertrated ethnic ghettos, usually confined to large Eastern cities, assimilation to the English-speaking group seemed to be an obvious route for eventual social mobility, one which was encouraged and facilitated by the American public school system. But in many other countries, assimilation was slow and painful, and in some cases has not occured to this day. In Canada, for example, the French-speaking groups have been a compact mass until the last few edecades, with most of their contacts limited to other French Canadians. The distinctness of the two “races” was institutionalized by the British north Amrerica Act of 1867, which set up a federal system of government.. (en note: the union of the two Canadas had been attempted in 1840 with very little success. The FRENCH CLUNG MORE FIRMLY THAN EVER To their language, religion and outlook on life, and suspected that the British, having conquered and forcibly ruled them, were trying to desttoy their identity.) Unilingualism has been the rule ever since in the Canadian national government, in the armed forces, and in the overshelming majority of businesses:(413) one had to know English to advance beyond the menial level. The differences between the French and the British population were multiplied by the fact that, until relatively recently, the formere were largely an agrarian people, so that linguistic differences were complicatied by the antagonism of farm versus commercial interests.

Inglis, Christine. 1996. Multiculturalism: New policy Responses to Diversity, Most: UNESCO.

Cité par Wievorka, M. 2001. La Différence. Paris: Balland. p. 82

Isaan, Record, Blog,  <http://isaanrecord.com/&gt;, accessed 29 november 2012.

Ivins, Molly, and Lou Dubose. 2000. Shrub: The Short but Happy Political Life of George W. Bush. New York: Random House.

authors: Molly Ivins’s column is syndicated to more than two hundred newspapers, from Anchorage to Miami, including her home paper, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 3time Pulizer Price finalist, former coeditor of the Texas Observer and former Rocky Mountain bureau chief for The New York Times. Her first book, Molly Ivins Can’t Say that, Can She? spent more than twelve months on The New York Times bestseller list.Lou Dubose has been active in Texas journaloism for 17 years, as both a newspaper reporter and a freelancer, and has covered the Texas Legislature for the past 13 years. Since 1987, he has been the editor of The Texas Observer.xv: Bushes shrewdest political stroke has been a careful wooing of the Hispanic vote. Texas becomes majority minority (now, there’s a phrase) in 2008, meaning that blacks and Chicanos combined will outnumber Anglos, according to the demographers at Texas A&M….

Ivins, Molly and Dubose, Lou (2000), Shrub: The Short but Happy Political Life of George W. Bush (New York: Random House) 179.

authors: Molly Ivins’s column is syndicated to more than two hundred newspapers, from Anchorage to Miami, including her home paper, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 3time Pulizer Price finalist, former coeditor of the Texas Observer and former Rocky Mountain bureau chief for The New York Times. Her first book, Molly Ivins Can’t Say that, Can She? spent more than twelve months on The New York Times bestseller list.
Lou Dubose has been active in Texas journaloism for 17 years, as both a newspaper reporter and a freelancer, and has covered the Texas Legislature for the past 13 years. Since 1987, he has been the editor of The Texas Observer.
xv: Bushes shrewdest political stroke has been a careful wooing of the Hispanic vote. Texas becomes majority minority (now, there’s a phrase) in 2008, meaning that blacks and Chicanos combined will outnumber Anglos, according to the demographers at Texas A&M. So wooing the Hispanic vote may seem like a no-brainer, but as you know, Republicans have not, tradition


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