cosmopolitanism

a blog on English and cultures in a cosmopolitan world

Bibliography with a B like Benjamin Barber

img_7236

!THE BIBLIOGRAPHIC SECTION IS  THE VERY REASON FOR WRITING THIS BLOG…ADDING BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTES. In red and italics…underlined numbers are the page numbers.

to access the other pages, click on the alphabetical link

Links to my bibliography from A to Z:

A      B (this page)    C     D     E     F     G     H        I     J     K     L     

M     N     O     P       Q       R     S     T     U     V     W/X/Y/Z


Thus sharing my finding with my colleagues and inviting you to do likewise!

Here’s a total list of my almost 2012 titles;-)

(AACLME), Australian Advisory Council on Languages and Multicultural Education (1991), ‘Language is good business’, (Melbourne: National Languages and Literacy Institute).
(AALC), Australian Language and Literacy Council (1994), ‘Speaking of business. The needs of business and industry for language skills’, (Canberra: National Board of Employment, Education and Training).
(de) Fontenay, Elisabeth (2011), Actes de Naissance (Sciences Humaines; Paris: Seuil).
(de)Toledo, Camille , 2009. Le Hêtre et le Bouleau. Essai sur la tristesse européenne (« Librairie du XXIe siècle »; Paris: Seuil ).
(ICMRP), Isan Culture Maintenance and Revitalization Program ‘Website’, [website], <http://icmrpthailand.org/en&gt;, accessed Nov. 29th 2012.
Abanto, Alicia (2011), ‘Informe defensorial No. 152 Aportes para una policia nacional EIB a favor de los pueblos indigenas del Peru.’ paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE 2011), Cusco, Peru.
Abbi, Anvita (ed.), (1996), Languages of tribal and indigenous peoples of India: the ethnic space (Delhi: Motilal Banarsidas).
Abelin, Peter (2012), ‘Daniel Cohn-Bendit in Basel: “Israeli und Palästinenser müssen ihre Traüme begrenzen!’ Tachles, 14 Sept., sec. Schweiz.
Abella, Irving and Troper, Harold (1991), None is Too Many (Toronto: Lester).
Abid-Houcine, Samira (2006), ‘Plurilinguisme en Algérie’, (Sidi Bel Abbès).
— (2007), ‘Enseignement et éducation en langues étrangères en Algérie: la compétition entre le français et l’anglais’, in Daphné Romy-Masliah and Larissa Aronin (eds.), L’anglais et les cultures: carrefour ou frontière? (54; Paris: Revue Droit et Cultures, L’Harmattan).
Abou, Sélim (1981), L’identité Culturelle: Relations interethniques et problèmes d’acculturation, ed. Pierre Vallaud (Collection Pluriel; Paris: Anthropos) 249.
Abu-Laban, Yasmeen and Stasiulus, Daiva (1992), ‘Ethnic pluralism under siege: popular and partisan opposition to multiculturalism’, Canadian Public Policy, 4 (18), 365-86.
Achard, P. (1993), La Sociologie du Langage (Que-Sais-Je?; Paris: PUF).
Ackerman, Bruce (1980), Social justice in the liberal state (New Haven: Yale University Press).
Adachi, Ken (1976), The Enemy that Never Was (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart).
Adams, Phillip (1994), ‘A cultural revolution’, in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin), 61-70.
Adelaar, S (1995), ‘Borneo as a crossroads for comparative Austronesian linguistics’, in P Bellwood, JJ Fox, and D Tryon (eds.), The Austronesians: historical and comparative perspectives, 75-94 (Canberra: Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies (ANU), Department of Anthropology).
Adelman, H., et al. (eds.) (1994), Immigration and Refugee Policy: Australia and Canada Compared (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press).
Adnan, A. H. M. (2010), ‘Losing language, losing identity, losing out – the case of Malaysian Orang Asli (native) children’.
Adnan, A. H. M. (2010), ‘“***k! It’s just the way we talk-lah!” Language, culture and identity in a Malaysian underground music community’.
Adnan, A. H. M. (2012), ‘Perdre sa langue, perde son identité, se perdre. Le cas des enfants Orang Asli (aborigènes) de Malaisie.’ Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 79-100.
Adorno, T. W. and ., Horkheimer. Max (2002), Dialectic of Enlightenment, trans. Edmund Jephcott. (Stanford: Stanford UP).
AFP-Jiji (1999), ‘Crocodile Dundee’s Death Puzzles the Police’, The Japan Times, Aug.6, p. 5.
Agarwal, S. (1995), Minorities in India: a study in communal process and minority rights (Jaipur: Arihant Publishing House).
Akcan, Sumru (2004), ‘Teaching Methodology in a French-Immersion Class’, Bilingual Research Journal, 28 (2), 267-77.
Alatis, J.E. and Staczek, J.J. (eds.) (1970), Perpectives on Bilingualism and Bilingual Education (Georgetown: Georgetown University Press).
Al-Azmeh, Aziz, et al. (2004), L’identité, ed. Nadia Tazi (French edn., Les Mots du Monde; Paris: Editions La Decouverte).
Al-Azmeh, Aziz (2004), ‘Une Question Post-Moderne’, L’identité (French edn., Les Mots du Monde; Paris: Editions La Decouverte), 11-24.
Ali, M.O. (2003), ‘Enseignement du Tamazight à Sidi Bel Abbès’, Le quotidien d’Oran, samedi 10 mai 2003, p. 13.
Alimi, Eitan Y. and Meyer, David S. (2012), ‘Seasons of Change: Arab Spring and Political
Opportunities’, Swiss Political Science Review : , 17 (4), 475-79.
Allievi, Stefano ( 2003), ‘Multiculturalism in Europe’, Muslims in Europe Post 9/11: Understanding and Responding to the Islamic World (St Antony’s College, Oxford).
Al-Mulhim, Abdulateef , 2012, Saturday 6 October, and am, Last Update 6 October 2012 2:53 (2012), ‘Forget Israel. Arabs are their own worst enemy’, Arab News, sec. op’ed.
Alvarez, Lizette (1997), ‘It’s the Talk of Nueva York: The Hybrid called Spanglish”‘, New York Times, 25 March.
Amador-Moreno, Carolina P and McCafferty, Kevin (2012), ‘Linguistic identity and the study of Emigrant Letters: Irish English in the making ‘, Lengua y migración / Language and Migration, 4 (2).
Amar, Akhil Reed (1998), The Bill of Rights (New Haven and London: Yale University Press) 412.
— (2000), ‘Allow the Electoral College to Do Its Usual Job, and Then Abolish It’, New York Times and International Herald Tribune, November 10, 2000, p. 8.
radio interview (1999) (France Inter).
Amon, Ulrich and Hellinger, Marlis (eds.) (1992), Status Change of Languages 1 vols. (Change of Language Structure and Language Status, 1; Berlin/London: Walter de Gruyter) 547 pp.
Amselle, Jean-Loup (2001), Vers un multiculturalisme français (Paris: Flammarion).
Anaya, S. James (1995), ‘The Capacity of International Law to Advance Ethnic or Nationality Rights Claims’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
Anderson, B (1983), Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (London: Verso).
Anderson, Elijah (1999), ‘The social situation of the black and white identities in the corporate world.’ in Michèle Lamont (ed.), The Cultural Territories of Race: Black and White Boundaries (University of Chicago Press), 3-29.
Anderson, Digby (2000), ‘When words change meaning -and do violence to the truth: Social affairs Unit has celebrated its 20th anniversary with a dictionary that analyses the linguistic abuses of political correctness’, The Daily Telegraph, Nov.23d, p. 28.
Andreas, Huyssen (1988), After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture and Postmodernism (London: Macmillan).
Andreoni, G (1967), ‘Australitalian’, University Studies in Australian, (5), 114-19.
Appel, René and Muysken, Pieter (1987), Language Contact and Bilingualism (London: Edward Arnold).
Archer, Margaret (2005), ‘Comments’, in Neil J. Smelser, University of California, Berkeley (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Sociology and Cultural Sciences (Folket Hus, Kongresshallen A: University of Warwick, UK).
Arendt, Hannah (1979 , 1951), The Origins of Totalitarianism (New York: Harcourt Brace.).
— (1993), Auschwitz et Jérusalem (Paris: Deuxtemps Tierce (Presses Pocket Agora)).
Arieli, Shaul (2011), People and Borders (Tel-Aviv: Kapaim) 477.
Arieli, Shaul (2012), ‘Abu Mazen wants a state, not the right of return: Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas sees the UN bid as his last, best chance to negotiate with Israel.’ Haaretz, 18.11.12.
Arieli, Shaul ‘Website’, [website], <http://www.shaularieli.com&gt;.
Armitage, A. (1995), Comparing the Policy of Aboriginal Assimilation: Australia, Canada and New Zealand (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press).
Aronin, Larissa and Barkon, Elisheva (2007), ‘L’anglais et les cultures: carrefour ou frontière?’ Droit et Cultures (54; Paris: L’Harmattan).
Asante, Mlefi Kete (1990), Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge (Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press).
ASCD (1987), ‘Building an Indivisible Nation: Bilingual Education in Context’, (Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development).
Ashworth, M. (1988), Blessed with Bilingual Brains: Education of Immigrant Children with English as a Second Language (Vancouver: Pacific Educational Press).
AssociatedPress, ‘L’anglais est la langue de l’avenir pour les Suisses, selon deux sondages’, AP Wire, dimanche 24 septembre 2000, 15h16.
Atkinson, Michael M. (ed.), (1993), Governing Canada: Institutions and Public Policy (Toronto: Harcourt Brace).
Attabi, Said (2012), ‘Algérie : paysage sociolinguistique et alternance codique’, El Watan.com, p. 1.
Auer, Peter (2012), ‘Standardization and diversification: the urban sociolinguistics of German’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Aufheide, Patricia (ed.), (1992), Beyond PC: Toward a Politics of Understanding (Cincinati: Graywolf Press).
August-Zarebska, Agnieszka (2010), ‘Judeo-Spanish proverbs as an example of the hybridity of Judezmo
language and Sephardic culture ‘, Languages in Contact 2010: A Book of Abstracts (Wroclaw: Philological School in Higher Education, Wrolaw (Poland)).
Australia (1982), ‘Towards a National Policy’, (Canberra: Department of Education).
— (1992), ‘A Matter of Survival: Language and Culture’, (Canberra: House of Representatives Enquiry into the Maintenance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages).
— (1994), ‘Asian Languages and Australia’s Economic Future’, (Council of Australian Governments).
Bader, Veit. (1995), ‘ Citizenship and exclusion: radical democracy, community and justice’, Political Theory, 2 (23), 211-46.
Baggioni, D., et al. (1992), Multilinguisme et développement dans l’espace francophone (Institut d’Etudes Créoles et Francophones et Didier Erudition).
Bailey, Guy, Maynor, Nathalie, and Cukor-Avila, Patricia (eds.) (1991), The emergence of Black English : Text and Commentary (African-American English: Structure, History and Use, Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins).
Bailey, Guy and Thomas, Erik (1998), ‘Some aspects of African American Vernacular English Phonology’, in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Routledge), 85.
Bailyn, Bernard (1967), The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (Cambridge, Massachusets: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press) 335.
Baker, Colin (1993), Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism (Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd).
Baker, Geoff (1994), ‘Stepdad gets 2 years in sex assault’, The Gazette, 15 janvier.
Bakhtin, Michael (1981), ‘The dialogic imagination: Four Essays’, in M. Holquist and C. Emerson (eds.), (Austin: University of Texas Press).
Balibar, R., , Paris (1993), Le Colinguisme (Que-Sais-Je?: PUF).
Balibar, R. (2008), ‘A propos du sionisme : messianisme et nationalisme’, l’Agenda de la pensée contemporaine, (9).
Balio, Tino (1990), Hollywood in the Age of Television (Boston: Unwin Hyman).
Balla, Monkia, Bujanovic, Sandra, and Illic, Maria (2012), ‘Hungarian in contemporary Belgrade: a case of compartmentalized language’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Ballantyne, Davidson et McIntyre ‘Ballantyne, Davidson et McIntyre c. Canada’, (31 décembre 1993 edn.).
Ballin, Luisa and Wermus, Daniel (2012), ‘«Je rêve d’un Mandela israélien»’, Le Temps, Lundi26 novembre sec. Proche-Orient
Baraby (2012), in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Barber, Benjamin R. (1993), L’Excellence et l’Egalité: de l’Education en Amérique, eds Jean Heffer and François Weil, trans. Vincent Michelot and Weil François (Cultures Américaines; Paris: Belin) 315.
Barber, Benjamin (1995), ‘Face à la Retribalisation du Monde’, Esprit, (Juin 1995), 132-44.
Barber, Benjamin R. (1996), Djihad vs McWorld, trans. Valois Michel (Paris: Desclée de Brouwer) 303.
Barber, Benjamin (2007), Consumed: How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize Adults and Swallow Citizens Whole (W.W. Norton and Company) 406.
— (2009), ‘Interdependence Day’, Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
Barber, Benjamin R. (2010), ‘America’s Knowledge Deficit’, November 10, 2010.
Barber, Benjamin (2010), ‘America’s knowledge deficit’, The Nation, Nov. 29, 2010.
— (2010), ‘Interdependence Day’, SUSTAIN/Ability (in climate, culture and civil society) (Berlin).
Barber, Benjamin, et al. (2012), ‘Welcome address, opening remarks’, paper given at 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence, Los Angeles, September 8th, 2012.
Barber, Benjamin (2012), ‘Interdependence Day’, 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence (Los Angeles).
Barghouti, Mustafa , et al. (2012), ‘One State, Two-State, Green State, Blue State’, J Street Conference Making History (Washington D.C.).
Barnavi, Elie (2011), ‘Se taire s’apparente à non-assistance à pays en danger’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 19-24.
Barnett, David and Goward, Pru (1997), John Howard, Prime Minister.
Baron, Dennis (1991), The English-Only Question: An Official Language for Americans? (Yale University Press).
Barry, Brian. (1991), ‘Self-government revisited’, Democracy and power: essays in political theory, Oxford:.
Barth, Frederik. (1969), Ethnic groups and boundaries. (Boston: Little Brown).
Baskin, Cyndy and Summer, Krystal (2011), ‘From Assimilation to transformation: Incorporating indigenous education in the main instutions of post-secondary studies’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People.
Baskin, Gershon (2012), ‘Negotiating for Gilad Shalit’s Freedom: A discussion with Gershon Baskin’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Bastarache, Michel (2012), ‘Les garanties linguistiques: droits humains ou instruments d’intégration sociale au Canada’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Batterbee, K. (2010), ‘Expectations mismatch in multiple-language polities’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Baubock, Rainer (1994), Transnational Citizenship: Membership and Rights in Transnational Migration (Aldershot: Edward Elgar).
Bauer, Alain (2003), ‘Laicité, mode d’emploi: les pouvoirs publics face à l’offensive des communautarismes’, Le Figaro, 17 novembre 2003, p. 15.
Baugh, John (1983), Black Street Speech: its history, structure and Survival (Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press).
— (1988), ‘Language and Race: Some Implications for Linguistic Science’, in F. Newmeyer (ed.), Linguistics: The Cambridge Survey (4; Cambridge: Cambridge University), 64-74.
Baugh, A. and Cable, T. (1993), A History of the English Language (4th edn.; Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall).
Baugh, John (1993), Black Street Speech (Austin, Texas: University of, Texas Press).
— (1997), ‘What’s in a name? That by Which We Call the Linguistic Consequences of the African Slave Trade’, The quarterly of the National Writing Project, (19), 9.
— (1998), ‘Linguistic, Education, and the Law: Educational Reform for African-American Language Minority Students’, in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Routledge), 282-301.
— (1999), Out of the Mouths of Slaves: African American Language and Educational Malpractice (Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press) 190.
Bearak, Barry (1997), ‘Between Black and White’, New York Times, July 27, p. sec.1, p.1.
Beaugé, Marc (2010), ‘L’English Defence League, en guerre contre l’islam’, LesInrocks.com

Beck, Ulrich (2004), ‘Cosmopolitical Realism: On the Distinction between Cosmopolitanism in Philosophy and the Social Sciences’, Global Networks, 4 (2), 109-225
— (2006), Cosmopolitan Vision (Cambridge: Polity Press).
— (2006.), Qu’est-ce que le cosmopolitisme ? (Paris: Aubier).
Becker, Gary (1957), The Economics of Discrimination (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
— (1976), The Economic Approach to Human Behavior (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
Bédarida, Catherine (2000), ‘Ahmadou Kourouma, le guerrier-griot’, Le Monde, Mercredi 1er Novembre 2000, p. 15.
Bedos, Nicolas (2012), Une Année Particulière, journal d’un mythomane, (vol.2; Paris: Robert Laffont).
Beeson, Mark (1997), ‘ Australia, APEC, and the Politics of Regional Economic Integration’, Asia Pacific Business Review, ( 2.1).

