Bibliography (M) like Masliah….see also (R)!


Links to my bibliography from A to Z:

A      B     C     D     E     F     G     H        I     J     K     L     

M ( this page) N O P Q R S T U V W/X/Y/Z

Last Update: May 2nd, 2020. 

Reminder:italics and red means my notes or favourite quotes.

There are two parts to this bibliography: Part A is the list of authors and titles, list B includes my notes when I made any.

PART A: FULL LIST

MacBride, S. 1980. “Many Voices, One World.” In. Paris: International Commission for the Study of Communication Problems, UNESCO.
Machan, T.W. , and Scott Ch.T. 1992. English in its Social Contexts: Essays in Historical Sociolinguistics, (Oxford University Press: Oxford).
MacIntyre, Alasdair. 1993. Quelle Justice? Quelle Rationalité? (P.U.F.: Paris).
Mackey, W.F. 1976. Bilinguisme et Contact des Langues (Klingsieck: Paris).
Makinson, David. 1988. ‘A Logician’s Point of View.’ in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Clarendon Press: Oxford).
Makkai, Toni , and Ian McAllister. 1988. ‘Immigrants in Australian Society: Backgrounds, Attainment and Politics.’ in Jake M. Najman and Western John S. (eds.), A Sociology of Australian Society: Introductory Readings (Macmillan Education Australia Pty: Melbourne).
Malet, Albert, and Jules Isaac. 1959. L’Histoire (Librairie Hachette).
Maley, William , Charles Sampford , and Ramesh Thakur (ed.)^(eds.). 2002. From Civil Strife to Civil Society: Civil and Military responsibilities in disrupted states (United Nations University Press: Tokyo).
Maltby, Richard. 1995. Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction (Blackwell: Oxford).
Marger, Martin N. 1991. Race and Ethnic Relations: American and Global Perspectives (Wadsworth Publishing Company: Belmont, CA).
Marsh, George. 1860. “Lectures on the English Language.” In.
Marshall, C., D. Mitchell, and F. Wirt. 1989. Culture and Education Policy in the American States (Falmer Press: New York).
Marshall, David F. 1986. ‘The Question of an Official Language: language rights
and the English Language Amendment’, International Journal of the
Sociology of Language: 7.
Martel, Angéline. 1996. ‘Language Planning,Ideology and Constitutional Law: Francophone Minority Education in Canada’, Language Problems and Language Planning, 20: 127-56.
Martin, Lawrence. 1995. Chrétien, the Will to Win (Lester Publishing: Toronto).
Martinez-Cobo. 1984. “Study of the Problem of Discrimination against Indigenous Populations.” In. Geneva: International Labour Organization.
Martiniello, Marco. 1995. L’ethnicité dans les sciences sociales contemporaines (Presses Universitaires de France: Paris).
Masland, Tom. 1999. “Looking for their Roots: On the West Coast of Africa, where millions of slaves saw their homeland for the last time, African-Americans now search for the memories of their ancestors.” In Newsweek, 72.
Massey, Douglas S. (ed.)^(eds.). 1987. Return to Azlan, The Social Process of International Migration from Western Mexico (University of California Press: Berkeley).
———. 1988. ‘Economic Development and Interantional Migrations’, Population and Development Review: 383-413.
Matthiasson, John S. 1986. ‘The Maritime Inuit: Life on the Edge.’ in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto).
Maurais, Jacques (ed.)^(eds.). 1987. Politique et aménagement linguistique (Conseil de la langue française; Le Robert: Québec et Paris).
Maveyraud, Cécile. 2001. “Les Piments de la colère.” In Télérama, 94-96.
M’Bow, Amadou M. 1985. “Introduction au débat général sur Plan 1984-89 à la quatrième session of la Conference Générale.” In. Paris: UNESCO.
McAndrew, M. 1993. The Integration of Ethnic Minority Students Fifteen Years after Bill 101: Some Issues Confronting Montreal’s French Language Public Schools (Université de Montréal, Centre d’Etudes Ethniques: Montréal).
McArthur, Tom. 1998. The English Languages (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge).
McCutcheon, Andrew. 1991. ‘Victoria’s Multicultural Agenda.’ in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change (Scribe: Melbourne).
McGroarty, Mary. 1996. “Multilingualism in the U.S. federal system: equity or expediency?” In American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) Conference, edited by AAAL. Chicago, Illinois.
———. 1997. ‘Language policy in the USA: National Values, Local Loyalties, Pragmatic Pressures.’ in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (John Benjamins Publishing Company: Amsterdam/Philadelphia).
McMurchy, Megan. 1994. ‘The Documentary.’ in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (Allen & Unwin: St Leonards, NSW).
McSweeney, Bill. 2003. ‘Flawed US Perspectives’, the Irish Time, June 21, 2003, pp. 13.
Mehedi, Mustapha. 1999. ‘L’éducation multiculturelle et interculturelle et la protection des minorités.’, Revue Québécoise de Droit International, 12: 25-32.

Michel, Véronique. 2020. “La Jeune Fille au Verre de Vin.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.
———. 2020. “Le Baiser, de Klimt.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.
———. 2020. “Le David de Michel-Ange.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.
———. 2020. “Les Ménines.” In, edited by Historia del Arte Grupo. Zoom.
———. 2020. “Night Hawks de Hopper.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.
———. 2020. “Rothko.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.
———. 2020. “Soulages et l’Abbaye de Conques.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.
Mikes, George. 1968. Mortal Passion (Penguin Books: Harmondsworth, Middlesex).
Miller, David. 1995. On Nationality (Oxford University Press: Oxford).
Miller, Virginia. 1986. ‘The Micmac: A Maritime Woodland Group.’ in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto).
Mills, Charles W. 1998. Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race (Cornell University Press: Ithaca and London).
Milner, Jean-Claude. 1995. Introduction à une science du langage (Editions du Seuil: Paris).
———. 2006. Le juif de savoir (Grasset).
Mitchell-Kernan, Claudia. 1969. “Language behavior in a black urban community.” In. Berkeley, California: Language Behavior Research Laboratory.
Mizubayashi, Akira. 2011. Une langue venue d’ailleurs (Gallimard Paris).
Moffett, Samuel E. 1972. The Americanization of Canada (Toronto).
Moisy, Claude. 1996. L’Amérique en marche arrière (Hachette Livre: Paris).
Mongin, Olivier. 1995. ‘Le spectre du multiculturalisme américain: Retour sur une controverse: du “politiquement correct ” au multiculturalisme’, Esprit: 83-87.
Montgomery, Michael. 1999. ‘Eiteenth-Century Sierra Leone English: Another exported variety of African American English’, English World-Wide, 1: 1-34.
Morawska, Ewa. 2005. “Immigrants and Citizenship: An Ethnographic Assessment.” In 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Migration and Citizenship, edited by Masamichi Sasaki. Stockholm, Norra Latin, Aula 3d Floor: University of Essex.
Morgan, Marcyliena. 1998. ‘More than an mood or an attitude: discourse and verbal genres in African-American Culture.’ in Slikoko S. Mufwene, John R. Rickford, Guy Bailey and Baugh John (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (Routledge: London).
Morrison, B., and Wilson R. 1986. Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto).
———. 1986. ‘On the Study of Native Peoples.’ in, Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (McClelland & Stewart: Toronto).
Moscato, M. , and Wittwer J. 1978. La Psychologie du Langage (PUF: Paris).
Mouillon, Philippe. 1995. ‘Un voisinage mondial.’ in Jean-Pierre Saez (ed.), Identités, Cultures et Territoires (Desclée de Brouwer: Paris).
Mufwene, Slikoko S. 1997. ‘Gullah Development: Myth and Socio-historical Evidence.’ in Cynthia Berstein, Thomas Nunnally and Robin Rabino (eds.), Language Variety in the South Revisited (The University of Alabama Press).
Mufwene, Slikoko S., and John R. Rickford. 1998. ‘Introduction to African-American English: Structure, History and Use.’ in (Routledge: London).
Mufwene, Slikoko S., John R. Rickford, Guy Bailey, and Baugh John (ed.)^(eds.). 1998. African-American English: Structure, History and Use (Routledge: London).
Muhlhausler, P. 1986. Pidgin and Creole Linguistics (Basil Blackwell: Oxford).
Murray, Scott (ed.)^(eds.). 1994. Australian Cinema (Allen & Unwin: St Leonards, NSW).
———. 1994. ‘Australian directors overseas 1970-1992.’ in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (Allen & Unwin: St Leonards, NSW).
Murray, Scott, Raffaele Caputo, and Claudine Thoridnet. 1994. ‘Filmography: one hundred and fifty Australian films.’ in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (Allen & Unwin: St Leonards, NSW).
Mutombo, Kanyana. 2002. ‘Comment les Noirs se sont eux-mêmes oubliés à Strasbourg’, Regards Africains: 58-59.
———. 2002. ‘Duel entre victimes: Juifs vs. Noirs…’, Regards Africains: 62-63.
Mydans, Seth. 1999. ‘Reluctantly, Australia opts to save the Queen’, International Herald Tribune (New York Times Service), Monday, November 8, 1999, pp. 1 &10.

PART B: DETAILED LIST

MacBride, S. 1980. Many Voices, One World. Paris: International Commission for the Study of Communication Problems, UNESCO.

McCann, C. (1998). This Side of Brightness. London-Berlin-New York, Phoenix.

3: They arrive at dawn in their geography of hats. A dark field of figures, stalks in motion, bending towards the docklands. Scattered at first in the streets of Brooklyn -they have come by trolly and ferry and elevated train- they begin to gather together in a wave. Hard men, diligent in the smoking of cigarettes, they stamp yesterday’s mud from their boots as they walk.(…) Some of the men have big moustaches that move like prairie grasses above their lips. Others are young and raw from razors. All of them have faces hollowed by the gravity of their work -they smoke furiously with the knowledge of those who might be dead in just a few hours. Hunching down into their overcoats, they can perhaps still smell last night on their bodies – they might have been drunk or they might have been making love or they might have been both at once. 5: After a few minutes, Power crouches down and takes a deck of cards from his dungarees. The men search in their pockets for coins and play hog poker while the air compresses their bodies to thirty-two pounds per square inch. Walker wins the first round and Power slaps the young black man on the shoulder. ‘Look at you, hey, the king of spades!’ But Walker takes no offence. He knows there is a democracy beneath the river. In the darkness everyman’s blood runs the same colour -a dago the same as a nigger the same as a polack the same as a mick- so Walker just laughs, puts the winning in his pocket, and deals the second hand. 8: Nathan Walker will later sit shivering in the hospital lock and say to his friends:’if only them other guys knew how to talk American, nothing bad woulda happened, nothing at all, not a damn thing.

McCann, C. (2009). Let the Great World Spin. London-Berlin-New York, Bloomsbury.

Machan, T.W. , and Scott Ch.T. 1992. English in its Social Contexts: Essays in Historical Sociolinguistics,. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

MacIntyre, Alasdair. 1993. Quelle Justice? Quelle Rationalité? Translated by M. Vignaux d’Hollande. Paris: P.U.F.
Whose Justice? Which Rationality? 1988, London, Duckworkth

Cité par Puppo, Alberto. 2002. Les langues entre traditions et droit: de la traduction radicale au verbalisme interculturel. Droit et Cultures 344:21-31.

Elabore une distinction entre langue-en-usage (langue enracinée dans le tissu des croyances communautaires) et langue internationalisée “développée de façon à devenir accessible à tout le monde et à n’importe qui,  indépendamment de toute appartenance communautaire”.

Mackey, W.F. 1976. Bilinguisme et Contact des Langues. Paris: Klingsieck.

Makinson, David. 1988. A Logician’s Point of View. In The Rights of Peoples, edited by J. Crawford. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

90: Les trois pays (US, Canada et Australie) ont établi des agences gouvernementales d’aide au développement (USAID, CIDA et ADAB respectivement). Les trois entités se trouvent également au premier rang des natios visées par l’article de la Chgarte des Droits de Peuples concernant le droit à des compensations pour les préjudices subtits par les collectivités tenues en esclavage, opprimées ou spoliées de leurs terres: “c’est le sujet même du débat aux Etats Unis, au Canada et en australie, en relation avec les droits au territoire revendiqués par les peuples indigènes”

Makkai, Toni , and Ian McAllister. 1988. Immigrants in Australian Society: Backgrounds, Attainment and Politics. In A Sociology of Australian Society: Introductory Readings, edited by J. M. Najman and W. J. S. Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia Pty.

NOTE: THE FOLLOWING ABSTRACTS WERE SCANNED YEARS AGO AND THEY STILL CONTAIN TYPOS DATING BACK TO THE EARLY SCANNING YEARS, ABOUT 15 YEARS AGO…. 178:Australia is a nation built on immigration. In 1991, almost one in four of the population had been born overseas, with the majority coming from nonEngllshspeaking countries In total, around one in every three Australians is either an ummigranr or the child of an immigrant The level of immigration to Ausnalia is marched in the Western world only by Canada and the United States, which both maintained large-scale immigration programs in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries In the post-war years, the only country to sustain a level of immigration comparable to Australia is Israel, which is also a country that has been created by large-scale, recent population movement. In contrast to the United States or Canada, where immigrants have been highly visible members of the society for more than a century, it is only m the last two decades that the migrant presence in Australia has had any significant impact on the country’s culture, socio-economic structure or politics. In pan, this change has been brought about by the different ethnic composition of the migrant intake, the rise of ethnic lobhy groups and by the government’s policy response to this change. But in part, ,, the higher profile of immigrants has followed a worldwide trend in which ethnicity has become an increasmgly salient characteristic for group loyalty and political mobilisation.

179: former Soviet Union, the ex-Communist states of Eastern Europe, or in the liberal democracies of Western Europe, are all indicative of this trend. Rather than disappearing, then, as traditional sociological theories once predicted, ethnicity has become more important in many societies, regardless of their stage of socio-economic development. The resurgence of ethnicity represents the failure of three major theories about change in indusmal societies: functionalism developmental or modemisauon theory, and Marxism. All of these theories viewed ethnicity as a ‘premodern phenomenon, a residue of particularism and ascription incompatible with the vend toward achievement, universalism and nationality supposedly exhibited by indusvlal societies’ (van den Berghe 1981: 17). As society developed, these theories predicted that ethnic differences would simply cease to be important. But contradicting these predictions, ethnicity has re-emerged as an important factor in many societies in the late twentieth century.

Multiracial and ethnically plural societies are generally a consequence of one of two types of immigration or, very occasionally, a combination of the two. The first type of immigration occurred when some societies experienced populauon movements many thousands of years ago, at which ume indigenous ethnic minorities were settled. The second type of immigration has taken place in modem times, either by legal or illegal means, producing an ethnically distinct minonty or group of minorities. In Australia, both of these processes have occurred: Aborigines are thought to have arrived on the continent many thousands of years ago, while white settlement began in 1788 and the large-scale migration of non-English-speakers did nor begin until 1947.

This chapter examines the background to immigration in Australia, focusing particularly on the post-1947 period, and the emergence of multiculturalism in the mid-1970s. We also analyse the socio-economic backgrounds and attainments of immigrants, their role in the labour market and the social mobility that they are likely to experience. Finally, the chapter examines immigrant political behaviour in Australia and traces the emergence of the elusive ‘ethnic vote’ The data rely mainly on a survey conducted in 1988-89 on behalf of the Office of Mulriculrural Affairs, derails of which are provided in the Appendix

180-181: An Immigrant Society

Immigration to Australia has progrrssed through four major phases, each drawing migrants fiom a different part of the world, and each relying on a different set of policies and pnonrics. As Table 6.1 indicates, the Anglo-Celtics were the major focus of immigration policies until the 1970s, with gradual supplementation by continental Europeans after 1947. Frier to 1901, immigration was largely uncontrolled. With federation, assimilation became the prevailing policy far the first half of the twentieth century, with a change to integration during the late 1960s. Set against patterns of pre-1972 immigration, the situation in the 1970s and 80s represents a radical departure: not only have the regional origins of migrants changed dramatically from Europe to Asia but government policy has moved through three phases, from assimilation to integration and most recently, to accepting migrants’ languages and culture through multiculturalism.

Pre-1947 Immigration

Since Governor Phillip arrived in Sydney Harbour with eleven British ships in 1788, over 6 million peopic have emigrated to Australia (Armit et al 1988: 1). The history of immigration has been an interaction between demand and supply. The initial immigrants were mainly convicts, for whom Australia provided a secure prison, as well as maintaining the country as a British colony. The first significant numbers of free immigrants did not arnve until the late 1820s, atrracted by the expansion of the wool industry. Many saw little future in remaining in Britain as the population was dispersed from rural to urban areas by the Industnai Revolution During the late 1840s the number of settlers was swelled by Irish immigrants escaping the potato famine.

The largest infiux of migrants per head of population in the history of white settlement occurred during the 1851-61 goldrush period, when the white Australian population of just under half a million was swollen by 700,000 immigrants (Armit et al 1988: 17) The goldrush immigrants included a substanrial minority of Chinese workers, the first non-white immigrants to arrive in Australia. These workers were wewed by white immigrants as dirty, drug-addicted and as a threat to the Australian way of life, particularly because of their willingness to work long hours for little reward in poor and often dangerous conditions. The anti-Chinese feelings that developed an the goldfields culminated in Victoria and New South Wales passing immigration laws to restrict the entry of Chinese into their jurisdictions.

The decline in gold mining coincided wiih the industrial expansion of Sydney and Melboume. The gold miners of the 1850s became the industrial workforce of the 1860s and one of their prime concerns was to protect their jobs and livelihoods from other immigrants (Armit et al. 1988). As a consequence, New South Wales and Victoria opposed further immigration, but Queensland and South Australia connnued to encourage immigrants in order to develop their own economies. There was a continuing problem in recruiting labour for the Queensland canefields which resulted in farmers importing Pacific Islanders (referred to as Kanakas), many of whom were kidnapped or duped into working in Australia.

Federation in 1901 provided the two southern states with the opportunity to further restnct non-white immigration, a view that was endorsed by the trade union movement, since it was feared that ‘Asian’ or ‘coloured’ people would take the jobs of white workers by accepting a lower standard of Iiving and hence lower wages. These two issues — jobs and quality of life — were to simmer quietly in debates about immigration until they were resurrected in the 1980s dunng the economic recession. The trade unions also opposed assisted passages from the United Kingdom, and by the 1880s they had been virtually abandoned, although they were reinrroduced in the early 1900s. Despite the anti-immigration lobby, around 1.3 million people immigrated to the colonies between 1851 and 189L. Nevertheless, Table 6.2 shows that by the rum of the century, more than three in four of the population had been born in Australia, a proportion almost exactly the same as that for the present day.

One of the first acts of the federal Parliament was to implement the Immigration Restriction Act 1901 or the ‘White Australia policy’ (Shenngron 1990; Hawluns 1989) A steady stream of Bntish immigrants continued to arrive until World War I, although there was also some migration from outside me British Isles, mainly from Germany and Scandinavia, who as northern Europeans were regarded as acceptable entrants. After World War I, the prewar immigration program was re-introduced, but consistent with the White Australia policy, two-thirds of the immigrants who arrived during the 1920s had assisted passages and were predominantly Bnrish (Armir et al. 1988: 25).

182-83:1947-72: Assimilation to Integration

After World War II the second major influx of immigrants began. The threat of invasion by the Japanese had brought home to the government the indefensibility of Australia in the absence of a large population OY~estem 1983; Jupp 1988). The government’s response was to adopt a policy of’populate or pensh’ and the mechanism to achieve this was a vigorous immigration program.

Under the direction of Arthur Calwell, the first Minister for Immigration, the government aimed to increase the population through immigration by 1 per cent annually. It was clear that the British Isles could not provide the level of immigration required for this ambitious target, and as a replacement, the government targeted the enormous number of displaced persons generated by World War II, From 1948 to 1952, the assisted passage scheme was extended to a wide range of continental European countries, whose people were seen as being easily assimilated into Australian society.’

Until the 1970s, British migrants were given special status, and privileges denied to other immigrant groups. In the early post-war migration, European refugees with assisted passage were required to perform two years’ labour for the government, while their British counterparts were exempt. In 1958 the Migration Act was revised so that British citizens were eligible for social security but non-British migrants were required to become citizens before becoming eligible. Bntish immigrants were not required to obtain visas for either visitor or permanent residency status and they had the right to vote in Australian elections regardless of their citizenship. These more favourable condiuons offered to Bnush migrants

were gradually removed after 1975.2

During the 1950s and 60s, prohibitive restrictions on the immigration of non-Europeans were gradually removed. In 1958, the controversial dictation test, whereby potential immigrants were required to pass a written examination in any language specified by the Department of Immigration, was abolished. At the same time, the 1901 Immigration Restricion Act was replaced by the immgration Act (Hawkins 1989). It was this particular reform that has often been seen as the fust step in the policy shift away from assimilation (Martin 1978). In 1966, immigration policy towards non-Europeans was reviewed and applications were considered from anyone who was well-qualified and prepared to integrate into Australian society.

Prior to the mid-1960s, the government did little to assist migrants other than to place them in their first job, a policy which was effectively assimilationist: to find work, migrants had to

conform to the norms and values of Australian society (Collins 1988). Nowhere was the goal of social conforrmsm more evident than in the Good Neighbour movement established in the 1950s, which was intended to help migrants adjust to the Australian way of life through widening their contacts with the English-speaking population around 1966: 9). The problem, however, was that it became increasingly obvious that rmgrants were not assimilating into Australian society. First, significant numbers were returning to their country of origin: it was estimated that over 15 per cent of immigrants who arrived between 1959 and 1965 returned home (Westem 1989: 255). Second, many immigrants did not acquire English language slulls, largely because the English requirements were minimal in most unskilled occupations.

The 1960s heralded a subtle change in government policy, away from assimilauon and towards integration. The first indication of this change was the renaming in 1964 of the Assimilation Section within the Department of Immigration as the Integration Section (Collins 1988). In 1968, intensive English training courses for immigrants were started far the first time, and in 1969 the Committee on Overseas Professional Qualifications was established to seek ways of utilising more effectively the qualifications gained by immigrants in non-Englishs speaking countries. In June 1969, the Labor Party modified its immigration policy, stating that race, colour or nationality should nor be considered as critena for immigration to Australia

Post-1972: Multiculturalism

With the election of the Whitlam Labor government in 1972, the White Australia policy was finally laid to rest.  integration acknowledged that immigrants would have early adjustment

difficulties and therefore would need to retain their culture and language, the new policy of multiculruralism accepted that the retention of culture and language should nor only be allowed but actively encouraged. In 1973, AJ. Grassby outlined the goverment’s new policy towards immigrams in a booklet called A Multicultural Society for the Future The adoption of the term ‘multiculturalism’ had much to do with the Canadian experience.