Behr, Edward (1995), Une Amérique qui fait peur: la liberté est-elle devenue l’instrument d’une nouvelle tyrannie? (Paris: Edward Behr et les Editions Plon) 325.
Beinart, Peter (2012), ‘To save Israel, boycott the settlements (OpEd)’, New York Times
Beinart, Peter (2012), ‘The Crisis of Zionism: Premiere Book Event with Author Peter Beinart’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Bell, David V.J. (1992), The roots of disunity : a study of Canadian political culture (Toronto: Oxford University Press) 200.
Bell, Pat (1999), ‘Jokes on Ebonics’.
Bellonie, Jean-David
Guérin, Emmanuelle (2011), ‘La place du français en question dans les représentations de locuteurs francophones en contact avec d’autres langues’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Ben-Ami, Jeremy (2012), ‘Welcome remarks’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Bencomo, Clarisa and Colla, Elliott (1993), ‘Area Studies, Multiculturalism, and the Problems of Expert Knowledge’, Bad Subjects Web Page, (5).
Benes, Marie-France (1999), ‘L’éducation interculturelle au service du savoir-vivre ensemble: le cas de l’école québécoise’, Revue Québécoise de Droit International: actes du Séminaire international de Montréal sur l’éducation interculturelle et multiculturelle., 12 (1), 25-32.
Benhabib, S. (2004), The Rights of Others (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Bennett, David (ed.), (1993), Cultural Studies: Pluralism & Theory (Melbourne University Literary and Cultural Studies, 2; Melbourne: Department of English, University of Melbourne).
— (ed.), (1998), Multicultural states: rethinking difference and identity (New York: Routledge).
Benrabah, Mohamed (2004), ‘Language and Politics in Algeria’, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 10 (78), 59-78.
Bensekat, Malika (2011), ‘Le français conversationnel des jeunes de Mostaganem: “une forme hybride”‘, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Bensoussan, Georges (2011), ‘Eviter l’Etat unique et arabe’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 25-36:.
— (2012), Juifs en pays arabes : lLe grand déracinement 1850- 1975 (Paris: Tallandier).
Benzenine, Belkacem (2012), ‘La langue algérienne mérite d’être valorisée’, El-Watan, 16 mars 2012, sec. Culture.
Bereiter, Carl and Engelmann, Siegfried (1966), Teaching disadvantaged children in the pre-school (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall).
Berman, Paul (ed.), (1992), Debating PC: The Controversy over Political Correctness on College Campuses (New York: Laurel).
Berman, Antoine (2008), L’Âge de la traduction. « La tâche du traducteur » de Walter Benjamin, un commentaire (
: PU Vincennes).
Bernard, Philippe (2004), ‘Interview de Didier Lapeyronnie, prof de sociologie à l’université Victor Segalen de Bordeaux’, Le Monde, mardi 6 juillet 2004, p. 6.
Bernstein, Richard (1994), ‘Guilty If Charged’, New York Times Review of Books, p. 1994.
— (1995), Dictatorship of virtue: How the battle over Multiculturalism is reshaping our Schools, our Country and our Lives (Vintage Books; New York: Random House) 379.
Berri, Y (1973), ‘Algérie: la révolution en arabe’, Jeune Afrique, (639), 14-18.
Bettoni, Camilla and Gibbons, John (1988), ‘Linguistic pluralism and language shift: a guise-voice study of the Italian community in Sydney’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (72).
Betts, Katharine (1991), ‘Australia’s Distorted Immigration Policy’, in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn, and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change (Melbourne: Scribe), 149-77.
Bezzina, Anne-Marie (2011), ‘Le contexte maltais: des contacts omni-présents’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Bhargava, R, Bagchi, Amiya K., and R., Sudarshan (eds.) (1999), Multiculturalism, liberalism and democracy (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Bharucha, Rustom ‘ Politics of culturalism in an age of globalisation: discrimination, discontent and dialogue’, Economic and Political Weekly, 8 (34), 477-89.
Bibby, R.W. (1990), Mosaic Madness: The Poverty and Potential of Life in Canada (Toronto: Stodart).
Bible ‘Chapter 8, art. 9’, The Book of Esther