The idea of encouraging cultural pluralism had emerged in Canada in the 193os, becoming associated with the catchword “mosaic” However, it was not until the early 1970s that the term multiculruralism entered eveglday use (Bullivant 1980). Canadian experience and terminology was the model adopted by Australian observers.

When the Liberal Party was elected in 1975 they confirmed their commitment to multiculturalism and provided the resources to establish ethnic councils. These have emerged as powerful pressure groups, exerting considerable influence on govemment policy arround 1991). The GoibnNy Report on the post-arrival programs and services available to migrants, published in 1978, listed 57 policy objectives, to which the govemmenr responded with five major policy initiatives (Collins 1988; Jupp 1991; Betts 1988; Hawluns 1989). These initiatives included reversing the previous government’s policy and increasing the number of immigrants, introducing programs m schools to promote migrant languages and cultures, and establishing the National Ethnic Broadcasung Advisory Council and the Special Broadcasting Smicc(SBS).

One notable change in the migrant intake in the post-1972 penod has been the increasing numbers of refugees. In the immediate postwar period, refugees came mainly from Poland, the Baltic states and other Eastern European countries that had fallen under Communist rule (Collins 1988: 55). In the most recent period, the major source has been Indochina, with refugees fleeing the consequences of the Communist takeover of South Vietnam (Virriani 1984). Throughout the 1980s, Indochinese refugees accounted for more than half of all refugee amvals in Australia under the Special Humanitarian Program established in 1981 As Figure 61 demonstrates, among developed nations, Australia has taken the largest proportion of Indochinese refugees relative to population size.

In terms of parry politics, the period since 1975 has been marked by a bipartisan policy favouring a high level of immigration and support for the concept of multiculturalism. However, there has been considerable questioning of the political and economic advisability of current immigration policies In 1984, a Melbourne University academic, Professor Geoffrey Blainey, delivered a speech criticising the high levels of Asian immigration and the difficulties in assimilation. As Table 6.2 indicates, just over 5 per cent of the population in 1991 had been born in Asia, about half of them in Southeast Asia’ It is estimated that by 2010, the Asian component of the population wrll be no more than 7 per cent. Moreover, a large proportion of Asian immigrants are from Former British colonies. As Jupp (1991: 90) argues, many of these immigrants are better educated than the average Australian, are fluent in English, and ‘are culturally closer to the Australian norm than most of the Europeans who arrived in the 195Os and 1960s’.

The government policy of multiculturalism has removed many of the obligations prcnously placed on unmigrants by the policies of assimilation and integration. This debate resurfaced with the publication of the FigGemid Report in 1988, which reviewed Australia’s immigration policies. It recommended that immigration should be increased, but with a greater emphasis being placed an economic migrants, and those demonstrating a stronger commitment to Australian values and institutions. The report was opposed by the major ethnic groups, who saw it as an attack an the family reunion program, and the government rejected its major recommendations. In 1989, govemmenr policy on multiculturalism was further refined with the publication of a National Agenda for a Multicultural Australia (..) represents a new phase in Australia’s treatment of migrants, heralded same years before, in which barriers towards access and equity for migrants are removed, mainly in the areas of government services and programs (Takubowicn 1987).

Given the high Ievels of immigration, it is perhaps surprising that Australia has not experienced race nets or popular support for neo-facist organisations, as has occurred in countnes like Britain, France, Germany or the United States. Both Collins (1988) and rupp (1991) argue that the diversity of the migrant intake has played an important role by creating a plural society. In addition, despite the recent emphasis on Asian imrmgrarion, two-thirds of the population have either been born in the British Isles or have one or more parents who are descended from British settlers. Three other factors have also been important in maintaining ethnic and racial stability. First, the social structure is relatively open compared with most other countries, permitting social mobility National Population Council 1991). Second, there has been relative prospenty during periods of high immigration, reducing potential native-serrler connict. Finally, Australia has traditionally granted full social and poliucal rights to all immigrants, thereby ensuring their support for the prevailing political system (Collins 1988; Population Issues Committee 1991; Jupp 1991)

Public Opinion on Immigration and Multiculturalism

Since bipartisanship an immigration and multiculturalism became the norm in the early 1970s, immigration or muluculturalism have rarely surfaced as political issues in parry political debate.

The reasons behind the lack of an informed political debate include the parties’ desire to preserve their own positions by restricting electoral competition along a single economic dimension; the fear that a debate over such fundamental social issues could threaten regime stability and the political ‘rules of the game’; and the importance of multiculturalism as a means of extending fundamental citizen rights (McAllister 1992a). In the absence of a public debate between political Clites, public opinion, therefore, does not possess the necessary information with which to reach an informed decision; the net effect has been that such opinion on these issues lacks consistency and coherence over any extended period of time.

Although the debate over unmigrarion has been eschewed by the political parues, periodic conflict over the issue between a variety of interest groups and individuals has served to make public opinion aware of at least some of the arguments. In the 1980s, the debate was concerned mainly ~ulth Asian immigration, but in the early 1990s it focused on whether any immigration at all — regardless of immigrants’ geographical origins — was desirable This view has been supported by environmentalists, with writers such as Birrell and Birrell (1981) arguing that continuing immigration rcsults not only in a decline in Australia’s standard of living, but also in irreparable environmental damage. The government responded to this debate by commissioning the National population Council to exarmne all aspects of immigration and associated population growth (Population Issues Committee 1991).

Although public opinion on immigration is unstable, and the differences in identifying trends are further compounded by changes in question wordings in the opinion polls, Figure 6.2

suggests two patterns Firnr, the post-war years show that while popular opinion has fluctuated considerably, there have been two periods in which immigration has been especially unpopular.

These penods — in the early 1970s and early 1980s, respectively  correspond roughly to peaks in the immigiant intake, suggesting a popular reaction against high levels of immigration.

Second, public opinion on Asian immigration is closely linked with opinion on immigration as a whole, and is not seen as a separate issue. As a result, popular views on Asian immigration tend to reflect shifts in opinion on the question of immigration as a whole.

Identifying trends in public opinion on multiculturalism presents greater difficulties. The major problem is that considerable ambiguity surrounds the use of the term ‘multiculturalism’

Some use it as a simple description of a society that contains a variety of ethnic and racial groups; others see it more positively, as a policy for securing equal ethnic and racial representation in the community. The former definition has few, if any, policy implications; the latter definition has distmct implications for governmenr policies across a wide range of areas. clven the confusion over its meaning even within political elites, it is not surprising that there is even more confusion within public opinion.

At a theoretical level, however, the term has a clearer meaning.

A society can respond to cultural diversity in a variety of ways.

One approach is to ensure that minority cultural groups assimilate into the culture of the maiority, and this was the policy of successive Australian governments towards immigrants until the 1960s. Perhaps the best known version of the assimilationist approach is the ‘straight line’ theory of Gans (1968; see also Gordon 1975), whereby ethnic groups are systematically absorbed into the host society with the passage of time. An alternative approach to cuirural diversity is to see it as an asset and to encourage it, so that minorities retain their own cultures so long as an overall loyalty is maintained to the society as a whole. This has been the approach adopted by Australian governments since the early 1970s.

Given that multiculturalism only became government policy in relatively recent rimes, we would expect some residual popular support far assimilation to remain, and Table 6.9 shows that this is indeed the case. Around one-third of the Australians in the 1988 survey agreed ‘very much’ with the three assirmlationist statements. English-speaking-bom (ESB) and non-English-speaking born (NESB) migrants are actually mure supportive of assimilation, with die exception that NESB immigrants are less likely to support the statement that ‘different cultural groups in Australia causes lots of problems’ There is, however, very considerable support for the three statements reflecting muiticulturalism

A large majority of Australians support all three, and the level of support increases among ESB and NESB immigrants.

It is this strong popular support which provides a bate for the policy of muluculturalism. In this sense, multiculturalism conforms to the notion of a valence issue, which is defined as an opinion which records a vast majority m support of it, and produces utllty rather than division (Stokes 1966: 170-71). For example, posing an undeniable social good — such as asking voters if the government should try and elirmnate poverty or spend more on health constitutes a valence issue. Multiculturalism has become such an issue because there has been a parry political consensus to support it, and considerable steps have been taken to ensure that it has not become politically dnvislve. The divisions within public opinion over the level of immigration have more serious consequences for govemment, for although immigration policy is not driven by public opinion, nor can such strong popular opinions be ignored.
A major assumption underlying multiculruralism, as already noted, is that ethnic groups will develop a loyalty to their new country, while retaining cultural and social links with the country in which they were born. Of the major ethmc groups, however, Table 6.4 shows that all but one have lower levels of identification with Australia than the Australianism, some of them registering significantly lower levels. The exception is Greek immigrants, 72 per cent of whom reported that they regarded me term ‘Australian’ as being very important to them. However, at the other end of the scale, only 34 per cent of Bntish immigrants regarded it as very unpopular. The data also show that some immigrant groups retain high levels of ethnic identification, most notably the Vietnamese (61 per cent) and, again, the Greeks (59 per cent).

These comparatively low levels of identification can be explained by several factors. First, Australia has traditionally harboured lower levels of nationalist feelings than many other

countnes, notably Britain and the United States, and this has been reinforced by the absence of a strong indigenous military tradition and a relatively secure sea frontier. Second, most countries use citizenship as a means of increasing regime support, but in Australia most unmigrams lack any incentive to became citizens a situation which the 1988 Wlz(iernid Report sought to changer Finally, as we argue in the context of political behaviour, the major incentives for immigrants to come to Australia are social (such as family reunion), necessity (refugees) or economic (seelung material success). In this context, developing an affective attachment to the nation they have joined is likely to have a low priority.

Family and Acquired Capital

Immigrants bring to Australia a wide vanety of slulls, qualifications and experiences, and these diWr considerably between the birthplace groups. The major theory that accounts for differences in socioeconomic attainments assumes that indivrduals receive economic rewards that are cummensurare with their skills, qualifications and experience.

The human capital acquired by an individual is reflected not only m his or her own sacio-economic attainments, but in the capital that they inherit from their family, which has a

direct bearing on the attainments that they themsclvrs will achieve later in their life. For example, a wealthy family will have more money to spend on a child’s education than a pear family and this will, in turn, be converted into a higher status occupation and larger income. In the case of migrants, the concept of human capital can be expanded to include English language proficiency and length of residence in the adopted country, both of which are attributes that are valued by potential employers and which attract economic rewards in the marketplace (Bevans and Kelley 1986).

Malet, Albert, and Jules Isaac. 1959. L’Histoire. aout 1994 ed. 4 vols. Vol. 2: Librairie Hachette.

Maley, William , Charles Sampford , and Ramesh Thakur, eds. 2002. From Civil Strife to Civil Society: Civil and Military responsibilities in disrupted states, UN Series on Foundations of Peace. Tokyo: United Nations University Press.
communiqué par Cyril Ritchie

Malraux, André (citation complète note 19 Trotsky au S.I., 16 juin 1934, Bibliothèque d’histoire sociale, Œuvres, p. 101.)

Reprise par Patrick Deville, Viva, page 56 citation de Malraux s’adressant à Trotsky dans Marianne : 

« puisse votre ombre clandestine, qui depuis presque 10 en s’en va d’exil en exil, faire comprendre aux ouvriers de France et à tous ceux qu’anime cette obscure volonté de liberté rendue assez claire par les expulsions, que s’unir dans un camp de concentration, c’est s’unir un peu tard.”

Maltby, Richard. 1995. Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Mantel, H. (2009). Wolf Hall. London, Fourth Estate.

P. 27-28:”This is my intention. What I mean to do is to convene a small court here in London. We will approach him in a shcked fasion: King Harry, you appear to have lived all these years in an unlawful manner, with a woman not your wife. He hates -saving His Majesty- to appear in the worng: which is where we must put him, very firmly. Possibly he will forget that the original scruples were his. Possibly he will shout at us, and hasten in a fit of indignation back to the queen. If not, then I must have the dispensation revoked, here or in Rome, and if I succeed in parting him from Katherine I shall marry him, smartly, to a French princess.”

No need to ask if the cardinal (Wolsey) has a particular princess in mind. He has not one but two or three. He never lives in a single reality, but in a shifting shadow-mesh of diplomatic possibilities. While he is doing his best to keep the king married to Queen Katherine and her Spanish-Imperial family, by begging Henry to forget his scruples, he will also plan for an alternative world, in which the king’s scruples must be heeded, and the marriage to Katherine is void.

192: He simpers. “Les dépêches, toujours les dépêches”

“That’s the ambassador’s life”, He (Ambassador Chapuy) looks up and smiles. “Thomas Cromwell”.

“Ah, c’est le juif errant!”

At once the ambassador apologises: whilst smiling around, as if bemused, at the success of his joke.

(…)

“We will speak French, gentlemen” says Bonvisi.

French, as it happens ,is the first language of the ambassador of the Empire and Spain; and like any other diplomat, he will never take the trouble to learn English, for how will hat help him in his next posting?

378: How can he explain to him? The world is not run from where he thinks. Not from his border fortresses, not even from Whitehall. The world is run from Antwerp, from Florence, from places he has never imagined; from Lisbon, from where the ships with sails of silk drift west and are burned up in the sun. Not from casle wallls, but from counting houses, not by the all of the bugle but by the click of the abacus, not by the grate of the pen on the page of the promissory note that pays for the gun and the gunsmith and the powder and the shop.

533:He thinks, we don’t want our king to be the poor man of Europe. Spain and Portugal have treasure flowing in every year from the Americas.

585-586: These last months, the countcil has never been out of harness. A hard summer of negotiating has brought a treaty with the Scots. But Ireland is in revolt. Only Dublin Castel itself and the town of Waterford hold out for the king, while the rebel lords are offering their services and their harbours to the Emperor’s troops. Among these isles it is the most wretched of territories, which does not pay the king what it costs him to garrison it; but he cannot turn his back on it, for fear of who else might come in. Law is barely respected there, for the Irish think you can buy off murder with money, and likethe Welsh they cost out a man’s life in cattle. These people are kept poor by imposts and seizures, by foreitures and plain daylight robbery; the pious English abstain from meant on Wednesday and Fridays, but the joke runs that the Irish are so godly they abstain every other day as well. Their great lords are brutal and imperious men, treacherous and fickle, inveterate feuders, extortionists and hostage takers, and their allegiance to England they hold cheap, for they are loyal to nothing and prefer force of arms to law (…)

No wonder they don’t want to be English. It would interrupt their status as slave-Owner.

Marger, Martin N. 1991. Race and Ethnic Relations: American and Global Perspectives. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Marsh, George. 1860. Lectures on the English Language.

cité par J. Edwards(1994) p. 7

Marshall, C., D. Mitchell, and F. Wirt. 1989. Culture and Education Policy in the American States. New York: Falmer Press.

Marshall, David F. 1986. The Question of an Official Language: language rights and the English Language Amendment. International Journal of the Sociology of Language (60):7.

Martel, Angéline. 1996. Language Planning,Ideology and Constitutional Law: Francophone Minority Education in Canada. Language Problems and Language Planning 20 (Eté 1996):127-156.

Martin, Lawrence. 1995. Chrétien, the Will to Win. Toronto: Lester Publishing.

Martinez-Cobo. 1984. Study of the Problem of Discrimination against Indigenous Populations. Geneva: International Labour Organization.

Martiniello, Marco. 1995. L’ethnicité dans les sciences sociales contemporaines. Vol. 2997, Que Sais-Je ? Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.

Masland, Tom. 1999. Looking for their Roots: On the West Coast of Africa, where millions of slaves saw their homeland for the last time, African-Americans now search for the memories of their ancestors. Newsweek, September 6, 1999, 72.

Massey, Douglas S., ed. 1987. Return to Azlan, The Social Process of International Migration from Western Mexico. Berkeley: University of California Press.

___. 1988. Economic Development and Interantional Migrations. Population and Development Review (14.3):383-413.

Matthiasson, John S. 1986. The Maritime Inuit: Life on the Edge. In Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience, edited by B. Morrison and W. R. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.

Maurais, Jacques, ed. 1987. Politique et aménagement linguistique. Québec et Paris: Conseil de la langue française; Le Robert.

Maveyraud, Cécile. 2001. Les Piments de la colère. Télérama, 28 mars 2001, 94-96.

(…) “A force de filmer les pauvres et les faibles, on tombe dans la pornographie sociale, explique Thierry Garrel, directeur de l’unité documentaire d’Arte France. Il était temps de remonter aux sources pour regarder les raisons de cette fracture sociale”. Autrement dit: passer de la description des symptômes à celle des causes. Huit réalisateurs ont accepté de relever le défi dans la nouvelle collection “La bourse et la vie”. Le capitalisme sous toutes ses formes, ne va pas être à la fête sur la chaine franco-allemande.