Bikales, Gerda. (1986), ‘Comment: the other side’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (60), 77.
Binder, Amy (1999), ‘Friend and Foe: boundary work and collective identity in the afrocentric and multicultural curriculum movement in american public education’, in Michèle Lamont (ed.), The Cultural Territories of Race: Black and White Boundaries (University of Chicago Press), 221-48.
Bisaillon, Robert (1999), ‘Diversité et cultures: Pour une école québecoise inclusive et non discriminatoire’, Revue Québécoise de Droit International, 12 (1), 13-15.
Bissonnette, Lise (1990), ‘ Culture, politique et société au Québec’, (Centre canadien d’architecture: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation).
— (1995), ‘Préface à l’ouvrage de Bissoondath, Neil, Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme’, (Montréal: Boréal).
Bissoondath, Neil (1994), Selling Illusions: The Cult of Multiculturalism in Canada (Toronto: Penguin Books Canada).
— (1995), Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme, trans. Jean Papineau (Liber; Montréal: Boréal) 243.
Biton, Michael (2012), ‘keynote speech as the Mayor of Yerucham’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Blake, William (1757-1827), ‘Jerusalem’.
Blake, N.F. (1996), A History of the English Language (New York: New York University Press) 382.
Block, Irwin (1994), ‘Women outraged by judge’s remarks’, The Gazette, 15 janvier.
Bloom, David and Grenier, Gilles (1992), ‘Earnings of the French Minority in Canada and the Spanish Minority in the US’, in B. Chiswick (ed.), Immigration, Language and Ethnicity (Washington D.C.: The AEI Press), 379-409.
Bloomfield, Leonard (1933), Language (New York: Holt).
OAKLAND’S AFRICAN AMERICAN TASK FORCE IS ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF EDUCATIONAL REFORM (1997).
Body-Gendrot, Sophie (1991), Les Etats-Unis et leurs immigrants, ed. Isabelle Crucifix (Les études de la documentation Française, 4941; Paris: la documentation Française) 149.
Bolkestein, Fritz and Rocard, Michel (2006), Peut-on réformer la France? (Paris: Autrement).
Bonbled, Nicolas (2012), in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Bottomley, G. and M., de Lepervanche (1984), Ethnicity, Class and Gender in Australia (London: George Allen & Unwin).
Bouchard Ryan, E. and H., Giles (1982), Attitudes towards Language Variation: Social and Applied Context (Edward Arnold).
Boudon, Raymond (1998), ‘Les dangers du communautarisme ou les effets pervers de la coopération’.
Bourdieu, Pierre and Passeron, Jean-Claude (1970), La reproduction: Eléments pour une théorie du système d’enseignement (Paris: Les Editions de Minuit).
Bourdieu, P. (1981), Le Français chassé des sciences (Paris: CIREEL).
Bourmaud, Philippe (2008), ‘Une histoire de la Palestine : enjeux et périls : Recension de Gudrun Krämer, A History of Palestine. From the Ottoman conquest to the
founding of the State of Israel, Princeton / Oxford, Princeton University Press, 2008.’ la Vie des Idées.
Bouton, Charles (1984), La Neurolinguistique (Que-Sais-Je?; Paris: PUF).
— (1993), La Linguistique appliquée (3ème edn., Que-Sais-Je?, 1755; Paris: PUF) 127.
Braen, André (2012), ‘La protection juridique des langues autochtones du Canada’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Braibant, Guy (1998), ‘Le cinquantenaire de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme Personnalité juridique’, Le Monde Interactif.
Brash (1981), Black English and the Mass Media (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press).
Brass, Paul. (1974.), Language, religion and politics
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
— (1991), Ethnicity and nationalism: theory and comparison (Delhi: Sage).
Breton, Roland (1995), Géographie Des Langues (3ème edn., Coll. Que-Sais-je, #1648; Paris: PUF) 127.
Breton, Roland J.L. (1996), Atlas of the languages and ethnic communities of South Asia. (Delhi: Sage).
Brezigar, B. (2010), ‘From Maastricht to Lisbon – Development of language lesgislation in the EU Treaty’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Brohy, Claudine (1997), ‘Bilinguisme naissant ou bilinguisme évanescent? Enseignement plurilingue et interculturel en Suisse.’ Interdialogos, 2, 7-11.
Brohy, Claudine and Bregy, Anne-Lore (1998), ‘Mehrsprachige und plurikulturelle Schulmodelle in der Schweiz oder: What’s in a name?’ Bulletin suisse de linguistique appliquée., 2, 85-99.
Brohy, C. (2010), ‘Concluding remarks’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Brohy, C. & K. Herberts (2010), ‘Symposium “Language policies and language surveys in bilingual municipalities”: Bilingualism and the city: measuring the quality of linguistic cohabitation in two bilingual towns in switzerland AND Finnish bilingualism like Heinz Ketchup – at least 57 varieties!’ paper given at 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law”: Language, Law and the Multilingual State”. Bloemfontein: Free StateUniversity.
Brohy, Claudine (2012), ‘Plurilinguisme et citoyenneté: les instruments de la démocracie directe’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Brook, S. (1987), Maple Leaf Rag (Hamish Hamilton).
Brooke, James (2000), ‘Canada: Les Eglises ruinées par les Indiens?’ Courrier International (The New York Times), (523), 22.
Brooks, Roy L. (1996), Integration or Separation: A Strategy for Racial Equality (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press) 348.
Broome, R. (1994), Aboriginal Australians: Black Responses to White Dominance 1788-1994 (St Leonards NSW: Allen & Unwin).
Brown, Jennifer and Wilson, C. Roderick (1986), ‘The Northern Algonquians: a regional overview’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 143-49.
Brown, Dan (2001), Angels and Demons (paperback 2nd edn.; New York).
Brownlie, Ian (1988), ‘The Rights of Peoples In Modern International Law’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 1-16.
Bruckner, Pascal (1994), Le vertige de Babel, cosmopolitisme ou mondialisme (Paris: Arléa).
Brutt-Griffler, Janina (2003), ‘World English: A study of its development’, Journal Language Policy, 3 (October, 2003).
Bryson, Bethany (1999), ‘Multiculturalism as a moving moral boundary: literature professors redefine racism’, in Michèle Lamont (ed.), The Cultural Territories of Race: Black and White Boundaries (University of Chicago Press), 249-88.
Buchanan, Allen (1991), Secession: The Legitimacy of Political Divorce (Boulder: Westview Press).
Buckskin, Peter and O’Brien, Lewis (2011), ‘From Policy to Praxis, the time for talking is over’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE 2011), Cusco, Peru.
Bullock , A. and Stallybrass, O. (eds.) (1977), The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought (London: Fontana Books).
Bunge, Robert (1992), ‘Language: the Psyche of a People’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 376-80.
Burch, Ernest S. (1986), ‘The Eskaleuts: a regional overview’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 67-77.
Bureau, of Immigration and Population Research (1994.), Australia’s Population Trends and Propects 1993 (Canberra,: Australian Government Publishing Service).
Burnaby, B. (1982), Language in Education among Canada’s Native Peoples (Toronto: OISE Press).
— (ed.), (1985), Promoting Native Writing Systems in Canada (Toronto: OISE Press).
Burnaby, B. and Cumming, A. (eds.) (1992), Socio-political Aspects of ESL in Canada (Toronto: OISE Press).
Burnet, Jean. (1975), ‘Multiculturalism, immigration, and racism’, Canadian Ethnic Studies, 1 (7), 35-39.
Burridge, Kate, Foster, Lois, and Turcotte, Gerry (1997), Canada-Australia: Towards a Second Century of Partnership (International Council of Canadian Studies: Carleton University Press).
Bustamante, Jorge (1989), ‘Fronteras Mexico-Estados Unidos: reflexiones para un marco teorico’, Frontera Norte, 7-24.
Butler, J. (ed.), (1987.), Democratic liberalism in South Africa: its history and prospect. (Middletown Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press).
Butlin, N.G., A., Barnard, and Pincus, J.J. (1982), Government and Capitalism (Sydney: Allen and Unwin).
Bybee, Keith J. (1998), Mistaken Identity: The Supreme Court and the Politics of Minority Representation (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press) 1994.
Byrdsong, Michael D. (1994), ‘The question of the “N” word: the when, the why the who, and the what”.’ (The City College: The City University of New York term paper for course on African-American English).
Cain, Bruce. (1992.), ‘Voting rights and democratic theory: toward a colour-blind society’, in Grofman B. and Davidson C. (eds.), Controversies in minority voting: the voting rights act in perspective (Washington D.C.: Brookings Institution).
Cairns, Alan. (1991), ‘Constitutional change and the three equalities’, in Ronald Watts and Douglas Brown (eds.), Options for a new Canada. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Cairns, Alan. (1995), ‘Aboriginal Canadians, citizenship and constitution’, Reconfigurations: Canadian citizenship and constitutional change (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart).
Cajete, Gregory, Nuuhiwa, Kalei, and Laimana, Kalei (2011), ‘Ancestral knowledge of Sacred places’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE 2011), Cusco, Peru.
Calhoun, Craig (2005), ‘ Cosmopolitanism and Belonging’, in Masamichi Sasaki (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Migration and Citizenship (Stockholm, Norra Latin, Aula 3d Floor: NYU).
California ‘Regents of the State of California v. Bakke’.
Calvet, L.J. (1974), Linguistique et Colonialisme
Petit Traité de Glottophagie (Paris: Bibliothèque Scientifique Payot).
— (1981), Les Langues Véhiculaires (Paris: PUF Que-Sais-Je?).
Calvet, Louis-Jean. (1993), L’Europe et ses Langues (Paris: Plon).
Calvet, Louis-Jean (1996), Les Politiques Linguistiques (3075; Paris: PUF Que-Sais-Je?) 127.
Calvet, Louis-Jean. (2004), Essais de linguistique: la langue est-elle une invention des linguistes? (Paris: Plon) 250.
Canada (1990), Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien, Guide à l’intention des Canadiens (Ottawa).
Canada, Patrimoine (1999), ’10ème Rapport annuel sur l’application de la Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien 1997-1998′, (Ottawa: Ministère du Patrimoine canadien).
Canada, Statistique (2012), ‘Les langues immigrantes au Canada’.
Canovan, Margaret (1996), Nationhood and Political Theory (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar).
Caravedo, Rocío and Klee, Carol A. (2012), ‘Migración y contacto en Lima: el pretérito perfecto en las cláusulas narrativas’, Lengua y migración / Language and Migration, 4 (2).
Carby V., Hazel (1999), Cultures in Babylon (London and New York: Verso) 282.
Carens, Joseph ‘Citizenship and aboriginal self-government’, (Ottawa: Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples).
Carens, Joseph. (1987.), ‘Aliens and citizens: the case for open borders’, Review of Politics, 3 ( 49).
Caron, Thérèse (2012), ‘Diversité linguistique au Québec’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Carter, Philipp M. (2012), ‘Language and Identity Formation in “New” U.S. Latino Communities Phillip M. Carter
‘, in Florida International University (ed.), (Miami).
Carver, Craig (1992), ‘The Mayflower to the Model T: the development of American Eglish’, in T.W. Machan and Scott Ch.T. (eds.), English in its Social Contexts: Essays in Historical Sociolinguistics, (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 131-54.
Casey, John W. (1998), ‘The Ebonics Controversy: Critical Perspectives on African-American Vernacular English’, The Keiai Journal of International Studies, 1 (1), 179-214.
Cashmore, Ellis (1996), Dictionary of Race and Ethnic Relations (London: Routledge).
Casier, Marlies and Jongerden, Joost (eds.) (2010), Nationalisms and Politics in Turkey: Political Islam, Kemalism and the Kurdish Issue (Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics: Routledge) 236.
Cassen, Bernard (2005), ‘on peut déjà se comprendre entre locuteurs de langues romanes: Des confins au centre de la galaxie’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (Janvier 2005), 22.
— (2005), ‘on peut déjà se comprendre entre locuteurs de langues romanes: Un monde polyglotte pour échapper à la dictature de l’anglais’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (Janvier 2005), 22.
Castellanos, Diego (1992), ‘A Polyglot Nation’, Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English ControversyCrawford, James (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 13-18.
Castile, George Pierre (1998), To Show Heart (Tucson: The University of Arizona Press) 227.
Castles, Stephen (1997), ‘Multicultural citizenship: a response to the dilemna of globalisation and national identity’, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 18 (1).
Castonguay, Charles (1994), L’assimilation linguistique: mesure et évolution 1971-1986, ed. Conseil de la Langue française (Sainte-Foy, Québec: Publicatiosn du Québec) xix +243 pp.
Castro, Max J. (1992), ‘On the Curious Question of Language in Miami’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A Sourcebook on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press), 178-86.
Cernadas Carrera, Carlos (2012), ‘La migración sefardí en la Amazonia brasileña: lengua hakitía e identidad’, Lengua y migración / Language and Migration, 4 (2).
Cham, Mbye B. and Andrade-Watkins, Claire (1988), Critical Perspectives on Black Independant Cinema (Cambridge: MIT Press).
Chambers, Iain (1994.), Migrancy, Culture and Identity (London,: Routledge).
Chamot, A (1988), ‘Bilingualism in Education and Bilingual Education: the State of the Art in the United States’, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, (9), 11-35.
Chandhoke, Neera (1999), Beyond secularism: the rights of religious minorities (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Chapdelaine, J.-P. (2010), ‘La corédaction des textes législatifs comme laboratoire de la culture juridique et linguistique au Canada’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
— (2012), ‘Official Languages Act (Ireland) 2003: a review to row back rights and institutional obligations’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Chatterjee, Partha. . (1994), ‘Secularism and toleration’, Economic and Political Weekly, 28 ( 29), 1768-77.
Chaudenson, Robert and Robillard (de), Didier (1990), Langues, Economie et Développement (Aix-Marseille: Institut d’Etudes Créoles et Francophones, Université de Provence).
Chavez, Lydia (1998), The Color Bind (Berkeley: University of California Bress) 305.
Chayes, Abram and Handler Chayes, Antonia (1998), The New Souvereinty (Cambridge, Massachussetts: Harvard University Press).
Chemla, David (ed.), (2011), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ) 126.
— (2011), ‘Préface: l’âge de raison’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 11-18.
— (2011), ‘Pour que ces deux rêves deviennent mutuels: entretien avec Daniel Cohn-Bendit’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 37-48.
— (2011), ‘Pour l’amour d’Israël, Entretien avec Bernard-Henry Lévy’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 67-86.
— (2011), ‘Mon inquiétude: l’avenir d’Israël, Entretien avec Dominique Schnapper’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 97-104.
— (2011), ‘Gardons-nous de nous laisser entraîner dans le refus de l’autre, Entretien avec Michel Serfaty’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 105-16.
— (ed.), (2011), Les raisons d’un appel: JCall, appel à la raison des Juifs européens., ed. David Chemla (JCall: les raisons d’un appel, Paris: Liana Levi ) 11-18.
Chemla, David, et al. (2012), ‘Changing Paradigms Among World Jewry for a Two-State Solution’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Cherruau, Pierre (2001), ‘Luc Lagouche: Dans le club qu’il a créé à Kano, au Nigéria, il s’obstine à faire jouer ensemble musulmans et chrétiens, alors que règne la charia’, Télérama, (2662), 40-41.
Cheshire, J. (1991), English Around the World: Sociolinguistic Perspectives (Cambridge,: Cambridge University Press,).
Cheshire, Jenny (2011), ‘Adolescents as linguistic innovators: dialect contact and language contact in present-day London’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Chevallier, Anne-Claire (2000), ‘Francophones’, Télérama, (2659), 6.
Chiswick, B. (ed.), (1992), Immigration, Language and Ethnicity (Washington D.C.: The AEI Press).
Chomsky, Noam and Halle, Morris (1968), The Sound Pattern of English (New York: Harper and Row).
Chomsky, Noam (1977), Dialogue avec Mitsou Ronat (Paris: Flamarion).
— (2000), ‘Al-Aqsa Intifada’, Al-Ahram Weekly On-line, (506).
Chrétien, Jean (1997), ‘Prime Minister to Host 5th APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting in Ottawa, Ontario’, (e-mail).
— (1997), ‘APEC CEO Summit Opening Ceremony Keynote Address, Vancouver, British Columbia’, (e-mail).
Chumbow, B. S. (2010), ‘Towards a legal framework for language charters in Africa. ‘ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Churchill, S (1986), The Education of Linguistic and Cultural Minorities in OECD Countries (Philadelphia: Multilingual Matters).
Cinquin, Chantal (1989), ‘President Mitterand Also Watches Dallas: American Mass Media and French National Policy’, in Roger Rollin (ed.), The Americanization of the Global Village: Essays in Comparative popular Culture (Bowling Green: Bowling Green State University Popular Press), 12-23.
Clark, Gordon L. , Forbes, Dean, and Francis, Roderic (eds.) (1993.), Multiculturalism, Difference and Postmodernism 1 vols. (1ère edn., 1; Melbourne: Longman Cheshire) 175.