Le cinéaste haïtien Raoul Peck ouvre le feu avec Le profit et rien d’autre! ou réflexions abusives sur la lutte des classes
Sous cette appellation à double sens, il a réalisé une oeuvre qui dénonce le capitalisme et son fonctionnement. “On veut nous faire croire que c’est un état naturel, qu’il n’y a pas d’autres systèmes possibles. Ce discours dominant ne doit pas être pris pour argent comptant. Il n’y a aucune raison d’accepter le statu quo qu’on veut nous imposer”dit-il calmement.
Son pamphlet politico-poétique (…) est efficace et régénérant.
(…)
Dans Le Profit et rien d’autre!, il a interrogé les petites marchandes de Port-à-Piment, le bourg haïtien d’où sa famille est originaire et où il possède quelques arpents de terre. Il a même demandé à un de ses anciens collègues du gouvernement haïtien, Gérald Mathurin, en charge de l’agriculture, d’expliquer la façon dont le Nord a réussi à imposer son modèle éconoique au Sud.
(…)
Il s’interroge lui-même, à travers son commentaire, sur les combats de sa génération, sur les résultats concrets de ses engagements en tant que cinéaste. Dans son ton jusque-là combatif perce alors le désenchantement: “Nous avons essayé et pourtant le monde a à peine changé”- Tout Peck, ou presque, apparaît en concentré dans ce documentaire: HAîti, les rapports Nord-Sude et, au-delà, les rapports Noirs-Blancs, la politique, l’économie et le plaisir d’écrire.
Si Haïti habite la majorité de ses films et documentaires, il y a en fait peu vécu. Exilé depuis ses 9 ans, devenu nomade, sa route l’a mené tojours plus au nord, du Congo en France, puis en Allemagne, o?u il a sujivi une double formation d’ingénieur et de cinéaste. Ce n’est qu’après la chute de Jean-Claude Duvalier, en 1986, qu’il a pu enfin, à 30 ans passés, retrouver en toute liberté la terre de son enfance. “Les images que j’avais emportées avec moi étaient restées vives dans mon souvenir. Le temps et l’éloignement les avaient même embellies. Et puis chez nous, la diaspora est importante. Quelque soit l’endroit où je passais, il y avait un petit groupe d’Haîtiens. On se voyait le dimanche, pour faire ensemble la cuisine du pays et discuter de Haîti. Les liens ont donc toujours été forts.” Raoul Peck, activiste gauchiste des années 70 à Berlin-ouest, envisagea même un temps de retourner dans son pays sous une fausse identité afin de soulever la révolution. Le projet fut abandonné. “Je ne l’ai pas ressenti comme un échec. De toute façon nous aurions été tués. J’ai toujours essayé d’être utile et efficace, mais je n’ai jamais eu un esprit aveugle de sacrifice. J’ai changé de stratégie de combat: j’ai décidé de faire des films.”
Le premier, Carrefour Haïtien, sort en 1988, deux ans après la chute de Bébé doc. Peck y dénonce la torture des tontons macoutes et s’interroge sur al vengeance et le pardon. Plus tard, L’Homme sur les quais, en compétition à Cannes en 1993, montrera les débuts du duvaliérisme et la mise en place du processus de terreur.
Le Congo, où il débarque enfant en 1962 parce que son père a choisi de s’éloigner du régime de François Duvalier, nourit aussi une partie de son oeuvre, notamment à travers la figure de Patrice Lumumba. (…)
En 1991, Peck consacre au “nègre  à la barbe de chèvre” un remarquable documentaire, où il affirme d’emblée son style particulier .  Lumumba, la mort d’un prophète est protéiforme: le cinéaste se souvient à haute voix de ce que lui avait dit sa mère, interviewe les témoins de l’époque (proches, diplomates et journalistes belges), se raconte, lui, enfant au COngo. Ce film, à la fois hd’auteur et d’enquêteur est construit avec les images 8 mm familiales, des entretiens classiques, des images d’archives et d’autres plus évocatrices qu’informatives. “Je cherche en permanence à illustrer un point de vue ou une situation depuis plusieurs endroits à la fois, selon différents regards, à différents moment. Superposer les couchesd de récits, c’est une  manière d’approcher le plus possible la vérité” explique-t-il. Cette volonté d’envisager ce qui se passe sous différents angles est chez lui naturelle: “Je suis en permanence haïtien, congolais, français, allemand. Ca me permet d’avoir une grille de lecture plus fiable, plus sereine.
(…)
Aujourd’hui, Raoul Peck, qui a poussé le mimétisme jusqu’à arborer la même barbichette que Lumumba, se souvient encore de son arrivée au Congo et de son premier choc d’enfant: “J’arrivais avec des images de Blanc dans la tête. Je sortais d’un contexte “bourgeois”  influencé par les cultures française et américaine. Pour moi, l’9Afrique, c’était Tarzan, et j’étais du côté de Tarzan, pas des sauvages”. Aussi, pour lui, c’est un devoir de véhiculer dans ses films une image positive de l’homme noir. “Les jeunes Noirs sont imprégnés d’images qui ne leur correspondent pas, qui ne sont pas les leurs. De plus, chaque fois qu’il y a un noir dans  une fiction à la télévision je tremble, car souvent ce sont des caricatures ou des personnages pas crédibles. Comment voulez-vous qu’à partir de ça les jeunes se forgent une image positive de leur histoire et d’eux-mêmes?
Je suis sûr qu’en regardant Lumumba, la majorité des jeunes Burkinabés, Dominicains ou Haïtiens ont vu pour la première fois sur un écran des personnages qui leur ressemblaient et étaient aussi valorisants”.
Pour le définir, Pierre Chevalier, le directeur de la fiction d’Arte, dit qu’il est “entre deux”. Avant de préciser: “Entre Blanc et Noir, si j’ose dire”. Réponse de l’intéressé: “C’est une chance de pouvoir voir les choses en dedeans et en dehors. Je ne le vis pas comme une schizophrénie. Par exemple, dans Corps plongés, une fiction sur le thème de la mémoire et de l’exil, réalisée en 1998 pour Arte, je souhaitais traiter des difficultués d’être noir dans une société euro-centriste. En parler frontalement, c’était prendre le risque d’être caricatural. Ma position “entre deux” m’a aidé à aborder le sujet de façon détournée, plus décontractée.”
(…) “A force de filmer les pauvres et les faibles, on tombe dans la prnographie sociale, explique Thierry Garrel, directeur de l’unité documentaire d’Arte France. Il était temps de remonter aux sources pour regarder les raisons de cette fracture sociale”. Autrement dit: passer de la description des symptômes à celle des causes. Huit réalisateurs ont accepté de relever le défi dans la nouvelle collection “La bourse et la vie”. Le capitalisme sous toutes ses formes, ne va pas être à la fête sur la chaine franco-allemande.Le cinéaste haïtien Raoul Peck ouvre le feu avec Le profit et rien d’autre! ou réflexions abusives sur la lutte des classes. Sous cette appellation à double sens, il a réalisé une oeuvre qui dénonce le capitalisme et son fonctionnement. “On veut nous faire croire que c’est un état naturel, qu’il n’y a pas d’autres systèmes possibles. Ce discours dominant ne doit pas être pris pour argent comptant. Il n’y a aucune raison d’accepter le statu quo qu’on veut nous imposer”dit-il calmement.Son pamphlet politico-poétique (…) est efficace et régénérant.(…) Dans Le Profit et rien d’autre!, il a interrogé les petites marchandes de Port-à-Piment, le bourg haïtien d’où sa famille est originaire et où il possède quelques arpents de terre. Il a même demandé à un de ses anciens collègues du gouvernement haïtien, Gérald Mathurin, en charge de l’agriculture, d’expliquer la façon dont le Nord a réussi à imposer son modèle éconoique au Sud. (…)Il s’interroge lui-même, à travers son commentaire, sur les combats de sa génération, sur les résultats concrets de ses engagements en tant que cinéaste. Dans son ton jusque-là combatif perce alors le désenchantement: “Nous avons essayé et pourtant le monde a à peine changé”- Tout Peck, ou presque, apparaît en concentré dans ce documentaire: HAîti, les rapports Nord-Sude et, au-delà, les rapports Noirs-Blancs, la politique, l’économie et le plaisir d’écrire.Si Haïti habite la majorité de ses films et documentaires, il y a en fait peu vécu. Exilé depuis ses 9 ans, devenu nomade, sa route l’a mené tojours plus au nord, du Congo en France, puis en Allemagne, o?u il a sujivi une double formation d’ingénieur et de cinéaste. Ce n’est qu’après la chute de Jean-Claude Duvalier, en 1986, qu’il a pu enfin, à 30 ans passés, retrouver en toute liberté la terre de son enfance. “Les images que j’avais emportées avec moi étaient restées vives dans mon souvenir. Le temps et l’éloignement les avaient même embellies. Et puis chez nous, la diaspora est importante. Quelque soit l’endroit où je passais, il y avait un petit groupe d’Haîtiens. On se voyait le dimanche, pour faire ensemble la cuisine du pays et discuter de Haîti. Les liens ont donc toujours été forts.” Raoul Peck, activiste gauchiste des années 70 à Berlin-ouest, envisagea même un temps de retourner dans son pays sous une fausse identité afin de soulever la révolution. Le projet fut abandonné. “Je ne l’ai pas ressenti comme un échec. De toute façon nous aurions été tués. J’ai toujours essayé d’être utile et efficace, mais je n’ai jamais eu un esprit aveugle de sacrifice. J’ai changé de stratégie de combat: j’ai décidé de faire des films.”Le premier, Carrefour Haïtien, sort en 1988, deux ans après la chute de Bébé doc. Peck y dénonce la torture des tontons macoutes et s’interroge sur al vengeance et le pardon. Plus tard, L’Homme sur les quais, en compétition à Cannes en 1993, montrera les débuts du duvaliérisme et la mise en place du processus de terreur.Le Congo, où il débarque enfant en 1962 parce que son père a choisi de s’éloigner du régime de François Duvalier, nourit aussi une partie de son oeuvre, notamment à travers la figure de Patrice Lumumba. (…)En 1991, Peck consacre au “nègre  à la barbe de chèvre” un remarquable documentaire, où il affirme d’emblée son style particulier .  Lumumba, la mort d’un prophète est protéiforme: le cinéaste se souvient à haute voix de ce que lui avait dit sa mère, interviewe les témoins de l’époque (proches, diplomates et journalistes belges), se raconte, lui, enfant au COngo. Ce film, à la fois hd’auteur et d’enquêteur est construit avec les images 8 mm familiales, des entretiens classiques, des images d’archives et d’autres plus évocatrices qu’informatives. “Je cherche en permanence à illustrer un point de vue ou une situation depuis plusieurs endroits à la fois, selon différents regards, à différents moment. Superposer les couchesd de récits, c’est une  manière d’approcher le plus possible la vérité” explique-t-il. Cette volonté d’envisager ce qui se passe sous différents angles est chez lui naturelle: “Je suis en permanence haïtien, congolais, français, allemand. Ca me permet d’avoir une grille de lecture plus fiable, plus sereine.(…)Aujourd’hui, Raoul Peck, qui a poussé le mimétisme jusqu’à arborer la même barbichette que Lumumba, se souvient encore de son arrivée au Congo et de son premier choc d’enfant: “J’arrivais avec des images de Blanc dans la tête. Je sortais d’un contexte “bourgeois”  influencé par les cultures française et américaine. Pour moi, l’Afrique, c’était Tarzan, et j’étais du côté de Tarzan, pas des sauvages”. Aussi, pour lui, c’est un devoir de véhiculer dans ses films une image positive de l’homme noir. “Les jeunes Noirs sont imprégnés d’images qui ne leur correspondent pas, qui ne sont pas les leurs. De plus, chaque fois qu’il y a un noir dans  une fiction à la télévision je tremble, car souvent ce sont des caricatures ou des personnages pas crédibles. Comment voulez-vous qu’à partir de ça les jeunes se forgent une image positive de leur histoire et d’eux-mêmes?Je suis sûr qu’en regardant Lumumba, la majorité des jeunes Burkinabés, Dominicains ou Haïtiens ont vu pour la première fois sur un écran des personnages qui leur ressemblaient et étaient aussi valorisants”.Pour le définir, Pierre Chevalier, le directeur de la fiction d’Arte, dit qu’il est “entre deux”. Avant de préciser: “Entre Blanc et Noir, si j’ose dire”. Réponse de l’intéressé: “C’est une chance de pouvoir voir les choses en dedeans et en dehors. Je ne le vis pas comme une schizophrénie. Par exemple, dans Corps plongés, une fiction sur le thème de la mémoire et de l’exil, réalisée en 1998 pour Arte, je souhaitais traiter des difficultués d’être noir dans une société euro-centriste. En parler frontalement, c’était prendre le risque d’être caricatural. Ma position “entre deux” m’a aidé à aborder le sujet de façon détournée, plus décontractée.”

M’Bow, Amadou M. 1985. Introduction au débat général sur Plan 1984-89 à la quatrième session of la Conference Générale. Paris: UNESCO.

McAndrew, M. 1993. The Integration of Ethnic Minority Students Fifteen Years after Bill 101: Some Issues Confronting Montreal’s French Language Public Schools. Montréal: Université de Montréal, Centre d’Etudes Ethniques.
McArthur, Tom. 1998. The English Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
McCann, Colum.1998. This Side of Brightness. London: Phoenix House.

brilliant novel I warmly recommend as one of the best I read since Garp!

p.3: They arrive at dawn in their georgraphy of hats. A dark field of figures, stalks in motion, bending towards the docklands.
Scattered at first in the streets of Brooklyn – they have come by trolly and ferry and elevated train – they begin to gather together in a wave.
(…) Some men have big ,oustaches that move like  prairie grasses above their lips. Others are young and raw from razors. All of them have faces hollozed by the gravity of their work – they smoke furiously, with the knowledge of those who might be dead in just  a few hours.

McCutcheon, Andrew. 1991. Victoria’s Multicultural Agenda. In Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change, edited by D. Goodman, D. J. O’Hearn and C. Wallace-Crabbe. Melbourne: Scribe.

McGroarty, Mary. 1996. Multilingualism in the U.S. federal system: equity or expediency? Paper read at American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) Conference, March, at Chicago, Illinois.

___1997. Language policy in the USA: National Values, Local Loyalties, Pragmatic Pressures. In Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges, edited by W. Eggington and H. Wren. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

McMurchy, Megan. 1994. The Documentary. In Australian Cinema, edited by S. Murray. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
McSweeney, Bill. 2003. Flawed US Perspectives. the Irish Time, June 21, 2003, 13.

Meewis, M. (2010). Adapting to the subaltern: colonial Management of linguistic Diversity in the Belgian Congo (1880-1960). “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, Free State University.

Mehedi, Mustapha. 1999. L’éducation multiculturelle et interculturelle et la protection des minorités. Revue Québécoise de Droit International 12 (1):25-32.

Michel, Véronique. 2020. “Les Ménines.” In, edited by Historia del Arte Grupo. Zoom.

Ce tableau est une pièce maîtresse de l’histoire de l’art, tant dans sa réalisation plastique que dans son intention. Velasquez est né en 1599 à Séville et mort en 1660 à Madrid. Les ménines étaient des demoiselles d’honneur, au service des infantes, donc de la famille royale. Ce tableau a été peint à la fin de sa vie. Le ‘regardeur’ se trouve plongé dans une scène de l’Alcazar, vieux château de 8 siècles. Velasquez contribue à l’aura internationale de la peinture espagnole après celle de la littérature grâce à Cervantes.

En histoire de l’art, il a pour précurseurs El Greco, Murillo, Alonso Cano, Zurbarran etc). C’est un artiste qui arrive à la Cour Royale très tôt. Remarqué par le Comte Olivarès (andalou également) puis immédiatement reconnu par Philippe IV, jeune souverain, très grand amateur d’art comme tous les rois catholiques espagnols, pour l’ampleur et la réalité de ses personnages. Le roi cherchait une grande figure pour son mécénat royal et Vélasquez est sommé de s’occuper des collections et chateaux royaux. Il a mené une existence bien remplie, dépositaire de l’immense confiance du roi et des grandes familles aristocratiquesLa Cour royale est raidie par une étiquette comportementale bourguignonne à l’origine, adoptée par les Habsbourg et qui se caractérise par la rigueur castratrice des libertés. A l’Alcazar, il n’existe aucun brillant comparable au faste français de l’époque avec lequel il est en total contraste. Or ce portrait est fait à l’époque de la construction de Vaux-Le-Vicomte par Fouquet.

Vélasquez s’y sent très à l’aise, très assuré, comme chez lui! Très proche du roi d’Espagne dès 1623. De par sa propre origine aristocratique et son éducation, il se permet plus de libertés que Zurbaran et Murillo. Par exemple, il se représente lui-même.

Jusqu’à la fin du Moyen-Age, l’artiste est considéré comme un artisan. Dans ce tableau, il se représente avec le Cordon de Santiago visible. C’est un tableau d’une immense modernité et laisse interloqué. Ce sujet interpelle encore les historiens de l’art et les conservateurs du Prado. Ce tableau est un mystère qui pose question depuis 1656: qui regarde quoi? Il pose la question du regardeur et du peintre, de leur lien, qui est d’actualité depuis le début du XXe siècle

Vélasquez, brillant, fait retomber son brillant sur la Cour: il s’accorde dans ce tableau une place primordiale, fière, alors que le couple royal est seulement en reflet.

Luca Giordano, grand penseur, a parlé de théologie de la peinture. Ce tableau serait le Graal de la création picturale. Le portraitiste Thomas Lawrence parle de philosophie de l’art. Goya, Manet et Picasso ont tous rendu hommage à l’importance de la figure de Velasquez, au reflet du miroir, à la figure du majordome, de l’Infante. Dans le Musée Picasso de Barcelone, on voit comment Picasso a décliné ces détails. Ce dernier a, en effet, été envoyé en 1897 copier les grands maîtres du Prado et il y reviendra à la fin de sa vie.

Le sujet du tableau est l’Infante qui rend visite peut-être à ses parents dont Velasquez est en train de faire le portrait. Or c’est loin d’être aussi simple.

On ne peut dissocier une oeuvre de son contexte historico-politique. Vélasquez se démarque des autres peintres, de part sa naissance noble et son passé dans l’atelier de Pacheco, exemple incarné de l’art à l’époque. Il devient son gendre dès 1618 à Séville, ville de brassage culturel et géographique qui a une plus grande habitude de l’altérité. Il a été intégré à la corporation des peintres (avec droit à son propre atelier et apprentis). L’art de cette période était jusque là tourné vers l’édification des autochtones du Nouveau Monde, sauf Vélasquez qui en fera très peu de sujets religieux. Séville a donné de grands maîtres, notamment du mysticisme espagnol initié par St Jean de la Croix et Ste Thérèse d’Avila. Les thèmes récurrents de l’époque sont l’immaculée conception, notamment pour Murillo. Vélasquez est plus intéressé par le réel et le réalisme. Alors que les personnages bibliques sont les idéaux de beauté jusqu’au Caravage qui va imposer un nouveau language plastique.

Il est influencé par Alonso Cano, artiste de la mise en profondeur, de la maîtrise de la couleur, notamment le traitement du jaune et du gris, un mur de couleurs pour représenter son roi, qu’on retrouvera chez Manet. Egalement influencé par Juan Martinez Montanez. Il est également influencé par Herrera et Ribeira, donc indirectement par le Caravage.

Voir son tabeau des Pèlerins d’Emmaus. Velazquez est un homme libre obsédé par le réalisme comme en témoigne son adoration des Mages au Prado avec un bébé très réaliste, touchant, avec sa mère, jeune femme du peuple aux mains épaisses qui témoigne de sa parfaite maîtrise.

Voir son tableau Les Buveurs ou le triomphe de Bacchus. Qui est au premier plan? qui est de face, de profil de dos, regards interrogateurs et regards directs, la frise (défilé de personnages)…En 1629, il est envoyé en Italie sur une suggestion de Rubens de passage à Madrid (Rembrandt, Titien, Velasquez sont des diplomates!). Il y restera jusqu’au début 1631 et c’est une soupape, une respiration hors de la cour royale, étouffante et austère (d’autant plus à cause de la contre-réforme). Vélasquez va à Gênes, Venise, Rome au moment où l’art Romain est en pleine exhubérance qui lui inspire un système de composition déroulant en largeur ample une succession de personnages, composition unique de lignes verticales et horizontales. Trame abstraite du tableau qui revêt d’une immense intérêt pour son langage ultra contemporain. Ce tableau est l’aboutissement de nombreux tableaux sur la vie de Cour. Vélasquez voudra retourner in Italie mais le roi le lui interdira car il y est resté trop longtemps.

Ce tableau a été analysé par l’ancienne conservatrice de la peinture du XVIIe siècle du Prado, Manuela Mena Marquès, spécialiste de la peinture italienne du XVIIe siècle qui l’a explorée au rayon X. Au départ, l’infante Marguerite Thérèse, née en 1651 avait un jeune garçon qui lui tendait un bâton de commandement. Il s’agissait de Philippe Prosper d’Autriche mort en bas age. Philippe IV avait été marié avec Elisabeth de France, morte en 1644 et avait épousé sa nièce Marianne d’Autriche. Leur premier enfant était dépositaire de tous leurs espoir. Or avant sa naissance, Philippe IV s’était résigné à donner le pouvoir à sa fille, future reine d’espagne. Le sens de ce tableau a été transformé pour des question d’horétabe du pouvoir. Cependant, cette hypothèse reste fragile.

Chaque personnage est reconnaissable. Don José Nieto (chambellan) arrête son geste (il allait partir, est dans l’embrasure de la porte), l’Infante est arrêtée dans sa révérence, comme la ménine à sa droite. Tout le monde semble surprie par une arrivée…du couple royal peut-être, mais alors Vélasquez n’est pas en train de les peindre. Est-il en train d’effectuer des retouches? Vélasquez tient peut-être compte du regardeur d’une oeuvre d’art, nous incluant dans la scène. Pourquoi la ménine ne réagit pas comme celle de droite? Le chien ne regarde pas et la ménine de gauche, Marcella, continue à parler contrairement à l’homme inconnu. La naine nous regarde, narquoise. Il y a plusieurs entrées de lumière. Au XVIIe siècle, les miroirs sont très peu réfléchissant. L’hypothèse de savoir si le reflet peut être ce que Vélasquez est en train de peindre.

Michel, Véronique. (2020). Le David de Michel-Ange. G. H. d. Arte. Barcelona, Zoom.

La statue du David est un peu fragile à présent, regardez son pied gauche un peu branlant…L’original est à l’Academia alors que sa copie est sur la Piazza della Signoria.
VM brosse le décor historique et artistique de l’époque:
l’oeuvre date de 1501-1504, lors du retour de l’artiste à Florence après la chute de la théocratie de Savonarole.
David est un thème récurrent dans l’art au moment où M.A. sculpte le sien. C’est le pur héros biblique et l’incarnation d’un dieu antique.
Un siècle avant lui, Donatello, autre sculpteur emblématique de Florence, avait dejà fait un chef d’oeuvre qu’on peut contempler au Palazzo Bargello de Florence. On se trouve à la fin de l’histoire médiévale. Michel Ange lui greffe une dimension de héros antique avec des qualités et vertus humaines, c’est l’incarnation de la renaissance.
Cela a débuté avec les portraits très réalistes de Donatello et de Giotto en peinture, on jette un nouveau regard sur l’homme.
David, selon la bible, est appelé à la cour de Saul pour ses dons musicaux.
Dans la sculpture de Donatello, il faut noter le pied de David sur le bas du visage de Goliath. Donatello lui-même a été inspiré par le visage d’Antinoe, amant d’Hadrien. En tout cas, il le représente en éphèbe antique, idéal de beauté androgyne. A noter, le contraposto, ce déhanchement caractéristique de l’art occidental. La jambe raide représente l’équilibre et la jambe pliée le dynamisme.
Pour celui de MA, dans le même lieu (Florence) et sur le même thème, on est un siècle d’histoire intense plus tard.
L’ascension des Medicis: elle se profile sur deux fonds politiques, celui d’une Europe du sud sous le joug arabe (de 711 à 1492) influencée par la traduction des textes antiques parvenus par le biais des traductions arabes et la République aristocratique.
Cosme de Medicis était le commanditaire de Donatello alors que dans le cas de Michel Angelo, c’est la République de Florence qui passe commande.
Les Medicis sont hors jeu au moment où MA fait sa sculpture. Cette famille importante est dans la course au pouvoir depuis le Moyen-Age. Elle a pris la défense du Popolo Minuto contre les Milites (aristocratie). Ce popolo est composé de petits artisans, ouvriers, qui sont les véritables artisans économiques de la ville: marchands, banquiers et même aristocrates en ont besoin. Le District de Florence couvre une zone très large comprenant Arezzo, Cortone, Pise et Livourne, c’est une grande puissance. Cosme est à la ête de la ville de 1434 à 1464, puis Pier lui succède jusqu’en 1469 avant Lorenzo jusqu’en 1492. Ils insufflent une esthétique et un esprit nouveaux…d’où le terme de renaissance. Nouvelle naissance de l’intellectualité.
Savonarole est le contemporain direct de Léonard de Vinci (1452-1498). Né à Ferrare, il arrive à Florence in 1491 et commence à haranguer les foules du petit peuple. C’est un homme prophétique dans le sens du terme proférer. C’est une réminiscence de la foi du moyen-age. Il veut mettre en place une dictature théocratique. D’où son Bucher des Vanités dans lequel finiront quelques chefs-d’oeuvre de Boticelli entre autres. Il est anti-renaissance, anti-pensée libre. Il fustige la Florence corrompue, véritable Sodome et Gomorrhe d’après lui (ce qui est loin d’être le cas!). Il est avant-courreur du schisme protestant qui aura lieu dix ans plus tard avec Martin Luther (1517). Il dénonce la déliquescence des moeurs. MA s’est enfui de Florence et a beaucoup réfléchi sur lui-même. Il n’était pas si sûr de lui, c’est un artiste saturnien (tellurique). Après Savonarole, le monde a changé, vers plus de simplicité, moins de couleurs (le protestantisme tuera la couleur, cf. Franz Halz, austérité visuelle. Ce sérieux se retrouve aussi dans le visage du David de MA. C’est un retour aux vraies valeurs, à la gravité et à la simplicité. Le David est un homme puissant, déterminé, rigoureux. Les valeurs morales sont ravivées mais MA conserve un regard vers le monde antique abhorré par Savonarole. On exalte les vertus antiques républicaines, c’est un moment de reconstruction.
M.A. est le grand héritier de la sculpture du siècle.
Les partisans de Savonarole fuient et les Enragés, ennemis des Medicis sont au pouvoir, appuyés par le Gonfalonier Pier Soderni qui fut au pouvoir de 1502 à 1512. C’est une oligarchie qui vient remplacer la théocratie, elle soutient Machiavel et commande, via la Corporation des Laineurs un David à MA.
On peut se demander pourquoi on n’a pas fait appel à Da Vinci. Peut-être parce que ce dernier fait moins autorité….Il est occupé en 1510 par le plafond de la Sixtine, puis en 1530 par le Jugement Dernier.
MA a été formé dans l’atelier de Guilandaio. Pendant son absence de Florence (sa fuite?), il est allé à Venise, Bologne et Rome où il a sculpté un Bacchus (au Musée Bargello aujourd’hui). La corporation des laineurs a fourni le bloc de marbre qui avait déjà été ébauché par Agostino di Ducio. La sculpture fait plus de 4,30 mètres, cinq avec le socle. C’est un blog étroit. David déterminé et viril. Elle était placée à l’origine devant le Palazzo Vecchio.

Michel, Véronique. 2020. “La Jeune Fille au Verre de Vin.” In Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.