Clarke, T and Galligan, B. J. (1995), ”Aboriginal Native’ and the Institutional Construction of the Australian Citizen 1901-48.’ Australian Historical Studies, 26 (105), 523-43.
Clarkson, Adrienne (1999), ‘Exerpts from her adress on Thursday Oct.7, 1999: to be complex does not mean to be fragmented” – At her installation yesterday, Canada’s new Governor-General spoke of “the paradox and the genius of our Canadian civilization”‘, The Globe and Mail, Friday, Oct. 8, 1999, p. A11.
— (1999), ‘Governor’s General Address’, The Globe and Mail, Friday, October 8, 1999, p. A11.
Claude, Patrice (2000), ‘Et si un ou une papiste montait bientôt sur le trône d’Angleterre’, Le Monde, Mercredi 1er Novembre 2000, p. 1.
Clément, Catherine (2006), Qu’est-ce qu’un peuple premier ? (Paris: Ed. du Panama).
Cloonan, J.D. and Strine, J.M. (1991), ‘Federalism and the development of language policy: preliminary investigations’, Language Problems and Language Planning, (15.3), 268-81.
Cloud, N., Genesee, F, and Hamayan, E. (2000), Dual Language Instruction: A handbook of enriched education (Boston: Heinle & Heinle).
Clyne, M.G (1985), Multilingual Australia: Resources, Needs, Policies., 1 vols. (2ème edn., 1; Burnley, VIC: Monash University Press) 181.
Clyne, Michael, G (1992), Community Languages in Australia (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Clyne, Michael G.., in , vol. , No. , april 1997. (1997), ‘Language policy in Australia: achievements, disappointments, prospects’, Journal of Intercultural Studies, 18 (1), 63-71.
Cobarrubias, J. and J., Fishman (eds.) (1983), Progress in Language Planning, International Perspectives (Berlin: Mouton).
Cole, Michael and Bruner, Jerome S (1972), ‘Cultural differences and inferences about psychological processes’, American Psychologist, (26), 867-76.
Colombo, Jean Robert (ed.), (1991), The Dictionary of Canadian Quotations (René Lévesque) (Toronto: Stoddart).
Combes, Mary Carol (1992), ‘English Plus: Responding to English Only’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English ControversyCrawford, James (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 216-24.
Combesque, Agnès (1999), ‘Comme des papillons vers la lumière’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (Décembre 1999), 16 et 17.
Commissaire, aux Langues Officielles (1990), ‘Rapport Annuel 1989’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1991), ‘Rapport Annuel 1990’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1992), ‘Rapport Annuel 1991’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1993), ‘Rapport Annuel 1992’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1994), ‘Rapport Annuel 1993’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1995), ‘Rapport Annuel 1994’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1996), ‘Rapport Annuel 1995’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
— (1997), ‘Rapport Annuel 1996’, (Ottawa: Commissariat aux Langues Officielles).
Commission, Aboriginal Lands Rights (1973), ‘First Report’, (Canberra: Australian Parliament).
— (1974), ‘First Report’, (Canberra: Australian Parliament).
Commission (1991), ‘Human Rights and Equal Oppportunity Commission’.
Commonwealth (1984), ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984’, (Canberra: Commonwealth).
Conley, John M. and O’Barr, William (1998), Just Words: Law, Language and Power (Chicago: University of Chicago Press) 168.
Conseil, de l’Europe (1991), ‘Europe 1990-2000: Multiculture dans la Cité, l’Intégration des immigrés’, Conférence permanente des pouvoirs locaux et régionaux de l’Europe (1; Francfort-sur-le-Main: Les Editions du Conseil de l’Europe).
Conseil, de l’Europe (1992), ‘Charte européenne des langues régionales ou minoritaires’.
Conseil, de l’Europe (2001), ‘Cadre européen commun de référence pour les langues: apprendre, enseigner, évaluer’, (Didier).
Cook, Ramsay (1986), Canada, Québec and the uses of Nationalism (2ème edn.; Toronto: McClelland & Stewart).
Cooper, R.L. (1989), Language Planning and Social Change (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Coronel Molina, Serafin (2012), ‘Indigenous Languages as Cosmopolitan and Global Languages: The Latin American Case’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Correa da Costa, Sergio (1999), Mots sans Frontières (Paris: Editions du Rocher).
Corrigan, Tim (1991), A Cinema Without Walls: Movies and Culture After Vietnam (London: Routledge).
Corson, D and Lemay, S (1996), Social Justice and Language Policy in Education: The Canadian Research (Toronto: OISE Press) 149–68.
Corson, David (1997), ‘Social Justice in the Work of ESL Teachers’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), 149–68.
Cortanze (de), Gérard (2002), Assam (Paris: Albin Michel) 537.
Coulmas, Florian (1991), ‘The Language Trade in the Asian Pacific’, Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 2, 1-27.
— (1992), Language and Economy (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Courtney, John C. (1996), Do Conventions Matter? : Choosing National Party Leaders in Canada (McGill Queens University Press) 477 pages.
Craven, I. (ed.), (1994), Australian Popular Culture (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Crawford, James (ed.), (1988), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press) 236.
— (1989), Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory and Practice (Trenton, New Jersey: Crane Publishing).
— (1992), Hold your Tongue (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company) 324.
— (1992), Language Loyalties: A Sourcebook on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press) 522.
Creel, George (1947), Rebel at Large: Recollections of Fifty Crowded Years (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons) pp. 198-99.
Crépeau, François, Fournier, Stéphanie, and Néel, Lison (eds.) (1991), Séminaire International de Montréal sur l’Education Interculturelle et Multiculturelle 1 vols. (Numéro Spécial, 12; Montréal: Société Québécoise de Droit International) 273.
Crépon, Marc (2000), Le Malin Génie des langues (Paris: J. Vrin) 224.
Crowley, Terry (1998), An Introduction to Historical Linguistics (3d edn.; Oxford: Oxford University Press) 342.
Crystal, David (1995), The Cambridge Encyclopedia of English Language (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) 489.
— (1997), English as a Global Language (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) 150.
Cubertafond, Bernard (1995), L’Algérie contemporaine (Que SaisJe?; Paris: PUF).
Culhane, J.G. (1992), ‘Reinvigorating Educational Malpractice Claims: A Representational Focus”‘, Washington Law Review, 2 (67), 349-414.
Cumming, Alister (1997), ‘English Language-in-Education Policies in Canada’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), 91-105.
Cummins, J. (ed.), (1984), Heritage languages in Canada: Research Perspectives (Toronto: OISE Press).
— (1989), ‘Heritage language teaching and the ESL student: fact and friction’, in J. Esling (ed.), Multicultural Education and Policies: ESL in the 1990s (Toronto: OISE Press), 3.17.
Cunningham, S. (1992), Framing Culture: Criticism and Policy in Australia (Sydney: Allen & Unwin).
CURANT, NIKOLAS ‘addition to Sociolinguists on FB Award’.
Cusin, Philippe (1999), ‘Abd el-Krim, le Mythe du Rebelle’, Le Figaro Littéraire, 12 aout, p. 3 (17).
Dafoe, J.W. (1935), Canada: An American Nation (New York: Columbia University Press).
Dakhli, Leyla (2009), ‘Le multilinguisme est un humanisme’, La Vie des Idées, <http://www.laviedesidees.fr/Le-multilinguisme-est-un-humanisme.html&gt;, accessed 4.11.2009.
Dakhlia, Jocelyne (2008. ), Lingua Franca. Histoire d’une langue partagée en Méditerranée (Actes Sud).
Dalby, David (1969), ‘Patterns of Communication in Africa and the New World’, (Hans Wolff Memorial Lecture).
Daniel, Dominique (1996), L’immigration aux Etats-Unis (1965-1995): Le poids de la réunification familiale (Le Monde Nord-Américain; Paris et Montréal: L’Harmattan (Inc,)) 236.
Daniel, Jean- (2009), ‘Camus, le sacre’, Le Nouvel Obs, 1.
Daniels, H.A. (ed.), (1990), Not Only English: Affirming America’s Multilingual Heritage (Urbana, Ilinois: National Council of Teachers of English).
Danley, John (1991), ‘ Liberalism, aboriginal rights and cultural minorities’, ‘Philosophy and Public Affairs, 2 (20), 168-85.
Daoud, Zakya (1999), Abdelkirm, une épopée d’or et de sang (Paris: Séguier).
Das Gupta, Jyotirindra (1970), Language conflict and national development: group politics and national policy (Bombay: Oxford University Press).
Dasgupta, Probal (2012), ‘La politique linguistique et les langues indiennes moins répandues’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 127-44.
Dawkins, J.S. (1988), ‘Challenges and Opportunities: our future in Asia’, in E.M. McKay, Asian Studies Association of Australia (ed.), Challenges and Opportunities: our future in Asia (Melbourne: Morphett Press), 13-21.
de Certeau, Michel, Julia, Dominique, and Revel, Jacques (2002), Une Politique de la langue: la révolution française et les patois: l’enquête de l’Abbé Grégoire (Paris: Editions Gallimard) 472.
de Cortanze, Gérard (1998), Les Vice-Rois (Arles: Actes Sud) 669.
de Swaan, Abram (2001), Words of the World (Cambridge: Polity Press,).
— (2005), ‘Utiliser l’instrument de l’anglais sans se noyer dans sa culture.’ Le Temps, 13 septembre 2005.
De Varennes, Fernand (1996), Language, Minorities and Human Rights (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers).
— (1999), ‘Les droits de l’homme et la protection des minorités linguistiques’, in Hervé Guillorel and Geneviève Kouby (eds.), Langues et Droit: Langues du droit, droit des langues (Bruxelles: Bruylant), 129-41.
— (2010), ‘Closing Keynote.’ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
— (2010), ‘One people, One language? The response of International law to the multilingual state. ‘ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
— (2012), ‘Langues officielles versus droit linguistiques: L’un exclut-il l’autre?’ Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 33-50.
De Vries, John (1985), ‘Some methodological aspects of self report questions on language and ethnicity’, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 6, 347-68.
Debray, Régis (2000), ‘Sus aux Clochers! La nation n’a plus besoin de hussards: Ce n’est pas une raison pour la réduire à une France du chacun pour soi, où les racines prennent le pas sur les valeurs.’ L’Express, (2558), 58-59.
Decraene, Philippe (1981), ‘Interview d’Amadou Hampate Ba’, in Jacques Meunier (ed.), Entretiens avec Le Monde (4; Paris: Editions La Découverte/ Le Monde), 169-83.
DEET (1991), ‘Australia’s Language: The Australian Language and Literacy Policy’, (Canberra: Department of Employment, Education and Training).
Déguinet, Jean-Marie (1999), Mémoires d’un Paysan Bas-Breton, trans. Bernez Roux (14 edn.; Ar Releg-Kerhuon: An Here).
Delafenêtre, David G. (1997), ‘Interculturalism, Multiracialism and Transculturalism: Australian and Canadian Experiences with Multiculturalism and Its Alternatives in the 1990s’, Nationalism & Ethnic Politics, ( 3.1).
Delbecq, Denis (1998), ‘UNL, un nouvel Esperanto pour le Web’, Le Monde Interactif, (Samedi 5 Décembre 1998).
Dempsey, Hugh (1986), ‘The Blackfoot Indians’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 381-413.
Denutte, Alexandre (1994), ‘L’enseignement immersif au Canada et ses applications’, Dir. M.P. Gautier (Paris 4 Sorbonne).
Dervez, Luis (2012), ‘Keynote Address’, in Interdependence Day (ed.), (Los Angeles: Benjamin Barber).
Descola, Philippe (1996), ‘Commentaires sur l’écriture de l’ouvrage Les lances du Crépuscule.’ (Troisième cycle Romand de Sociologie).
Détienne, Marcel (2000), Comparer l’incomparable (« Libairie du XXIe siècle »; Seuil ).
Deumert, Ana and Klein, Yolandi (2012), ‘Marginal Diversities and Digital Conormities: the strudture of Multilingua performances’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Deutsch, Martin (1967), The disadvantaged child (New York: Basic Books).
Devonish, Hubert (2012), ‘Stop Demonising Patois -From A Semi-Lingual To A Bilingual Jamaica’, The Gleaner, 26 Aug.
Dewey, J.L. (1938), Experience and Education (New York: Ramdom House).
Diawara, Manthia (ed.), (1993), Black American Cinema (New York: Routledge).
Dieckhoff, Alain (2000), La nation dans tous ses Etats: les identités nationales en mouvement (Paris: Flammarion).
Dillard, J.L. (1972), Black English: its History and Usage in the United States (New York: Random House).
— (1972), A History of American English (New York: Longman).
Dion, Stéphane (1991), ‘Le Nationalisme dans la Convergence Culturelle’, in R. Hudon and R. Pelletier (eds.), L’Engagement Intellectuel (Sainte-Foy: Les Presses de l’Université Laval,).
— (1994), ‘ Le fédéralisme fortement asymétrique: improbable et indésirable’, in F.L. Seidle (ed.), A la Recherche d’un nouveau Contrat politique pour le Canada: Options asymétriques et options confédérales (Québec: Institute for Research on Public Policy), 133-52.
Djérad, Najoua (2012), ‘Conflits linguistiques dans les pays linguistiques au Maghreb’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Djité, Paulin (1994), ‘From Language Policy to Language Planning: An Overview of Languages other than English in Australian Education.’ (The National Language and Literacy Institute of Australia).
Doecke, B (1993), Kookaburras, blue gums, and ideological state apparatuses: English in Australia.
Donnelly, J. (2003), Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice (New York: Cornell University Press).
Doucet, Michel (2012), ‘Etat linguistique’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Douzinas, C. (2000), The End of Human Rights (Oxford: Hart).
Draper, Jamie B (1991), ‘Dreams, Realities, and Nightmares: The present and Future of Foreign Language Education in the United States’, (Washington: Joint National Committee for Languages in cooperation with the National Council of State Supervisors of Foreign Languages).
Draper, Jamie B and Martha, Jiménez (1992), ‘A chronology of the Official English Movement’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 89-94.
Draper, John (2009), ‘ Moves towards meeting international treaty obligations regarding multilingual education in Thailand’, paper given at International Conference on Educational Research, Khon Kaen, Thailand, 11 September.
— (2012), ‘Reconsidering compulsory English in developing countries in Asia: English in a Community of Northeast Thailand’, TESOL Quarterly, 46 (4), 777-811.
— (2012), ‘Revisiting English in Thailand’, Asian EFL Journal., 14 (4), 9-38.
Druke Becker, Martine (1986), ‘Iroquois and Iroquoian in Canda’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 323-46.
Du Plessis, Theodorous (2010), A language Act for South Africa? The role of sociolinguistic principles in the analysis of the language legislation.
Dua, Hans Raj (1996), ‘The Politics of Language Conflict: Implications for Language Planning and Political Theory’, Language Problems and Language Planning, 1-17.
DuBois, W and E.Burghardt (1896), The Suppression of African Slave Trade in the United States of America 1638-1870.
DuBois, W.E.Burghardt (1961), (1903) The Souls of Black Folk (Greenwich, CT: Fawcett Publications Inc.).
Ducrot, Osward and Todorov, Tzvetan (1972), Dictionnaire encyclopédique des sciences du langage (Points Essais, 110; Paris: Editions du Seuil) 470.
Dufour, Christian (1989), Le Défi Québécois (Montreal: L’Hexagone).
Dumont, Fernand (1997), Raisons communes (Compact; Beauceville: Boréal) 261.
Durand, Jorge (1996), Migrations mexicaines aux Etats-Unis (Paris: CNRS Editions) 214.
Duranti, Alessandro (1994), From Grammar to Politics: Linguistic Anthropology in a Western Samoan Village (Berkeley: University of California Press).
Duverger, Maurice (1973), Sociologie de la Politique (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France).
Dworkin, Ronald (1983), ‘ In defense of equality’, Social Philosophy and Policy, 1 ( 1), 24-40.
Dworkin, R. (2005), Taking Rights Seriously (London: Duckworth).
Earlie, James (2012), ‘Transnational lives’, Interdependence Day 2012 (Los Angeles: Benjamin Barber).
Eastman, Carol (1993), Language Planning: an Introduction (San Francisco: Chandler & Sharp).
Eckermann, Ann-Katrin (1994), One Classroom, Many Cultures: Teaching Strategies for Culturally Different Children (St Leonards, Nouvelle Galles du Sud, Australie: Allen & Unwin).
Eckert, Penelope ‘suites de sa biblio’.
Eckert, Penelope (2008), ‘theory of social style and the indexical field.
‘ Journal of Sociolinguistics/, 2008: , 12 (4), 453-76.
Eco, Umberto ( 1994), La Recherche de la langue Parfaite, (Paris: Editions du Seuil).
Edwards, John (1984), Linguistic Minorities, Policies and Pluralism (London: Harcourt Brace).
Edwards, J., Language (1985), Language, Society and Identity (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Edwards, J. (1994), Multilingualism (1 edn.; London: Routledge) 256.
Eftiemi, Alexandra
Macovei, Oana (2012), ‘Protection des locuteurs et protection des langues minoritaires ou régionales en Roumanie’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 145-70.
Eggington, William and Wren, Helen (eds.) (1997), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company) 170.
Eggington, William (1997), ‘The English Language Metaphors We Plan By.’ in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), 29-46.
Eisenberg, Avigail (1994), ‘The Politics of Individual and Group Difference in Canadian Jurisprudence’, Canadian Journal of Political Science, (27), 3-21.
Eisner, Jane (2012), ‘keynote’, J Street, Making History (Washington DC).