Siècle d’Or de la peinture hollandaise (Rembrandt, Ruysdael, Hals). Totalement différent du siècle d’or espagnol. La Hollande est depuis 1648 une coalition de sept provinces unies. Il s’agit d’un pays moderne par rapport au reste du monde. Vermeer a très peu peint, très lentement, guidé par la nécessité d’une exécution précise, de la lumière, et d’une trame géométrique très organisée, poussée et précise où on retrouve de grandes verticales et de grandes horizontales. Vermeer joue beaucoup du symbole. Loin d’être seulement le quotidien néerlandais, son message est truffé de messages secondaires quant à l’ordre moral et l’avancement de son pays. Ses tableaux sont autant de grands espaces de reflexion sur la vie quotidienne et intérieure de ses personnages. Jeux de rapports entre individus. cf. Gabriel Metsu et son quotidien basique avec la Peleuse de Pommes, domestique habillée modestement mais très correctement. Contrairement à Zurbaran, Ribeira et Velasquez qui dépeignent des petites gens misérables. Chez Metsu, la femme n’est pas indigente grâce à la structure sociale et urbaine néerlandaise. L’Etat néerlandais, “éponge qui prend l’eau” est constitué de “pays toujours en sursis” mais sa société est en bon état physique. C’est le seul état en lien avec le Japon à cette époque, fait notable! Derrière l’art de Vermeer et Metsu, il y a l’idée que l’individu est responsable de l’Etat dans lequel il vit. En 1648, la Hollande se détache du joug espagnol. Les bourgeois sont contents d’eux-mêmes. Chacun a sa place et fait bien son travail. Importance du llibre arbitre. Cf. le poème de Jacob Cats, le Lafontaine hollandais décrit ainsi le charme particulier d’un voyage en Zélande: “Ce peuple est laborieux et vit bien, la terre est très fertile, la culture variée, et le travail assidu des habitans a fait de ces îles que la nature leur avait livrées à l’état d’affreux marécages autant de jardins perpétuels dont l’aspect est ravissant en été. Ajoutez les senteurs marines que tous les vents apportent, les souvenirs historiques à chaque pas réveillés, et vous comprendrez le charme particulier d’un voyage en Zélande, où les grandes scènes autres que celles de l’océan sont rares, mais où le détail pittoresque, instructif ou amusant surabonde. On y respire je ne sais quelle atmosphère d’énergie persévérante, résignée à la lutte, confiante dans le résultat, tout à fait d’accord avec l’écusson significatif de la province, un lion nageant, et pour devise : Luctor et emergo, je lutte et je surnage.”
Le vin symbolise la perte de conscience et le risque. cf. Metsu, la Femme Buveuse de Vin: elle a moins de tenue. L’oeil du regardeur se fait un peu espion.
Alors que le XVIIe siècle espagnol des Habsbourg est une monarchie absolue qui a du mal avec son passé de 711 à 1492 et sa coexistence des juifs et des arabes au point de se vouloir à présent le meilleur élève du christianisme, pour les Hollandais on en est au christianisme réformateur qui n’admet pas la faiblesse, la séduction, l’entrainement à boire de la jeune fille. Cf. la Jeune fille assoupie (MET) avec son intérieur bourgeois, confortable mais simple où l’importation de richesses symbolisée par le tapis de soie.
A la même époque, 1657, Nicolas Fouquet édifie Vaux-Le-Vicomte qui lui vaudra sa chute et qui sera récupérée par Louis XIV
En Hollande, pas d’aristocracie, mais une bourgeoisie avec ses propres codes. Dans le tableau du MET, il y avait un homme et un chien. C’est la seconde thématique commune à la Buveuse de vin et à la Jeune Fille Assoupie.
La cruche est très significative. Voir le Christ dans la maison de Marthe et Marie (Scottish National Gallery), différence dans le coude et la main sous la joue.
Dans la morale médiévale, la paresse (acédie) est alors perçue comme un des sept péchés capitaux avec l’orgueil, l’envie, la colère, l’avarice, la gourmandise et la luxure. Dans le tableau du MET, la présence du désordre est signifiante. Lien entre la présence de vin dans la cruche. Cf. Jan Steen et les Conséquences de l’intempérance: intérieur cossu mais totalement désordonné.
Les murs de Vermeer sont souvent porteurs de messages: les cartes géographiques marquent la prééminence de la Hollande en tant que grande nation maritime. Le tableau du MET fait référence à César van Everdingen avec les Mutti puisqu’on peut entr’apercevoir un putto masqué.
Cela fait à peine dix ans que les Pays-Bas se sont débarassés du joug espagnol, de ces Grands d’Espagne qui asservissent le peuple. Ce que Vermeer et ses semblables mettent en avant, ce sont la prospérité et la modernité comme en témoigne l’Interieur avec Femme au Clavecin d’Emanuel de Witte ou le Still Life with Turkey Pie de Pieter Claez.
La Buveuse de Vin va-t-elle se laisser aller à la lascivité?
Le Duc d’Olivarès est à la tête de la corruption espagnole. A la même époque, Pieter Hoch représente la famille hollandaise et ses valeurs protestantes tueuses de couleur. A paris, ce ne sont à cette époque que boue d’immondices, capharnaüm humain et social.
Dans le tableau Le Soldat et la Jeune fille riant de la Frick Collection, contraste entre la lumière et l’ombre, la puissance et l’incitation à boire.
On remarque dans Le Verre de vin la même robe et les mêmes circonstances. Il y a une fenêtre entr’ouverte. Un vitrail représente la Vertu, l’une des vertus cardinales avec la prudence, la sagesse, l’intelligence, la prévoyance et…l’intempérance représentée par ses attributs (équerre et bride). La jeune fille est assise à angle droit, elle agit juste pour maîtriser ses passions. Dans le tableau derrière elle, un homme au nez pointu, le mari de la jeune femme, qui travaille pour la hollande et compte sur sa femme.
Attention à ‘l’élixir d’amour’: au XVIIe siècle, la relation entre vin et narcose pour favoriser la séduction est évidente. Mais la présence de citrons sur la table est là pour symboliser le fait de couper les effets du filtre d’amour et de la cruche sensuelle sur un tissu d’un blanc virginal…

Michel, Véronique. 2020. “Rothko.” In, edited by Grupo Historia del Arte. Barcelona: Zoom.

Ce peintre s’est suicidé en 1970. Il appartenait au mouvement expressionniste abstrait, color field painting, ses oeuvres principales datent des années 50-60 et racontent les éléments relevant de la sensibilité de cet écorché vif. Rothko était un immense dépressif. Né en Russie (actuelle Lettonie) dans une ville où la moitié de la population était juive dans la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle. Il appartenait à la génération du sionisme philosophique comme beaucoup dans la communauté juive. Issu d’un milieu juif traditionnel, il a connu les pogroms qui sévissaient sur le territoire russe et sur les trois plus violents, deux ont eu lieu de son vivant, le premier avait eu lieu en 1881-84, le second de 1903 à 1906 (cf. photo) et le troisième eut lieu en 1917-21 en même temps que l’instauration du système communiste (les juifs étaient perçus comme étrangers dans le pays dans lequel ils habitaient) mais Rothko avait déjà quitté le pays. Il a vécu tout enfant le deuxième pogromme qui a trouvé un écho de la part de sa famille. Cette tragédie habitait Rothko. Il parlera du sentiment d’être habité par la peur dans un environnement léthal des Tsars Alexandre III et Nicolas II.
Alexandre II avait été un réformiste qui avait souhaité faire basculer la Russie vers un Etat moderne, mais Alexandre III a contrecarré ses projet en souhaitant en finir avec ce rève d’émancipation et revenir à l’ancien régime comme Nicolas II qui restaure l’autocratie.
Rothko est totalement habité par la question juive.
Dans les années 60, l’abstraction vient contrecarrer l’idée de l’académisme selon laquelle une oeuvre est réussie lorsqu’elle est “bien peinte”, Rothko est né dans une société archaïque d’un point de vue artistique. Une fois extrait de son espace géographique d’origine, Rothko prendra le chemin inverse à l’académisme. Il n’est pas vrai qu’on puisse faire une bonne peinture à propos de rien. Il s’intéresse à l’espace sensoriel expérimental. Nous affirmons que le sujet est essentiel et le seul sujet qui vaille la peine est le tragique et l’éternel.
Mais ses oeuvres ne s’arrêtent pas à ce constat. Regarder Rothko, ce n’est pas être regardeur, c’est vivre une expérience. Être juif, c’est effectuer beaucoup de gestes en incarnation du souvenir du peuple juif. Le spirituel entre dans la vie de Rothko lors du second pogrom. Son père va contraindre Mark Rothko à mener une vie religieuse intense. Il va a Heder, à la synagogue, apprend le Talmud ce qui marquera sa condition juive de manière plus profonde. Ce tournant aura un double impact, funeste (la peur) et formel avec le Shoresh, la racine (consonnes seules sont écrites). Il est interdit de s’arrêter au sens d’un mot qui est lu. Chaque mot, chaque idée n’a pas de fin, c’est le principe de la quête éternelle. La peinture va au-delà de la lumière. On parle pour lui de couleur lumière ou de lumière couleur.
Dans la Russie très grégaire, un principe s’intègre, lié à la sagesse par une loi naturelle: dans un principe, il y a son contraire. Rothko, précédé par les pères de l’abstraction pure que sont les russes Kandinsky (jeu de formes et de couleurs sans ancrage dans le réel) et Malevich.
Il n’y a pas chez eu l’esprit anarchiste qui règne à Montmartre mais une rupture totale avec l’art ancien.
En 1910, son père émigre seul, puis ses deux frères un an plus tard. Rothko lui, demeure en Russie avec sa mère, la peur au ventre. Il quittera finalement la Russie avec sa mère et sa soeur. Nouvelle tragédie: son père meurt en 1914. Rothko, excellent étudiant va à Yale.
En 1923, il découvre la peinture et se forme seul en visitant expositions, galeries, musées et ateliers d’artistes). Il prend des cours de peintures et puise, dès ses premiers tableaux, dans le langage de la couleur. Son premier maître, Arshile Gorky (né en Arménie Turque en 1904) qui a connu les cellules nationalistes turques anti-arméniennes qui ont conduit au génocide de son peuple, donc à son traumatisme similaire à celui de Rothko. Arshile a perdu la parole au départ de son père lorsqu’il avait 4 ans et ne l’a retrouvé que sous la menace de mort de son maître d’école.
Gorky passe par la figuration primitive pour aller vers l’abstraction. Pour Rothko, c’est un abandon progressif du figuratif, plus géométrie, future structure de l’art moderne dans laquelle Cézanne a joué un rôle primordial. (note de DRM, cela m’a fait penser à Anselme Kiefer). Plus cela va mal dans une société, plus on va vers l’abstrait pour évacuer la tragédie. Cette théorie se vérifie dans l’histoire. Plus la tension se manifeste, plus les artistes fuient le réel. En 1945, abandon du figuratif: que voulez-vous peindre après la Shoah ? cf. Dubuffet, Lanscoy, Marcussier…nous nous sommes vantés de détenir le savoir et avons abouti à deux guerres mondiales. On retrouve les repères dans l’art brut, des aliénés, des enfants…
Abstraction: elle apparaît dans les années 40-50 chez Rothko. Il a démarré tard, contrairement à Picasso. Ses champs de couleur-lumière donnent des vibrations. Sa peinture émerge parallèlement à l’action painting, la peinture gestuelle de Pollock, l’abstraction colorée américaine.
Rothko a commencé à rédiger sa pensée sur l’art.
En 1970, après son suicide, son atelier va être gelé et ses enfant vont exhumer et compiler un ouvrage à partir des ses écrits. La Réalité de l’artiste (Editions Champs Arts). Rothko n’y fait pas de la grande littérature. Il est le regardeur dans son itinérance, sa peinture comme processus et devenir. L’art premier n’est pas fait pour être une oeuvre d’art mais quelque chose de sacré. Il exige la participation de l’ulitisateur et de la société dans l’oeuvre d’art. Il s’agit d’un nouveau rapport avec l’oeuvre d’art.
Déjà Malevitch avec son Carré Noir sur fond noir, avait atteint une dimension cosmique une immatérialité, l’émotion du regardeur.
Rothko est né dans une culture où l’immatériel débouche sur une infinité. Ce sont des voies indéfinies vers lesquelles va la sensibilité du regardeur. La peinture est un processus, un devenir, le contraire d’un univers clos.
Rothko a été sublimé par Masacchio, Giotto, Vinci, Rembrand notamment avec les Pellerins d’Emaus, avant tout un tableau de lumière. Il a une idée précise de la présentation de ses oeuvres comme au Portland Art Museum. Il faut pouvoir faire l’expérience d’être absorbé par la couleur dans un autre monde à la manière d’Alice au Pays des Merveilles. Nous omme l’encre absorbée par la fibre du papier buvard qu’est l’oeuvre. Ses tableaux sont colorés, grand et sans cadre, ils sont intimes et intenses, à l’opposé du décoratif afin de provoquer un glissement à l’intérieur de l’oeuvre. Il souhaite instaurer une véritable transaction avec le le spectateur.
Son grand ami était Clyfford Still, également auteur de champs colorés et “déchirures”. Rothko a été passionné par Matisse et sa manière figurative de fair eparler lumière et couleur.