El Mountassir, Abdallah (2012), ‘Droits linguistiques et inclusion sociale des communautés amazighes: exemple de la communauté amazighe du Maroc’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Elliot, Michael (1998), ‘A letter to the French: we don’t think that France is a nightmare; we just think it should be more like Holland’, Newsweek, CXXXI (25), 2.
Elliott, Jean Leonard (1985), Two Nations, Many Cultures: Ethnic Goups in Canada (Carborough, Ont.: Prentice Hall).
Ellis, Rod (1999), Second Language Acquisition (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
El-Mekkaoui, Fatima (1997), ‘Problèmes d’Immigration aux Etats-Unis d’Amérique entre 1900 et 1926’, (Sorbonne).
Eloy, J.-M. (2010), ‘Aménagement, politique, droits linguistiques: de la pertinence de ces notions dans le cas de la France’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Epp, Charles R. (1998), The Rights Revolution: Lawyers, Activists and Supreme Courts in Comparative Perspectives (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press) 326.
European Centre on Migration and interethnic relations.
Esling, J. (ed.), (1989), Multicultural Education and Policies: ESL in the 1990s (Toronto: OISE Press).
Espéranto, Association Mondiale de l’ (2003), ‘L’égalité des langues: une nécessité pour l’Europe’, Le Monde, 14 juin, p. 5.
Estrada, Marcos (2012), ‘Universal Vision and Philosophical Framework’, in Surendra Pathak (ed.), Teacher Education for Peace and Harmony (New Delhi and Shardarsahar).
Eugenides, Jeffrey (2003), Middlesex (2nd edn.; London: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc) 529.
Ewers, Traute (1996), The Origin of American Black English: Be-Forms in the HOODOO Texts (Berlin and New York: Mouton).
Fairclough, N. (1985), Language and Power (New York: Longman Publishing).
Falcoff, Mark (1996), ‘article’, Times Literary Supplement.
Falk, Richard (1988), ‘The Rights of Peoples (In Particular Indigenous People)’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 17-37.
Farhat, Mokhtar (2011), ‘L’interlangue et les interférences linguistiques: anaylyse d’un corpus de production écrite dans les classes de français en Tunisie’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Faries, E (1989), ‘Language Education for Native Children in Northern Ontario’, in J. Esling (ed.), Multicultural Education and Policies: ESL in the 1990s (Toronto: OISE Press), 144-53.
Farrar, Arihia (2011), ‘He Taonga te repo (title of her poem too)’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE 2011), Cusco, Peru.
Fase, Willem, Koen, Jaspaert , and Kroon, Sjaak (eds.) (1992), Maintenance and Loss of Minority Languages (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company).
Fasold, Ralph (1969), ‘Tense and the form be in Black English’, Language, (45), 763-76.
— (1972), ‘Tense marking in Black English’, (Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics).
— (1984), The Sociolinguistics of Society (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Feher, Michel (1995), ‘Identités en évolution: individu, famille, communauté aux Etats-Unis’, Esprit, (Juin 1995), 114-31.
Feliciano, Hector and Sulic, Dijana (1997), ‘Le monde se divise désormais selon les appartenances de civilisations.’ Le Nouveau Quotidien, 28 février, p. 16.
Fellows, Donald Keith (1972), A Mosaic of America’s Ethnic Minorities (New York: Wiley).
Fenet, Alain, Koubi, Geneviève, and Schulte-Tenckhoff, Isabelle (2000), Le Droit et les Minorités (2ème edn., Orgaisation internationale et relations internationales; Bruxelles: Bruylant) 661.
Ferenczi, Aurélien (2000), ‘Un Indien chez les Cow-boys’, Télérama, (2659), 20.
Ferguson, Charles .A and Brice, Heath Shriley (eds.) (1981), Language in the USA (3 edn., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) 592.
Ferguson, Charles A. (1981), ‘Foreword’, in Braj B. Kachru (ed.), Pergamon Institute of English (Oxford: Pergamon Press), vii-xi.
Fesl, Eve (1991), ‘A Koorie View’, in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn, and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change (Melbourne: Scribe), 56-60.
Fetzer, Philip L. (ed.), (1998), The Ethnic Moment: the search for equality in the American Experience (Armonk, N.Y., London, U.K.: M.E. Sharpe) 269.
Emission Répliques du 24 février 2007: L’héritage de Pierre Mendès France (2007) (émission radiophonique, France Culture).
Emission Répliques du 29 Septembre 2012: Faut-il déconstruire Israel (2007) (émission radiophonique, France Culture).
Finkielkraut, Alain (2011), ‘Les yeux ouverts’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 49-53.
Emission Répliques du octobre 2012: La création du Monde (2012) (émission radiophonique, France Culture).
Finney, Angus (1996), The State of European Cinema: A New Dose of Reality (London: Cassell).
Fishman, Joshua A. and Nahirny, Vladimir C. (1966), ‘Organization and leadership in language maintenance’, in Fishman (ed.), Language Loyalty in the United States, 156-89.
Fishman, Joshua A. (1967), ‘Bilingualism with and without diglossia: Diglossia with and without Bilingualism’, Journal of Social Issues, (23), 29-38.
— (ed.), (1968), Readings in the sociology of language (The Hague: Mouton).
Fishman, Joshua A. and Dillard, JL. (1975), Perspectives on Black English (The Hague: Mouton).
Fishman, Joshua A. , et al. (1985), The Rise and Fall of Ethnic Revival (Contributions to the Sociology of Language, 37; Berlin, New York et Amsterdam: Mouton) 531.
Fishman, Joshua A. (1992), ‘The Displaced Anxieties of Anglo-Americans’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 165-67.
— (2012), ‘Etats du Yiddish: les différents types de reconnaissance gouvernementale ou non gouvernementale (Varieties of Governement and Non-Governement recognition of Yiddish’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 23-32.
Fitzgerald, Frances (1980), America Revised (New York: Vintage Books).
FitzGerald, Stephen (1997), Is Australia an Asian Country ? (St Leonards: Allen & Unwin).
Flaysakier, Jean-Daniel (2002), ‘Télescopage’, Libération, 22 avril 2002, p. 17.
Fleras, Augie and Elliott, Jean Leonard (1992), The Nation within: Aboriginal State Relations in Canada, the United States and New Zealand (Toronto: Oxford University Press).
Foucher, P. (2010), ‘les droits linguistiques et la jurisprudence canadienne. ‘ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Foucher, Pierre (2012), ‘Official Languages Act (Ireland) 2003: a review to row back rights and institutional obligations’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Franklin, Benjamin (1961), ‘Observations concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries Etc.’ in Leonard W. Labaree (ed.), Papers (4; New Haven: Yale University Press).
Fraser, Graham and McIlroy, Anne (1999), ‘Clinton buoys federal cause’, Globe and Mail, October 9, 1999, p. A1.
Fraser, N. (2001), ‘‘Recognition Without Ethics’, Theory Culture and Society, (18), 21-42.
Fredrik, Barth (1995), ‘Les Groupes ethniques et leurs frontières’, in Philippe Poutignat and Jocelyne Streiff-Fenart (eds.), Théories de l’Ethnicité (1ère edn., 1; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France), 270.
Frideres, James (1997), ‘Edging into the Mainstream: Immigrant Adult and their Children’, in S. Isajiw (ed.), Comparative Perspectives on Interethnic Relations and Social Incorporation in Europe and North America (Toronto: Canadian Scholar’s Press), 537-62.
Friedman, Thomas L. (2012), ‘Power with Purpose’, Herald Tribune, 24 May 2012.
Fyfe, Christopher (ed.), (1991), Our Children Free and Happy”: Letters from Black Settlers in Africa in the 1790s. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press).
Gabizon, Cécilia (2001), ‘A TOULOUSE, LES FILS DU VENT SE SEDENTARISENT’, Le Figaro, 10 septembre 2001, p. 12.
Gabler, Neal (1988), An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood (New York: Crown).
Gadet, Françoise and Ludwigh, Ralph (2011), ‘synthèse finale et clôture du colloque.’ paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Gagnon, Paul (1989), Democracy’s untold Story: What American History Textbooks should Add. (Washington, D.C.: American Federation of Teachers).
Galenkamp, Marlies (1993), Individualism and collectivism: the concept of collective rights (Rotterdam: Rotterdamse Filosofische Studies).
Galindo-Anze, Eudoro (1999), ‘Immigration Centennial Ehances Close Relations’, The Japan Times, Aug.6, p. 5.
Gamston, William A. (2012), ‘Arab Spring, Israeli Summer, and the Process of Cognitive Liberatoin’, Swiss Political Science Review : , 17 (4), 463-68.
Blacklash?Black facts Web Page (1996) (Web page).
Gauld, Greg (1992), ‘Multiculturalism, the real thing?’ in Stella Hryniuk (ed.), Twenty Years of Multiculturalism: Successes and Failures (Winnipeg: St John’s College Press), 9-16.
Gautier, Maurice-Paul (ed.), (1992), Hommage à Maurice-Paul Gautier, Regards Européens sur le Monde Anglo-Américain (Paris: Presses de l’Université de Paris-Sorbonne,).
— (1995), ‘Langues vivantes et temps présent’, Comprendre les langues aujourd’hui. (Dijon: Tribune Internationale des Langues Vivantes).
Gellner (1983), Nations and Nationalism (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Gerard, Jean B. (1984), ‘Pourquoi les Etats-Unis ont du quitté l’UNESCO’, Revue des deux Mondes, (Juin).
Germon, Marie-Laure (2004), ‘l’identité par la langue’, Le Figaro.
Gibbs, Jonathan W. (1994), ‘The use of words: How so-called foul words can have many meanings’, (The City College: The City University of New York term paper for course on African-American English).
Giesbert, Franz-Olivier (2012), ‘La fin d’une époque’, Le Point, 20 septembre 2012, sec. Editorial p. 7.
Giglioli, P.P. (1972), Language and Social Context (London: Penguin Books).
Gillespie, M. (1995), Television, Ethnicity and Cultural Change (London: Routledge).
Giordan, Henri (1992), ‘Les Langues Minoritaires, Patrimoine de l’Humanité’, in Hervé Guillorel and Jean Sibille (eds.), Langues, dialectes et écriture (Paris: Institut d’Etudes Occitanes et Institut de Politique Internationale et Européenne), 173-85.
Gitlin, Todd (1992), ‘On the Virtues of Loose Canon’, in Paul Berman (ed.), Debating PC: The Controversy over Political Correctness on College Campuses (New York: Laurel).
Glazer, Nathan and Moynihan, Daniel P. (1963), Beyond the Melting Pot: The Negroes, Puerto Ricans, Jews, Italians and Irish of New York City (Cambridge: MIT Press).
Glazer, Nathan (1975 (1987)), Affirmative Discrimination (Cambridge: Harvard University Press).
— (1995), ‘Individual Rights against Group Rights’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
— (1997), We are all Multiculturalists Now (Cambridge: Harvard University Press).
Godbout, Jacques (1989), ‘(à propos de Montréal)’, Globe and Mail.
Godreche, Dominique (1999), ‘FESTIVAL DE DOUARNENEZ : Le Yiddishland au cinéma’, LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE, (AOÛT), 19.
Gohard, Aline (1997), ‘D’une multiculturalité reconnue vers un plurilinguisme construit’, in Peter Lang (ed.), Multilinguisme et Multiculturalité (Fribourg: Peter Lang).
— (1997), ‘Publics spécifiques: quels enjeux ? quelles démarches? pour quels nouveaux besoins’, Revue de Linguistique et de Didactique des langues (LIDIL), 16 (dec.1997).
— (1998), ‘Peut-on former à l’interculturel? quels concepts et quelles démarches’, Bulletin de l’Association pour la recherche interculturelle (ARIC), (30).
— (1999), Communiquer en langue étrangère. Des compétences culturelles vers des compétences linguistiques. (Bern: Peter Lang).
Gold, Robert (1960), A Jazz Lexicon (New York: Knopf).
Gold, David (1987), ‘The speech and writing of Jews’, in Charles A. Ferguson and Shirley Brice Heath (eds.), Language in the USA (1; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 273-92.
Goldberg, D.T. (ed.), (1994), Multiculturalism: a critical reader (Oxford: Blackwell).
Goodman, D., O’Hearn, D.J., and Wallace-Crabbe, C. (eds.) (1991), Multicultural Australia (Melbourne: Scribe).
Gordon, Milton (1964), Assimilation in American life: the role of race, religion and national origin (New York: Oxford University Pres).
Görlach, Manfred (1997), ‘Language and Nation: the concept of linguistic identity in the history of English’, English World-Wide, (18), 1-34.
Gorter, Durk , Marten, Heiko F., and Van Mense, Luk (eds.) (2012), Minority Languages in the Linguistic Landscape
Edited by (Palgrave Studies in Minority Languages and Communities, London: Palgrave Macmillan).
Goudsblom, J. (1980), Nihilism and Culture (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Gour (Gur), Batya (1994), Meurtre à l’Université: un crime littéraire, trans. Jacqueline Carnaud et Jacqueline Lahana (Paris: Arthème Fayard) 350.
— (1995), Meurtre au Kibboutz trans. Rosie Pinhas-Delpuech (Paris: Arthème Fayard) 435.
Gouvernement, Fédéral Canadien (1867), ‘Constitution Act’.
— (1982), ‘Charte Canadienne des Droits et Libertés’.
— (1987), ‘Accord constitutionnel’.
— (1991), ‘Shaping Canada’s Future Together (Proposals )’, (Ottawa: Supply and Services).
— (1991), ‘Shared Values: The Canadian Identity’, (Ottawa: Supply and Services).
— (1992), ‘LES ACCORDS DE CHARLOTTEVILLE: Consensus Report On The Constitution Charlottetown’.
Gozlan, Martine (2012), ‘Israël: Le complot des faucons pour contrôler le pays’, Marianne.
Green, Leslie. (1994), ‘‘International minorities and their rights Group rights’, in Judith Baker (ed.), (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Green, Leslie (1995), ‘Internal Minorities and their Rights’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
Grin, François (1994), ‘Combining Immigrant and Autochthonous language rights’, in Tove Skuttnab-Kangas and Robert Phillipson (eds.), Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination (1; Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter), 39:70.
— (1996), ‘Economic approaches to language and language planning: an introduction’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 121 (1996).
Grin, François and Vaillancourt, François (1999), ‘The cost-effectiveness evaluation of minority language policies’, (Flensbourg: European Centre for Minority Issues).
Grin, François (2001), ‘Kalmykia, victim of Stalinist genocide: from oblivion to reassertion’, Journal of Genocide Research, 3 (1), 97-116.
Grin, François and Vaillancourt, François (2002), ‘Minority Self-Governance in Economic Perspective’, in Kinga Gal (ed.), Minority Governance in Europe (Flensbourg: European Centre for Minority Issues).
Grin, François and Schwob, Irene (2002), ‘Bilingual Education and Linguistic Governance: the Swiss experience’, Intercultural Educaton, 13 (4), 409-26.
Grin, François, Rossiaud, Jean, and Kaya, Bülent (2003), ‘Les Migrations et la Suisses’, in Hans-Rudolf Wicker, Rosita Fibbi, and Werner Haug (eds.), Résultat du programme national Suisse de recherche Migrations et Relations Interculturelles (Bern: Editions Seismo et FNRS), 404-33.
Grin, François (2003), ‘Diversity as Paradigm, Analytical Device, and Policy Goal’, in Will Kymlicka and Anthony Patten (eds.), Language Rights and Political Theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 169-88.
— (2003), ‘La Suisse comme non-multination’, in Michel Seymour (ed.), Etats-nations, multinations et organisations supranationales (Paris: Liber), 265-81.
— (2007), ‘Pourquoi donc apprendre l’anglais? Le point de vue des élèves’, in Daphné Romy-Masliah and Larissa Aronin (eds.), L’Anglais et les Cultures: carrefour ou frontière? (Paris: L’Harmattan), 75-95.
Grosjean, F. (1982), Life with Two Languages: An Introduction to Bilingualism (Cambridge, Massachussets: Harvard University Press).
Grossman, David (2011), ‘Ce que je connais de la guerre me donne le droit de parler de la paix’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 55-66.
Gruenais, M.-P. (ed.), (1986), Etats de Langue (Paris: Fondation Diderot/Fondation Arthème Fayard).
Guerrero, Ed (1993), Framing Blackness (Philadelphia: Temple University Press).
Guest, Edwin (1838), History of English Rhythms.
Guillaume, P., et al. (1986), Minorités et Etat (Québec et Bordeaux: Presses de l’Université Laval et Presses Universitaires de Bordeaux).
Guillorel, Hervé (1992), ‘De l’utilisation politique de la variété dialectale’, in Hervé Guillorel and Jean Sibille (eds.), Langues, dialectes et écriture (Paris: Institut d’Etudes Occitanes et Institut de Politique Internationale et Européenne), 122-34.
Guillorel, Hervé and Koubi, Geneviève (1999), Langues du droit, droit des langues (Langues et Droit; Bruxelles: Bruylant).
Gumperz, John and Hymes, Dell (1964), ‘The ethnography of Communication’, American Anthropologist, Special Publication (66), No. 6, part 2: 137-53.
Gumperz, John (1971), Language in Social Groups (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press).
Gunew, Sneja (1993), ‘Multicultural Multiplicities: US, Canada, Australia’, in David Bennett (ed.), Cultural Studies: Pluralism & Theory (2; Melbourne: Department of English, University of Melbourne), 51-65.
Gunning, Tom (1991), D.W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film: The Early Years at Biograph (Urbana: University of Illinois Press).
Gupta, Anju (1995), ‘Medium of instruction in a multilingual context’, in R.K. Agnihotri and A.L. Khanna (eds.), English language teaching in India: issues and innovations (Delhi: Sage).
Gupta, Dipankar (1996), The context of ethnicity (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Gur(Gour), Batya (1992), The Saturday Morning Murder: A psychoanalytical Case, trans. Dalya Bilu (New York: HarperCollins) 292.
Gurr, Ted (1993), Minorities at risk: a global view of ethno-political conflict. (Washington D.C.: Institute of Peace Press).
Gutmann, Amy (ed.), (1992), Multiculturalism and the politics of recognition (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
— (1993), ‘Challenges to multiculturalism and political ethics’, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 3 (22), 171-206.
Guy, Gregory (1988), ‘Coping with Diversity: Australia and the Soviet Union’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 452-59.
Guy, Gregory R. . (1989), ‘ International Perspectives on Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights’, Language Problems and Language Planning, (Spri ng), 45.
Guy, Gregory R., et al. (eds.) (1997), Towards a Social Science of Language: Papers in honor of William Labov. : Social interaction and discourse structures. 2 vols. (Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 127-128).
Gwyn, Richard (1980), The Northern Magus (Toronto: McClelland and Stewart).
Gyldén, Axel (2000), ‘Brésil: Un géant du XXIème siècle’, Le Point Edition Affaires avec Business Week, (1440), 74-79.
Habel, Jeannette (1999), ‘ZONES FRANCHES ET RIDEAU DE FER : Entre le Mexique et les Etats-Unis, plus qu’une frontière’, Le Monde Diplomatique, 16 et 17.
Habermas, Jurgen (1998), Inclusion of the Other (Cambridge: Polity Press).
— (2001), The Post-national Constellation (Cambridge: Polity Press).
Haeri, Niloofar (2002), ‘Book Review of Owens, J., Ed. (2000). Contributions to the Sociology of Language.’ Anthropological linguistics, 299-302.
— (2003), Sacred Language, Ordinary People: Dilemmas of Culture and Politics in Egypt (New York: Palgrave).
Hagège, Claude (1987), Le Français et les Siècles (Paris: Editions Odile Jacob).
— (1992), Le Souffle de la Langue: Voies et destins des Parlers d’Europe (Paris: Editions Odile Jacob).
— (1996), L’Enfant aux deux Langues (Paris: Editions Odile Jacob).
Hakem, Tewfik (2000), ‘Henri Dikongué, n’oublie jamais’, Télérama, (2649), 92.
Hall, Edward, T (1979), Au-delà de la Culture (Editions du Seuil).
Hall, Stuart, et al. (eds.) (1990), Culture, Media, Language (6ème edn.: Unwin Hyman in association with the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, University of Birmigham) 311.
Halliday, M.A.L., Gibbons J., Nicholas H. (1987), ‘Learning, Keeping and Using Language, Selected Papers’, 8th World Congress of Applied Linguistics (Sydney).
Hannerz, Ulf (2005), ‘Geocultural scenarios’, in Neil J. Smelser, University of California, Berkeley (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Sociology and Cultural Sciences (Folket Hus, Kongresshallen Q: Stockholm University).
Hannum, Hurst (1989), ‘The limits of sovereignty and majority rule: minorities, indigenous peoples, and right to autonomy’, in Ellen Lutz, Hannum Hurst, and Kathryn Burke (eds.), New directions in human rights. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania,).
Hardin, Russel (1995), One for all: the logic of group conflict (Princeton: Princeton University Press) 270+index.
Hardjono, Ratih (1993), White Tribe of Asia: an Indonesian View of Australia (Clayton VIC: Monash University & Hyland House).
Hardt, Michael and Dumm, Thomas (2000), Sovereignty, Multitudes, Absolute Democracy: A discussion between Michael Hardt and Thomas Dumm about Hardt and Negri’s Empire (Cambridge: Harvard University Press).
Harel-Shalev, Ayelet (2009), ‘Lingual and Educational Policy toward “Homeland Minorities” in Deeply Divided Societies: India and Israel as Case Studies’, Politics & Policy,, 37 (5 ), 951-70.
Harles, John (1994), Politics in the Lifeboat: Immigrants and the American Democratic Order (Boulder: Westview Press).
Harms, L. T. (2010), ‘Opening Address.’ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Harrison, B and Marmen, L (1994), ‘Les Langues au Canada’, (Ottawa: Statistique Canada).
Hartman, Donniel (2012), ‘Plenary Session: The Future of Pro-Israel’.
Hartney, Michael (1995), ‘Some Confusions Concerning Collective Rights’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
Hartz, Louis (1955), The Liberal Tradition in America (New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company) 329.
— (ed.), (1964), The Founding of New Societies (San Diego-New York-London: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich) 336.
Hasan (1994), L’Algérie et son destin. Croyants ou citoyens (Alger: Médias Associés).
Haugen, Einar (1953), The Norwegian language in America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press).
— (1972), The Ecology of Language: Essays by Einar Haugen (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press).
Hayakawa, S.I. (1985), ‘One Nation…Indivisible? The English Language Amendment’, (Washington D.C.: Washington Institute for Values in Public Policy).
Hayday, Matthew.
Hayden, Tom, et al. (2012), ‘Interdependence, Culture and Social Justice’, paper given at 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence Panel, Los Angeles, September 8th, 2012.
Hayward, Victoria and Watson, Edith S. (1922), Romantic Canada (Toronto).
Head, Brian W. (1983), State and Economy in Australia (Melbourne: Oxford University Press).
Heine, Bernd (2011), ‘Accounting for some structual characteristics of French-Based creoles.Internal vs external motivations’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Heller-Roazen, Daniel and Haeri, Niloofar (2007.), Echolalies. Essai sur l’oubli des langues (« Librairie du XXIe siècle »: Seuil ).
Henderson, Willie, Dudley-Evans, Tony, and Backhouse, Roger (eds.) (1993), Economics and Language (London: Routledge).
Henning, J. (2010). (2010), ‘Keynote Address: the Company’s act’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Henry, F , et al. (1995), The Colour of Democracy, Racism in Canadian Society (Toronto: Harcourt Brace).
Héraud, Guy ( 1993), L’Europe des Ethnies (Paris: Librairie Générale de Droit et de Jurisprudence).
Heritage, Statistics Canada and Canadian (1999), ‘Les langues au Canada: Recensement de 1996’, (, published in New Canadian
Perspectives Series, aimed at providing a general portrait of the linguistic
situation in Canada.).
Hernández , José Esteban and Maldonado, Rubén Armando (2012), ‘Reducción de /-s/ final de sílaba entre transmigrantes salvadoreños en el sur de Texas’, Lengua y migración / Language and Migration, 4 (2).
Hernandez-Chavez, E. (1994), ‘Language policy in the United States: a history of cultural genocide’, in Tove Skuttnab-Kangas and Robert Phillipson (eds.), Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination (Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter), 141:59.
Hertzler, Joyce (1953), ‘Toward a sociology of language’, Social Forces, (32), 109-19.
Hessel, Stéphane (2011), Indignez-vous (Ceux qui marchent contre le vent: Indigène Editions).
Heyck, Denis Lynn Daly (ed.), (1994), Barrios and Borderlands: cultures of Latinos and Latinas in the United States (London-New York: Routledge).
Higham, John (1992), ‘Crusade for Americanization’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 72-84.
— (1994), ‘Strangers in the Land: Nativism and Nationalism’, in Ronald Takaki (ed.), From Different Shores: Perspectives On Race And Ethnicity In America (2nd edn.; Oxford: Oxford University Press), 67-71.
Himmelsbach, Adam (2012), ‘Standing Up at an Early Age: Views on Gay Rights of Ravens’ Ayanbadejo Are Rooted in Upbringing’, New York Times, 15 september 2012, sec. Sport p. B12.
Hoffman, C. (1991), An Introduction to Bilingualism (London and New York: Longman).
Hoggart, Richard (1958), The Uses of Literacy (London: Penguin Books).
Hogue, Ilyse (2012), ‘Plenary Session on the Future of Pro-Israel: Address’, J Street: Making History (Washington, D.C.).
Holliger, David A. (2004), ‘Choix ou Assignation d’Identité’, L’identité (French edn., Les Mots du Monde; Paris: Editions La Decouverte), 53-69.
Hollis, Rosemary (2012), ‘No friend of democratization: Europe’s role in the genesis of the ‘Arab Spring”, International Affairs, 88 (1), 81-94.
Holloway, Joseph E. and Vass, Winifred K. (1993), The African Heritage of American English (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press) 193.
Holmes, John W. (1981), Life with Uncle: The Canadian-American Relationship (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Homberger, Nancy H (2012), ‘”Until I became a professional, I was not conciously indigenous” One intercultural bilingual educator’s trajectory in Indigenous language revitalization’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Honneth, A (1995), The Struggle for Recognition (Cambridge: Polity Press).
Hope, A.D. (1972), ‘Australia’, in H. Heseltine (ed.), The Penguin Book of Australian Verse (London: Penguin Books), 190.
Horesh, Uri (2012), ‘Adaptation of ‘mixed cities’ in Israel to a new bilingual standard: a critical analysis’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Hornsby, Michael and Wicherkiewicz, Tomasz (2010), ‘Languages in Contact 2010: A Book of Abstracts ‘, in Piotr P. Chruszczewski and Zdzisław Wąsik (eds.), (Philological School in Higher Education, Wrolaw (Poland)).
Hornsby, Michael
Tomasz , Wicherkiewicz (2012), ‘Etre ou ne pas être (une minorité)? Le kachoube en Pologne’, Droit et Culture.
Hornsby, Michael (2012), ‘Geographical shifts and linguistic changes: ‘new’ or ‘urban, speakers of minority languages’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Hornsby, Michael and Wicherkiewicz, Tomasz (2012), ‘Documenting Poland’s heritage Languages: The Challenge of Polish Yiddish’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Horton, John and Caldéron, José (1992), ‘Language Struggles in a Changing California Community’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 186-94.
Horton, John (ed.), (1993), Liberalism, multiculturalism and toleration. (New York: St Martin’s Press).
Howard, John (1997), ‘CHURCHES AND THE NATIVE TITLE DEBATE’, (e-mail).
— (1997), ‘Declaration’, (e.mail).
Howe, Stephen (1998), Afrocentrism: Mythical Pasts and Imagined Homes (London and New York: Verso) 337.
Hryniuk, Stella (ed.), (1992), Twenty Years of Multiculturalism: Successes and Failures (Winnipeg: St John’s College Press) 256.
Huayhua, Margarita (2012), ‘Hierarchical relations among Women in the Southern Andes’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Hudson, R.A. (1980), Sociolinguistics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Hüning, Matthias (2012), ‘Opening Remarks’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Hunter, James Davison (1995), Culture Wars: the struggle to define America (1995: BasicBooks) 416.
Huntington, Samuel (1994), ‘Le choc des civilisations’, Commentaires, 66 (été 1994).
Hyatt, Harry (ed.), (1970), Hoodoo-Conjuraton-Witchcraft-Rootwork (5; Hannibal, MO: Western Publishing Inc).
Hyltenstam, K. and A., Viverg (eds.) (1993), Progression and Regression in Language: Sociocultural, Neuropsychological and linguistic Perspectives (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Hymes, Dell (1974), Foundations in Sociolinguistics: An Ethnographic Approach (Philadelphia,: University of Pennsylvania Press).
Hymes, Dell H. (1987), ‘Foreword’, in Charles A. Ferguson and Shirley Brice Heath (eds.), Language in the USA (1; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 582.
IJSL (1986), ‘The Question of an Official Language: Language Rights and the English Language Amendment’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (60).
Ikeotuonye, Festus C.R.A. (2005), ‘The problem of Order and the “Other”: Racism as a Cosmological Imperative of the Modern Condition’, in Masoud Kamali and Paul Jones (eds.), Racism and Xenophobia: A European Dilemma Session B (Stockholm, Room 361: 37th IIS Conference).
Immam, M. (ed.), (1972), Minorities and the law. (Delhi: The Indian Law Institute).
Inglehart, Ronald F. and Woodward, Margaret (1988), ‘Language Conflicts and Political Community’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 410-23.
Inglis, Christine (1996), ‘Multiculturalism: New policy Responses to Diversity, Most’, (UNESCO).
Isaan, Record ‘Blog’, <http://isaanrecord.com/&gt;, accessed 29 november 2012.
Ivins, Molly and Dubose, Lou (2000), Shrub: The Short but Happy Political Life of George W. Bush (New York: Random House) 179.
Jackson, Jesse (1988), ‘Speech at Ceremonies in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’
— (1988), ‘quotations’.
Jackson, Peter and Penrose, Jan (eds.) (1993), Constructions of Race, Place and Nation (1st edn., London: University College London Press) 216.
Jackson, Jesse (1996), ”Black English’ proposal draws fire’, CNN page on Ebonics; Education secretary: No federal funds for ‘black English’, December 22nd 1996.
Jakubowicz, A., et al. (1994), Racism, Ethnicity and the Media (St Leonards NSW: George Allen & Unwin).
Jarrett, Valerie (2012), ‘Keynote address from the Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Jeambar, Denis (1999), ‘Garder sa langue’, (2504), 5.
Jeffs, Allyson (1993), ‘Canadians Harbor “latently Racist” Attitudes: Poll’, Southam News, 14 décembre.
Jensen, Arthur (1969), ‘How Much Can We Boost IQ and Scholastic Achievement?’ Harvard Educational Review, (39), 1-123.
Jenson, Jane (1993), ‘Naming Nations: Making Nationalist Claims in Canadian Public Discourse’, Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, (29), 385-96.
Jernud, Björn and Joe, Sung-Hwan (1985), ‘Bilingualism as a Resource in the United States’, Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 6, 10-18.
Jessop, B (1999), ‘The Changing Governance of Welfare’, Social Policy and Administration, (33), 348-59.
Jimenez Quispe, Luz (2011), ‘Educacion y descolonizacion en Bolivia, El desarollo de capacidades en interculturalidad en las politicas publicas nacionales y locales’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People.
Jiobu, R.M. (1988), Ethnicity & Assimilation: Blacks, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Mexicans, Vietnamese, and Whites (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press).
John, Balz (1999), ‘Black Pupils Optimistic, Study finds’, Los Angeles Times
Herald Tribune, Aug. 11.12, 1999, p. 3.
Johns, Brian (1991), ‘SBS: Coping with a Strange Idea’, in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn, and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change (Melbourne: Scribe), 13-20.
Johnston, Darlene, M. (1995), ‘Native Rights as Collective Rights: A Question of Group Self-Preservation’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
Jonasson, Jonas (2011), Le vieux qui ne voulait pas fêter son anniversaire, trans. Caroline Berg (Paris: Presses de la Cité (Pocket)).
Joseph, Sara (1999), Interrogating culture: critical perspectives on contemporary social theory (Delhi: Sage).
Jowett, Garth (1976), Film: The Democratic Art (Boston: Little, Brown).
Judd, E.L. (1989), ‘Language Policy at the 100th Congress’, 23d TESOL Convention (San Antonio, Texas).
July, Serge (2002), ‘Affreux’, Libération, 22 avril 2002, p. 3.
Jupp, James (1991), Immigration (Sydney: Sydney University Press).
— (1991), ‘One among many’, in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn, and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia (Melbourne: Scribe), 119:33.
Justice, R.W. Fox (1977), ‘Ranger Uranium Environmental Inquiry: second report’, (Canberra: AGPS).
Kachru, Braj B. (1981), ‘Introduction: The Other Side of English’, in Braj B. Kachru (ed.), The Other Tongue: English Across Cultures (Oxford: Pergamon Press), 1-12.
— (ed.), (1982), The Other Tongue: English Across Cultures (Pergamon Institute of English, Oxford: Pergamon Press) 358.
— (1987), ‘American English and other Englishes’, in Charles A. Ferguson and Shirley Brice Heath (eds.), Language in the USA (1; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 21:43.
— (ed.), (1990), The Alchemy of English:The Spread, Functions, and Models of Non-Native Englishes (Champagne-Urbana: University of Illinois Press).
Kammoun, Raoudha (2009), ‘La place du français dans le plurilinguisme tunisien’, Cahiers de linguistique: Revue de sociolinguistique et de sociologie de la langue française (Agence Universitaire de la francophonie), 34 (1), 21-44.
Kapica, Jack (1993), ‘Canadians want mosaïc to melt, survey finds: Respondents believe immigrants should adopt Canada’s values’, The Globe and Mail.
Kaplan, Robert B. (1997), ‘Foreword, Palmam qui meruit Ferat’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), xi-xxiii.
Karmis, Dimitrios (1993), ‘Cultures autochtones et libéralisme au Canada: les vertus médiatrice du communautarisme libéral de CHARLES tAYLOR’, Canadian Review of Political Science, (26/1), 69-96.
Karmitz, Marin (1995), Bande à Part (Grasset).
— (1997), ‘La mondialisation de l’audiovisuel’, LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE – -, (MAI), Page 27.
Katz, Molly (1991), Jewish as a second language (New York: Workman publishing).
Kawabata, Tai (1999), ‘Flag, anthem views vary among pollees’, The Japan Times, Aug.6, p. 1.
— (1999), ‘Identity of “Kimigayo” composer still a mystery’, The Japan Times, Aug.6, p. 1.
Keen, Ian (1988), ‘Aborigines and Islanders in Australian Society’, in Jake M. Najman and Western John S. (eds.), A Sociology of Australian Society: Introductory Readings (Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia Pty), 213-52.
Kenaz, Yehoshua (2003), Paysage aux trois arbres, trans. Rosie Pinhas-Delpuech (Actes Sud) 306.
— (2003), Infiltration, trans. Rosie Pinhas-Delpuech (Stock) 530.
Keneally, Thomas (1995), A River Town (London: Sceptre) 330.
Kennedy, John F (1961), ‘KENNEDY’S SPEECH IN PARIS’, in to Général de Gaulle (ed.), (Paris).
Keon-Cohen, B. and Morse, B. (1984), ‘Indigenous Land Rights in Australia and Canada’, in P. Hanks and Keon-Cohen B. (eds.), Aborigenes and the Law (Sydney: George Allen and Unwin), 74.
Khare, R.S. (1988), Culture and democracy (Lanham: University Press of America,).
Khoury, Fady (2012), ‘High Court ruling on ‘Nakba Law’ reveals its waning power’, [Blog], <http://972mag.com/high-court-ruling-on-nakba-bill-reveals-its-waning-power/32271/&gt;, accessed Saturday, January 7 2012