Mikes, George. 1968. Mortal Passion. 2nd ed. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books.

39-41: Look here, I said to the professor, are there any Americans around here at all?
Americans? exclaimed Sam, too, as if he had heard the word for the first time.
My dear Matyas, said the Professor solemnly, I doubt if Borsch even knows any Americans. I am sure he has seen some, but I doubt if he has spoken to many. Nor have I, for that matter. Well, there are a few exceptions, prize specimens (…). I am astonished that an old émigré like yourself should ask such a naive question. Maybe it’s different in Britain; I wouldn’t know. But here, my dear Matyas, Americans are purely peripheral in our lives. We live in ghettoes. In business life, I.V. meets an occasional American here and there; he can’t help dealing with Americans – although they often turn out to be Mexicans, Bolivians, Italians and Germans. He also employs Americans -every office, I am told, needs one or two people who can speak the language of the land without doing violence to every sentence and debasing every word. But these Americans are not really part of life; they belong to the scenery, like the bay over there or the Empire State Building; they are not essential parts of real life. We only meet Hungarians. Or ex-Hungarians (…).
New York may be a vast American metropolis for most people, the professor continued, but for us it is a small Hungarian village. Or rather a middle-sized Hungarian town, with its own dignitaries, its own special snobberies, its won Press, its own gossip and jealousies, crimes, jokes and tragedies. America is only the background to this life: its venue that’s all. Our life is inside American only in the sense that a small concentric circle is inside a bigger circle: we copy the Americans, we take over their habits; we go to their super-markets; we buy their products and drive on their super highways; we imitate their manners, we buy new outfits at Easter and eat turkey on Thanksgiving Day. In some ways we are much more American than the Americans, but it is only our children -if any- who will be real Americans and become integral parts of the air-conditioned nightmare (…) it was easy to emigrate from Budapest to London;(…) it was child’s play to emigrate from London to New York; but that no matter how many years he spends here and no matter how hard he tries: to emigrate from New York into American is impossible to him”

Miller, David. 1995. On Nationality. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Miller, Virginia. 1986. The Micmac: A Maritime Woodland Group. In Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience, edited by B. Morrison and W. R. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.
Mills, Charles W. 1998. Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.

Milner, Jean-Claude. 1995. Introduction à une science du langage. Vol. 300, Points Essais. Paris: Editions du Seuil.

___2006. Le juif de savoir, Points Essais: Grasset.

Mitchell-Kernan, Claudia. 1969. Language behavior in a black urban community. Berkeley, California: Language Behavior Research Laboratory.

Mizubayashi, Akira  (2011), Une langue venue d’ailleurs (Coll. L’un et l’autre: Gallimard ) 280.

Découvert via une note sur SLonFB de Francine Mancini (http://www.francinemancini.ch/ et https://www.facebook.com/francine.mancini1)  qui a publié un article du blog http://5emedecouverture.wordpress.com/2011/02/26/akira-mizubayashi-une-langue-venue-d-ailleurs/

Le jour où je me suis emparé de la langue française, j’ai perdu le japonais pour toujours dans sa pureté originelle. Ma langue d’origine a perdu son statut de langue d’origine. J’ai appris à parler comme un étranger dans ma propre langue. Mon errance entre les deux langues a commencé… Je ne suis donc ni japonais ni français. Je ne cesse finalement de me rendre étranger à moi-même dans les deux langues, en allant et en revenant de l’une à l’autre, pour me sentir toujours décalé, hors de place. Mais, justement, c’est de ce lieu écarté que j’accède à la parole ; c’est de ce lieu ou plutôt de ce non-lieu que j’exprime tout mon amour du français, tout mon attachement au japonais. 
Je suis étranger ici et là et je le demeure.
Akira Mizubayashi a dix-neuf ans lorsqu’il apprend le français à l’université au Japon. C’est alors une langue étrangère. A l’époque, le japonais était pour lui une langue « fatiguée, pâle, étiolée ». Le français lui est alors apparu comme une issue face à ce japonais malmené par tout un peuple. Il s’est alors lancé dans son apprentissage et est venu suivre des études en France. C’est là-bas qu’il a rencontré celle qui est son épouse. Depuis, le français est devenue son autre langue.
Akira Mizubayashi nous parle de son apprentissage de la langue française. Son amour pour notre langue ne peut que séduire les amoureux de la langue française. Il apporte un regard extérieur très intéressant, un regard profondément marqué par sa nationalité japonaise. Il nous explique comment sa culture japonaise l’empêche d’employer certaines de nos tournures comme les expressions appellatives (Bonjour, ma chérie. Comment vas-tu, papa ?) ou tout simplement Bonjour ! que nous utilisons pour saluer mêmes des inconnus, chose inconcevable au Japon.
L’autre amour de l’auteur est la musique, qui est omniprésente dans ce récit comme elle l’est dans la vie de l’auteur. Le parallèle qu’il fait entre la langue et la musique est très intéressant.
Dans toutes les langues du monde sans doute résonne de la musique ; des tremblements d’émotions se font entendre en elles à travers les mots prononcés dans l’infinie variation des inflexions vocales. La vie où s’entremêlent les sons de la nuit, les silences du jour et tous les bruissements du cœur comme du monde sensible est un gigantesque réservoir de musique. Alors, la langue, la plus fidèle et la plus profonde compagne de la vie, ne peut être elle-même autre chose que de la musique. Seulement, d’une langue à l’autre, la musique ne s’élève pas de la même manière. Chaque langue a ses lieux propres, ses situations singulières pour faire vibrer sa musique.
Le rôle du père a été déterminant pour Akira et son frère. C’est grâce à lui qu’ils ont pu s’élever. Leur père n’hésite pas à investir de l’argent et du temps en ce sens.
Pour les livres, je disposais d’un budget illimité, si j’ose dire. Mon père me disait :- Aucune marchandise n’est meilleur marché qu’un livre, à condition qu’on le lise. Tu achèteras autant de livres que tu voudras, si tu en as besoin et si tu les lis. Rien de plus cher, par contre, qu’un livre, si on ne le lit pas puisqu’on ne peut même pas s’en servir comme papier hygiénique. »
Akira Mizubayashi a une personnalité très attachante. Son enthousiasme, sa sincérité et son amour du français m’ont séduite. J’ai eu un vrai coup de cœur pour ce livre. C’est le genre de livres où l’on souligne de nombreux passages et qu’on sait qu’on lira et relira.
Un spectacle de rue étonnant, une musique sublime, un film bouleversant, un tableau magnifique, une joyeuse conversation amicale dans un café, une belle page de roman : tout cela pouvait irriguer et fertiliser la langue qui me traversait désormais de part en part, car tous ces chocs esthétiques suscitaient des mots et libéraient la parole ; la langue que je cultivais en moi comme une plante précieuse se développait, se ramifiait, se revigorait au contact d’une source de désir qui se cachait dans ces moments d’émerveillement.

Moffett, Samuel E. 1972. The Americanization of Canada. Toronto.
Moisy, Claude. 1996. L’Amérique en marche arrière. Vol. 1, Département Hachette Références. Paris: Hachette Livre.

Mongin, Olivier. 1995. Le spectre du multiculturalisme américain: Retour sur une controverse: du “politiquement correct ” au multiculturalisme. Esprit (Juin 1991):83-87.

Montgomery, Michael. 1999. Eiteenth-Century Sierra Leone English: Another exported variety of African American English. English World-Wide 1 (20):1-34.

Morawska, Ewa. 2005. Immigrants and Citizenship: An Ethnographic Assessment. Paper read at 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Migration and Citizenship, at Stockholm, Norra Latin, Aula 3d Floor.

Morgan, Marcyliena. 1998. More than an mood or an attitude: discourse and verbal genres in African-American Culture. In African-American English: Structure, History and Use, edited by S. S. Mufwene, J. R. Rickford, G. Bailey and B. John. London: Routledge.

Morrison, B., and Wilson R. 1986. Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.

Morrison, B., and Wilson R. 1986. On the Study of Native Peoples. In Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.

Moscato, M. , and Wittwer J. 1978. La Psychologie du Langage, Que-Sais-Je? Paris: PUF.

Mouillon, Philippe. 1995. Un voisinage mondial. In Identités, Cultures et Territoires, edited by J.-P. Saez. Paris: Desclée de Brouwer.

Mufwene, Slikoko S. 1997. Gullah Development: Myth and Socio-historical Evidence. In Language Variety in the South Revisited, edited by C. Berstein, T. Nunnally and R. Rabino: The University of Alabama Press.

___and John R. Rickford. 1998. Introduction to African-American English: Structure, History and Use. London: Routledge.
___ John R. Rickford, Guy Bailey, and Baugh John, eds. 1998. African-American English: Structure, History and Use. London: Routledge.

Muhlhausler, P. 1986. Pidgin and Creole Linguistics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Murray, Scott, ed. 1994. Australian Cinema. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Murray, Scott. 1994. Australian directors overseas 1970-1992. In Australian Cinema, edited by S. Murray. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Murray, Scott, Raffaele Caputo, and Claudine Thoridnet. 1994. Filmography: one hundred and fifty Australian films. In Australian Cinema, edited by S. Murray. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Musehane, N. (2010). Language shift: a Case of the department of safety and security (Police Service) in the Limpopo Province, SA. In Law. “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, Free State University.

Mutombo, Kanyana. 2002. Comment les Noirs se sont eux-mêmes oubliés à Strasbourg. Regards Africains (47/48):58-59.

___2002. Duel entre victimes: Juifs vs. Noirs… Regards Africains (47/48):62-63.

Mydans, Seth. 1999. Reluctantly, Australia opts to save the Queen. International Herald Tribune (New York Times Service), Monday, November 8, 1999, 1 &10.

2 replies

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s