Kim, Kwang Chung (ed.), (1999), Koreans in the Hood: Conflict with African Americans (Baltimore and London: John Hopkins University Press) 250.
Kim, L.S. and Blasini, Gilberto Moisés (2001), ‘The Performance of Multicultural Identity in US Network Television: Shiny, Happy Popstars (Holding Hands)’, Emergences, 11 (2), 287-07.
Martin Luther King’s Acceptance Speech, on the occasion of the award of the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo (1964) (December 10).
Klima, Edward S. (1964), ‘Negation in English’, in J.A. Fodor and J.J. Katz (eds.), The structure of language: readings in the philosophy of language (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall).
Kloss, Heinz (1966), Exerpts from the National Minoritiy Laws of the United States of America (Honolulu: East-West Center).
— (1977), The American Bilingual Tradition (Rowley, MA: Newbury House).
Koechlin, Simon (2009), ‘L’épée de Damoclès du référendum’, Horizons, Le Magazine Suisse de la Recherche Scientifique, (86), 24.
Kohut, Matthew
John, Neffinger
Seth, Pendleton (2012), ‘Making the Case: Public Speaking for Pro-Israel. Pro-Peace Advocates’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Kompridis, N. (2008), ‘Struggling Over the Meaning of Recognition’, in K. Olson (ed.), Adding Insult to Injury, (London: Verso).
Koppelman, Andrew (1998), Antidiscrimination Law & Social Equality (New Haven and London: Yale University Press) 276.
Koppes, Clayton R. and Black, Gregory D. (1987), Hollywood Goes to War: How Politics, Profits, and Propaganda shaped World War II Movies (New York: The Free Press).
Kosonen, Kimmo and Guttman, Cynthia (1994), A Notre Portée: l’histoire de PROPEL, projet d’education non-formelle pour les enfants ruraux en Inde.: ( Paris: UNESCO).
Kosonen, Kimmo (1998), ‘What makes an education project work? Conditions for successful functioning of an Indian primary-level programme of nonformal education. ‘ Publications in Education (41; Joensuu, Finland: University of Joensuu).
— (2002), ‘Vernacular literacy in community development: the Chong of Thailand. ‘ in J. Lo Bianco (ed.), Voices from Phnom Penh. Development & Language: Global Influences & Local Effects (Melbourne: Language Australia), 243-60.
— (2003), ‘ Community participation in minority language education in Thailand. ‘ Journal of Southeast Asian Education, 4 (1), 104-36.
— (2005), ‘Vernaculars in literacy and basic education in Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. (): .
‘ Current Issues in Language Planning, 6 (2), 122-42.
— (2006), ‘Multigrade teaching among ethnic minority children: the language issue. I’, in Linley Cornish (ed.), Reaching EFA through multi-grade teaching: Issues, contexts and practices (Armidale, NSW, Australia:: Kardoorair Press), 239-58.
— (2008), ‘Literacy in local languages in Thailand: Language maintenance in a globalised world’, . International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualis, 11 (2), 170-88.
Kosonen, Kimmo and Benson, Carol (2010), ‘ Language-in-education policy and practice in Southeast Asia in light of the findings from Ethiopia.

‘ in K. Heugh and T. Skutnabb-Kangas (ed.), Multilingual education works: From the periphery to the centre (New Delhi: Orient Black Swan), 134-63.
Koubi, Geneviève (1993), ‘Droit, Droit à la Différence, Droit à l’Indifférence en France’, Revue Trimestrielle des Droits de l’Homme, (1er avril 1993).
— (1995), ‘Penser les minorités en droit’, in A. Fenet (ed.), Le droit et les minorités – analyses et textes (Bruxelles: Bruylant).
— (1998), ‘La République Française face aux minorités: silences et réticences’, in Nicolas Levrat (ed.), Quatrième colloque international du Centre international de la common law en français: Minorités et organisation de l’Etat (Bruxelles: Bruylant).
— (2000), ‘Penser les Minorités en Droit’, in Alain Fenet, Geneviève Koubi, and Isabelle Schulte-Tenckhoff (eds.), Le Droit et les Minorités: analyses et textes (2ème edn., Organisatiion Internationale et Relations internationales; Bruxelles: Bruylant), 385-468.
— (2002), ‘Traductions et Droit’, Droit et Cultures, 44, 9-19.
Koubi, Geneviève and Romy-Masliah, Daphné (eds.) (2012), S’entendre sur la langue (Droit et Cultures, 63; Paris: L’Harmattan) 200.
— (2012), ‘Présentation’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 11-22.
Kourouma, Ahmadou (2000), Allah n’est pas obligé (Paris: Editions du Seuil) 233.
Krämer, Gudrun (2008), A History of Palestine. From the Ottoman conquest to the
founding of the State of Israel (Princeton / Oxford,: Princeton University Press).
Kristeva (1981), Le langage, cet inconnu (2ème edn., Points Essais, 125; Paris: Editions du Seuil) 327.
Kroch, Antony and Labov, William (1972), ‘Resolution in Response to Arthur Jensen (1969)’, Linguistic Society of America Bulletin, 17-18.
Kukathas, Chandran. (1992), ‘Are there cultural rights?’ Political Theory, 1 (20), 105-39.
Kukathas, Chandran (ed.), (1993.), Multicultural citizens: the philosophy and politics of identity (St. Leonard’s: Center for Independent Study).
— (1995), ‘Are there Any Cultural Rights?’ in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
Kumar, Ravindra (2009), Non-Cooperation (World Peace Movement Trust) 32.
— (2012), Fundamental Structures of Buddhism: The Law of Change and the Principle of Self-Reliance (World Peace Movement Trust) 30.
Kuper, Leo and Smith, M.G. ((eds.) (1969), Pluralism in Africa. (Berkeley: University of California Press).
Kymlicka, Will (1989), Liberalism, Community and Culture (Oxford: Clarendon Press).
— (1995), Multicultural Citizenship, eds David Miller and Alan Ryan (Oxford Political Theory; Oxford: Clarendon Press) 280.
— (ed.), (1995), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 387.
— (1995), Multicultural Citizenship:: A Liberal Theory of Minority Rights, eds David Miller and Alan Ryan (Oxford Political Theory; Oxford: Clarendon Press) 280.
— (1999), ‘Theorizing Indigenous Rights’, University of Toronto Law Journal, 281-93.
— (2000), ‘Le droit des minorités et le multiculturalisme: l’évolution du débat anglo-américain’, Comprendre, Revue de philosophie et de sciences sociales, (1), 141-72.
— (2009), ‘Categorizing Groups, Categorizing States: Theorizing Minority Rights in a World of Deep Diversity’, Ethics & International Affairs, 23 (4), 371-88.
— (2009), ‘Categorizing Groups, Categorizing States: Theorizing Minority Rights in a World of Deep Diversity’, Ethics & International Affairs, 23 (4), 371-88.
La Gorce (de), Paul-Marie (1996), Le Dernier Empire (Paris: Grasset).
Labov, William (1968), ‘A Study of the Non-Standard English of Negro and Puerto Rican Speakers in New York City: Phonological and Grammatical Analysis’, in Paul Cohen (ed.), The Use of language in the Speech Community (New York: Columbia University).
— (1972), Sociolinguistic Patterns (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press).
— (1972), Language in the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press) 412.
— (1976), Sociolinguistique, trans. Alain Kihm (Le sens commun; Paris: Editions de Minuit).
— (1982), ‘Objectivity and commitment in linguistic science: the case of the Black English trial in Ann Arbor’, Language in Society, 11 (2), 165-201.
— (1993), Le Parler Ordinaire: la Langue dans les Ghettos noirs des Etats-Unis, trans. Alain Kihm (Paris: Editions de Minuit) 519.
Labov (1997), ‘Testimony on “Ebonics” given January 23rd before the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education of
the Senate Appropriations Committee.’ (Washington: Senate).
Labov, William (1998), ‘Co-existent Systems in African-American Vernacular English’, in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Rootledge), 110-53.
— (1999), ‘Foreword’, in John Baugh (ed.), Out of the Mouths of Slaves: African American Language and Educational Malpractice (Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press), ix-xi.
Labrie, Normand (1993), La construction linguistique de la Communauté européenne (Coll. Politique Linguistique: Champion).
Ladmiral, Jean-René and Lipiansky, Edmond Marc (1989), La Communication Interculturelle (Bibliothèque Européenne des Sciences de l’Education; Paris: Armand Colin) 319.
Lafkioui, Mena (2011), ‘French-Based Minority Websites: Multilingualism, multimodality and Identity: Construction in Computer-mediated Discourse’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Lakoff, G and Johnson, M. (1980), Metaphors We Live By (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
Lakshmanan, V (2010), ‘Metaphors as Problematizer in Legal Language translation: A case-Study of the Kushboo Case’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Lambert, R.D. (1989), ‘The National Foreign Language System’, (Washington, D.C.: National Foreign Language Center at John Hopkins University).
Lamont, Michèle (ed.), (1999), The Cultural Territories of Race: Black and White Boundaries (University of Chicago Press) 413.
Lang, Jack (1982), ‘législation’, Journal Officiel, (3 novembre 1982), 6-7.
— (1982), ‘Allocution’, Conférence de Mexico (Archives du Ministère de la Culture), 6-7.
Langan, Fred (1996), ‘Quebec’s Premier urges Separatists to ease war on English Speakers’, Christian Science Monitor, (6 mars), 6.
Lapierre, J.W. (1988), Le Pouvoir Politique et les Langues: Babel Et Leviathan (Paris: PUF).
Laurens, Henry (2012), ‘La Genèse du conflit Israelo-Palestinien’, paper given at Cercle Martin Buber, Uni Bastions, Genève, 17 janvier
Lave, J (1988), Cognition in Practive (Boston Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press).
Lazare, Daniel (2000), ‘UNE DÉMOCRATIE EN VOIE DE FOSSILISATION : Cette pesante Constitution américaine’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (Février 2000), 3.
Le Guin, Ursula K ‘Femmes, Rêves, Dragons’.
Leacock, Eleanor (1986), ‘The Montagnais-Naskapi of the Labrador Peninsula’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 150-79.
Leap, William L. (1987), ‘American Indian languages’, in Charles A. Ferguson and Shirley Brice Heath (eds.), Language in the USA (1; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 116:44.
Lee, Spike (1987), Spike Lee’s Gotta Have It: Inside Guerrilla Filmmaking (New York: Fireside Press).
Leibner, Isi (2012), ‘Olmert Honors J Street’, [Blog], < http:///wordfromjerusalem.com&gt;, accessed march 18th, 2012 :32 a.m. .
Lema, Luis (2003), ‘Vivre à Tel-Aviv: Yehoshua Kenaz: les reflets intimes d’un pays en guerre’, Le Temps, 4 octobre, p. 46.
— (2003), ‘Petites histoires sans importance: Israël’, Le Temps, 4 octobre, p. 46.
Lemco, Jonathan (1992), ‘Quebec’s “Distinctive Character” and the Question of Minority Rights’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 423-33.
Lequeret, Elisabeth (1998), ‘Un monde de combats, de rèves et de désirs : L’Afrique filmée par des femmes’, Le Monde Diplomatique, ( AOÛT 1998), Page 11.
Leslie, Peter M. (1994), ‘ Asymmetry: Rejected, Conceded, Imposed.’ in F.L. Seidle (ed.), A la Recherche d’un nouveau Contrat politique pour le Canada: Options asymétriques et options confédérales (Québec: Institute for Research on Public Policy), 37-70.
Levasseur, Catherine (2012), ‘Moi j’suis pas francophone.’ paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Levin, Michael (ed.), (1993), Ethnicity and aboriginality: case studies in ethno-nationalism (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Levine, Marc (1991), The Reconquest of Montreall: Language Policy and Social Change in a Bilingual City (Temple University Press) 320.
Levy, Jacob (1997), ‘Classifying Cultural Rights’, in Ian Shapiro and Will Kymlicka (eds.), Ethnicity and Group Rights (New York: New York University Press).
Lewis, Jonathan Eric (2004), ‘Freedom of Speech – in Any Language’, Middle East Quarterly
(Summer ), 37-46.
Li, P.S. (1988), Ethnic Inequality in a Class Society (Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing, Inc).
Lijphard, Arendt (1977), Democracy in plural societies (New Haven:: Yale University Press).
Livneh, Neri ‘Perhaps Arabs can save Hebrew from demise’.
— (2012), ‘Oy Gevalt: The German origins of Hebrew words’, Haaretz, Sep.14.
Lo Bianco, Joseph (1987), ‘National Policy on Languages’, (Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service).
— (1997), ‘English and Pluralistic Policies: The Case of Australia’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), 107–19.
— (1999), ‘Discussion’, (Tokyo).
— (2008), ‘Educational Linguistics and Education Systems’, in Spolsky Bernard and Hult F (eds.), Blackwell Handbook of Education Linguistics (Maldon and Oxford: Blackwell), 113-27.
Loban, Walter (1966), ‘The languages of elementary school children’, (Champaign, Illinois: National Council of Teachers of English).
— (1966), ‘Language ability, grades seven, eight and nine’, (Washington, D.C.: US Governement Printing Office).
Lochak, Danièle (1989), ‘Les minorités et le droit public français: du refus des différences à la gestion des différences’, in Alain Fenet and Gérard Soulier (eds.), Les minorités et leurs droits depuis 1789 (Paris: L’Harmattan), 111 et ss.
Lockwood, D. (1996), ‘Civic Integration and Class Formation’, British Journal of Sociology, (47), 531-50.
Loewen, J.W. (1995), Lies My Teachers Told Me (New York: Routledge).
Loman, Bengt (1967), Conversations in a Negro American dialect (Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics).
Louisiana, Association of Scholars (1995), ‘student services and the culture wars’, 1 (Spring 1995).
Lyons, Noel. (1984), Aboriginal self-government: rights of citizenship and access to government services (Kingston: Institute of Intergovernmental Relations).
Lyons, Charles (1997), The New Censors: Movies and the Culture Wars (Philadelphia: Temple University Press).
MacBride, S (1980), ‘Many Voices, One World’, (Paris: International Commission for the Study of Communication Problems, UNESCO).
Macdonald, Ian (1989), ‘Group rights’, Philosophical Papers, 2 ( 28), 117-36.
Macedo, Stephen (1990), Liberal virtues: citizenship, virtue and community (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Machan, T.W. and Ch.T., Scott (1992), English in its Social Contexts: Essays in Historical Sociolinguistics, (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
MacIntyre, Alasdair (1993), Quelle Justice? Quelle Rationalité?, trans. M. Vignaux d’Hollande (Paris: P.U.F.).
Mackey, W.F. (1976), Bilinguisme et Contact des Langues (Paris: Klingsieck).
Madan, T.N (ed.), (1991.), Religion in India ( Delhi:: Oxford University Press).
Mahajan, Gurpreet (1997), Identities and rights: aspects of liberal democracy in India (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Mahajan, Gurpreet (ed.), (1998), Democracy, difference and social justice (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Mahajan, Gurpreet (1999), ‘MULTICULTURALISM, a symposium on democracy in culturally diverse societies’, (Delhi).
Irshad Manji and Bill Maher Debate France’s Burqa Ban (2011) (15 april 2011).
Mahmood, Tahir (1991.), Minorities and state in Indian law. (Delhi: Institute of Objective Studies).
Majone, Giandomenico (1990), ‘Preservation of cultural diversity in a federal system: the role of the regions’, in Mark Tshnet (ed.), Comparative constitutional federalism ( New York: Greenwood Press).
Makinson, David (1988), ‘A Logician’s Point of View’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 69-92.
Makkai, Toni and McAllister, Ian (1988), ‘Immigrants in Australian Society: Backgrounds, Attainment and Politics’, in Jake M. Najman and Western John S. (eds.), A Sociology of Australian Society: Introductory Readings (Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia Pty), 178-212.
Malan, Koos.
Malet, Albert and Isaac, Jules (1959), L’Histoire, 4 vols. (aout 1994 edn., 2: Librairie Hachette) 1242.
Maley, William , Sampford , Charles , and Thakur, Ramesh (eds.) (2002), From Civil Strife to Civil Society: Civil and Military responsibilities in disrupted states (UN Series on Foundations of Peace, Tokyo: United Nations University Press).
Maltby, Richard (1995), Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction (Oxford: Blackwell).
Mantel, Hilary (2009), Wolf Hall (1st edn.; London: Fourth Estate) 652.
Margalit, Avishai and Halbertal, .Moshe (1994), ‘ Liberalism and the right to culture’, Social Research, 3 ( 61), 491-510.
Marger, Martin N. (1991), Race and Ethnic Relations: American and Global Perspectives (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company).
Marschall, Miklos (2009), ‘Turkey, Democracy and Interdependence: Open society or “Valley of the Wolves”‘, Interdependence Day: Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
Marsh, George (1860), ‘Lectures on the English Language’.
Marsh, John (2011), ‘Class Dismissed: Why we cannot teach or learn our Way out of Inequality, ‘ Monthly Review Press, New York.
Marshall, David F. (1986), ‘The Question of an Official Language: language rights and the English Language Amendment’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (60), 7.
Marshall, C., Mitchell, D., and Wirt, F. (1989), Culture and Education Policy in the American States (New York: Falmer Press).
Marshall, T.H. (1992 [1950]), ‘Citizenship and Social Class’, in T Bottomore (ed.), Citizenship and Social Class (London: Pluto Press).
Martel, Angéline (1996), ‘Language Planning,Ideology and Constitutional Law: Francophone Minority Education in Canada’, Language Problems and Language Planning, 20 (Eté 1996), 127-56.
Martel, Marcel and Pâquet, Martin (eds.) (2008), Légiférer en matière linguistique (Québec: Les Presses Universitaires Laval) 450.
Martin, Lawrence (1995), Chrétien, the Will to Win (Toronto: Lester Publishing).
Martinez-Cobo (1984), ‘Study of the Problem of Discrimination against Indigenous Populations’, (Geneva: International Labour Organization).
Martiniello, Marco (1995), L’ethnicité dans les sciences sociales contemporaines (Que Sais-Je ?, 2997; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France) 127.
Marty, Martin E. and Appleby, R. Scott (eds.) (1991), Fundamentalisms observed (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
Masland, Tom (1999), ‘Looking for their Roots: On the West Coast of Africa, where millions of slaves saw their homeland for the last time, African-Americans now search for the memories of their ancestors’, Newsweek, 72.
Mason, Andrew. (1990), ‘Autonomy, liberalism and state neutrality’, Philosophical Quarterly, 160 ( 40), 433-52.
Massey, Douglas S. (ed.), (1987), Return to Azlan, The Social Process of International Migration from Western Mexico (Berkeley: University of California Press).
— (1988), ‘Economic Development and Interantional Migrations’, Population and Development Review, (14.3), 383-413.
Matthiasson, John S. (1986), ‘The Maritime Inuit: Life on the Edge’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 78-114.
Maurais, Jacques (ed.), (1987), Politique et aménagement linguistique (Québec et Paris: Conseil de la langue française; Le Robert).
Maveyraud, Cécile (2001), ‘Les Piments de la colère’, Télérama, (2672), 94-96.
M’Bow, Amadou M. (1985), ‘Introduction au débat général sur Plan 1984-89 à la quatrième session of la Conference Générale’, (Paris: UNESCO).
McAndrew, M (1993), The Integration of Ethnic Minority Students Fifteen Years after Bill 101: Some Issues Confronting Montreal’s French Language Public Schools (Montréal: Université de Montréal, Centre d’Etudes Ethniques).
McArthur, Tom (1998), The English Languages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) 248.
McCann, Colum (1998), This Side of Brightness (London-Berlin-New York: Phoenix) 249.
— (2009), Let the Great World Spin (London-Berlin-New York: Bloomsbury).
McCutcheon, Andrew (1991), ‘Victoria’s Multicultural Agenda’, in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn, and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change (Melbourne: Scribe), 80-87.
McGroarty, Mary (1996), ‘Multilingualism in the U.S. federal system: equity or expediency?’ in AAAL (ed.), American Association of Applied Linguistics (AAAL) Conference (Chicago, Illinois).
— (1997), ‘Language policy in the USA: National Values, Local Loyalties, Pragmatic Pressures’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), 67-90.
McMurchy, Megan (1994), ‘The Documentary’, in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin), 179-201.
McNeill, William (1986), Polyethnicity and national unity in world history (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
McRae, Kenneth. (1979), ‘The plural society and the western political tradition.’ Canadian Journal of Political Science, 4 (12), 675-88.
McRae, Kenneth (1979), ‘The plural society and the western political tradition’, Canadian Journal of Political Science, 4 (12), 675-88.
McSweeney, Bill (2003), ‘Flawed US Perspectives’, the Irish Time, June 21, 2003, p. 13.
Meewis, M. (2010), ‘Adapting to the subaltern: colonial Management of linguistic Diversity in the Belgian Congo (1880-1960)’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Mehedi, Mustapha (1999), ‘L’éducation multiculturelle et interculturelle et la protection des minorités.’ Revue Québécoise de Droit International, 12 (1), 25-32.
Mendus, Susan (1989), Toleration and the limits of liberalism (Atlantic Highlands: New Jersey: Humanities Press).
Meyer, David (2011), ‘Parce que la Bible n’est pas un cadastre’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 81-86.
— (2012), ‘La Bible n’est pas un cadastre’, in JCall Switzerland (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Genève).
Mikes, George (1968), Mortal Passion (2nd edn.; Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books) 218.
Miller, Virginia (1986), ‘The Micmac: A Maritime Woodland Group’, in B. Morrison and Wilson R. (eds.), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 347-74.
Miller, David (1995), On Nationality (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Miller, Sarah (2012), ‘Sage publishing’, paper given at 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence, Los Angeles, September 8th, 2012.
Mills, Charles W. (1998), Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press) 244.
Milner, Jean-Claude (1995), Introduction à une science du langage (Points Essais, 300; Paris: Editions du Seuil).
— (2006), Le juif de savoir (Points Essais: Grasset).
Minow, Maratha (1990), Making all the difference: inclusion, exclusion and American law (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press).
Mitchell-Kernan, Claudia (1969), ‘Language behavior in a black urban community’, (Berkeley, California: Language Behavior Research Laboratory).
Mizubayashi, Akira (2011), Une langue venue d’ailleurs (Coll. L’un et l’autre: Gallimard ) 280.
Modood, Tariq (1992), Not easy being British: colour, culture and citizenship (Stoke-on-Trent: Trentham Books).
Modood, Tariq. (1994), ‘Establishment, multiculturalism and British citizenship’, Political Quarterly, 1 ( 65), 53-73.
Moffett, Samuel E. (1972), The Americanization of Canada (Toronto).
Moisy, Claude (1996), L’Amérique en marche arrière (Département Hachette Références, 1; Paris: Hachette Livre) 238.
Mongin, Olivier (1995), ‘Le spectre du multiculturalisme américain: Retour sur une controverse: du “politiquement correct ” au multiculturalisme’, Esprit, (Juin 1991), 83-87.
Montgomery, Michael (1999), ‘Eiteenth-Century Sierra Leone English: Another exported variety of African American English’, English World-Wide, 1 (20), 1-34.
Morawska, Ewa (2005), ‘Immigrants and Citizenship: An Ethnographic Assessment’, in Masamichi Sasaki (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Migration and Citizenship (Stockholm, Norra Latin, Aula 3d Floor: University of Essex).
Morgan, Marcyliena (1998), ‘More than an mood or an attitude: discourse and verbal genres in African-American Culture’, in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Routledge), 251-81.
Morris, L.D. and Llewellyn, T. (1991), ‘Social Security Provision for the Unemployed: A Report for the Social Security Advisory Committee’, (London: HMSO Citizenship and human rights 45).
Morris, Lydia (1994), Dangerous Classes (London: Routledge).
Morris, Lydia (2006 ), ‘Social Rights, Transnational Rights, and Civic Stratification’, in Lydia Morris (ed.), Rights: Sociological Perspectives (London: Routledge).
— (2007 ), ‘New Labour’s Community of Rights’, Journal of Social Policy, (36), 39-57.
— (2009), ‘An Emergent Cosmopolitan Paradigm? – Asylum,Welfare and Human Rights’, British Journal of Sociology, ( 60), 215-315.
Morris, Lydia (2009 ), ‘Civic Stratification and the Cosmopolitan Ideal: The Case of Welfare and Asylum’, European Societies (11), 603-24.
Morris, Lydia (2012 ), ‘Citizenship and Human Rights’, The British Journal of Sociology 2, 63 (1).
Morrison, B. and R., Wilson (1986), Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart).
— (1986), ‘On the Study of Native Peoples’, Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart), 13-21.
Moscato, M. and J., Wittwer (1978), La Psychologie du Langage (Que-Sais-Je?; Paris: PUF).
Mouillon, Philippe (1995), ‘Un voisinage mondial’, in Jean-Pierre Saez (ed.), Identités, Cultures et Territoires (Paris: Desclée de Brouwer), 263-67.
Mufwene, Slikoko S. (1997), ‘Gullah Development: Myth and Socio-historical Evidence’, in Cynthia Berstein, Thomas Nunnally, and Robin Rabino (eds.), Language Variety in the South Revisited (The University of Alabama Press).
Mufwene, Slikoko S., et al. (eds.) (1998), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Routledge) 314.
Mufwene, Slikoko S. and Rickford, John R. (1998), ‘Introduction to African-American English: Structure, History and Use’, (London: Routledge), 1-.
Mufwene, Salikoko (2011), ‘Pourquoi le français en Afrique Noire n’a pas évolué commen en Amérique du Nord, aux Antilles ou dans l’Océan Indien.’ paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Muhlhausler, P. (1986), Pidgin and Creole Linguistics (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Mulgan, Richard (1989), Maori, Pakeha and democracy (Auckland: Oxford University Press).
Murray, Scott (ed.), (1994), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin) 350.
Murray, Scott, Caputo, Raffaele, and Thoridnet, Claudine (1994), ‘Filmography: one hundred and fifty Australian films’, in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin), 227-318.
Murray, Scott (1994), ‘Australian directors overseas 1970-1992’, in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin), 149-78.
Musehane, N. (2010), ‘Language shift: a Case of the department of safety and security (Police Service) in the Limpopo Province, SA. In Law’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Mutombo, Kanyana (2002), ‘Duel entre victimes: Juifs vs. Noirs…’ Regards Africains, (47/48), 62-63.
— (2002), ‘Comment les Noirs se sont eux-mêmes oubliés à Strasbourg’, Regards Africains, (47/48), 58-59.
Mydans, Seth (1999), ‘Reluctantly, Australia opts to save the Queen’, International Herald Tribune (New York Times Service), Monday, November 8, 1999, p. 1 &10.
Naby, Eden (2007), ‘Theater, Language and Inter-Ethnic Exchange Assyrian Performance Before WWI’, Iranian Studies, (40:4), 501 – 10.
Nagata, Judith (1984), The reflowering of Malaysian Islam: from peasant roots to religious radicals (Vancouver:: University of British Columbia Press).
Nahir, Moshe (1984), ‘Language Planning Goals’, Language Problems and Language Planning, (8), 294-327.
Naima, RAPPORTEUR (2009), ‘Women, Islam and Interdependence Day’, Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
Najman, Jake M. and Western, John S. (eds.) (1988), A Sociology of Australian Society: Introductory Readings (Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia Pty).
NCES (1992), ‘Public elementary and secondary school agencies in the US and outlying areas: school year 1990-91’, (Washington, D.C.: National Center for Education Statistics).
NCFLIS (1985), ‘The Training of, and US Business’ Needs for, International Specialists’, National Council for Foreign Language Education and International Studies (University of Massachusetts at Amherst: National Council for Foreign Language Education and International Studies).
NEA (1988), ‘Official English/English Only: More Than Meets the Eye’, (Washington: National Education Association).
Neale, Steve (1976), ‘New Hollywood Cinema’, Screen, 17 (2), 117-22.
Neale, Steve and Smith, Murray (eds.) (1998), Contemporary Hollywood Cinema (Routledge) 338.
Nettheim, Garth (1988), ‘”Peoples” and “Populations” – Indigenous Peoples and Rights of Peoples’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 107-26.
Newitz, Annalee (1993), ‘Alien Abductions and the End of White People’, Bad Subjects Web page, (5).
Nicolaï, Robert (2011), ‘Clivage et fonction du clivage. Sémiotique interactionnelle, procès de construction des signes et subversion de la notion de contact.’ paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Nora, Pierre (2011), ‘Pour un sursaut de la volonté et de la raison’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 87-89.
Nourissier, François (2001), A Défaut de Génie (Folio; Paris: Gallimart) 441-43.
Novak, Michael (1971), The Rise of the Unmeltable Ethnics: Politics and Culture in the Seventies (New York: Macmillan).
Novak Lukanovic, Sonja (2012), ‘Multiculturalism in Border Towns in Slovenia’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Novell-Smith, Geoffrey (ed.), (1996), The Oxford History of World Cinema (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Nowicki, Joanna, Oustinoff, Michaël, and Chartier, Anne-Marie (2010), ‘Les Langues de Bois: Introduction’, Hermès, (58), 9-12.
Null, Gary (1993), Black Hollywood: From 1970 to Today (New York: Citadel Press Book) 222.
Nunan, D. (1992), Understanding language classrooms (New York: Prentice Hall).
O’Flatharta, Peadar (2012), ‘Official Languages Act (Ireland) 2003: a review to row back rights and institutional obligations’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
— (2012), ‘Official Languages Act (Ireland) 2003: a review to row back rights and institutional obligations’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Oberoi (1994), The construction of religious boundaries: culture, identity and diversity in the Sikh tradition (Harjot.. Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Kanehsatake, 270 years of resistance (1990) (Film).
O’Bryan, K. , Reitz, J., and Kuplowska, O. (1976), ‘Non-Official languages: A study in Canadian Multiculturalism’, (Ottawa: Supply and Services).
OCDE (1987), ‘l’Education Multiculturelle’, (Paris: Centre pour la Recherche et l’Innovation dans l’Enseignement).
OCR, Office for Civil Rights (1995), ‘Annual report to Congress’, (U. S. Department of Education).
O’Donnel, Paul (1997), ‘Language Policies and Independence Policies in Quebec’, Language Problems and Language Planning, 21 (2), 162-69.
Ogbu, J (1978), Minority Education and Caste (New York: Academic Press).
— (1992), ‘Understanding multicultural Education’, Educational Researcher, 5 (14), 24.
Ohmann, Tichard (ed.), (1996), Making and Selling Culture (Hanover: Wesleyan University Press).
O’Laoire, Muiris (2007), ‘Anglais et Irlandais: Hybridité dans un Espace de Tansition’, in Daphné Romy and Larissa Aronin (eds.), L’Anglais et les Cultures: Carrefour ou Frontière? (Droit et Cultures, 54; Paris: L’Harmattan).
Olszewski, L. (1997), ‘Oakland Teachers Put Ebonics to the Real World Test”‘, The San Francisco Chronicle, Jan.17, 1997.
Onishi, Norimitsu (1996), ‘And now has come the time of the “Asiamericans”‘, The New York Times, 14 juin.
Oommen, T.K. (1997), Citizenship, nationality and ethnicity: reconciling competing identities (Cambridge: Polity Press,).
ORG ‘Building Bridges for Global Security’, <http://www.oxfordresearchgroup.org.uk/&gt;.
Ossipow, William (ed.), (2005), Israel et l-Autre (Genève: Labor et Fides) 245.
Ost, François (2009), Traduire. Défense et illustration du multilinguisme (« Ouvertures »: Fayard ) 421.
Osuna, Juan José (1949), A History of Education in Puerto Rico (Rio Pedras: Universidad de Puerto Rico) 342.
Owens, Jonathan (ed.), (2000), Contributions to the Sociology of Language (83) xii+458.
Oz, Amos (2012), ‘Keynote address’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Ozolins, Uldis (1988), ‘Goverment language policy initiatives and the future of ethnic languages in Australia (II)’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (72), 113-29.
— (1988), ‘Government language policy initiatives and the future of ethnic languages in Australia’, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, (72), 113-29.
Padilla, Amado M. et al. (1991), ‘The English-Only Movement: Myths, Reality, and
Implications for Psychology’, American Psychology, (Feb.), 120.
Page, Clarence (1989), ‘African American or Black? It’s debatable”‘, Detroit Free Press, January 1, 1989, p. A1, A 12.
Painchaud, G. (1993), ‘L’enseignement des langues aux jeunes Québecois des communatués culturelles: Politiques et Programmes’, Journal of the Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics, (15), 7-22.
Palmer, E (2007 ), Judicial Review, Socioeconomic Rights, and the Human Rights Act, (Oxford: Hart).
Parain, B. (1942), Recherches sur la Nature et les fonctions du Langage (Paris: Idées Gallimard).
Pardo, Carlos (1997), ‘CINQUANTENAIRE DU FESTIVAL DE CANNES’, LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE, (MAI), 26 et 27.
— (1998), ’51e FESTIVAL DE CANNES :Marketing contre cinéma d’auteur’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (11 mai), 28.
— (1999), ’52e FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL DU FILM DE CANNES: Le cinéma, apanage de quelques nations’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (11 mai).
Parekh, Bhikhu (1988), ‘ Equality, fairness and limits of diversity. ‘Innovation’ ‘, education: from shame to struggle (3: Clevedon: Multilingual Matters ltd), 289-308.
— (1995), ‘The Rushdie Affair: Research Agenda for Political Philosophy’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 387.
— (1997), ‘‘Equality in a multicultural society’, in J. Franklin (ed.), Equality (London: Institute for Public Policy Research).
Parekh, Biku (1999), ‘What is multiculturalism?’ MULTICULTURALISM, a symposium on democracy in culturally diverse societies (Delhi).
— (2009), ‘Interdependence Day: Keynote address’, in Benjamin Barber (ed.), Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
Parry, Geraint. (1991(1985)), ‘Paths to citizenship’, in Ursula Vogel and Michael Moran (ed.), The frontiers of citizenship (New York: St Martin’s Press).
Pascal-Moussellard, Olivier (2000), ‘Melting Poste: Les Télévisions ethniques aux Etats-Unis’, Télérama, 19 avril, p. 82-86.
Paton, Alan (1948), Cry, the beloved country 316.
Payne, Richard (1998), Getting Beyond Race: The Changing American Culture (Westview Press; Boulder, Colorado: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.) 240.
Alaskan Native Brotherhood, a documentary (1999).
PDI.
Pear, Robert (1992), ‘New Look at the U.S. in 2050: Bigger, Older and Less White’, New York Times, 4 décembre, p. 1,10, sec.A.
Peillon, Vincent (2011), ‘Discours à la conférence de JCall à Paris’, in JCall (ed.), (Paris).
Sommes nous encore un peuple politique? (2011) (France Culture, 04.06.2011 – 09:10 ).
— (2011), Eloge du Politique: Une introduction au XXIème siècle (Paris: Seuil).
Pelouas, Anne (1998), ‘Victoire en demi-teinte pour le Parti québécois de Lucien Bouchard’, Le Monde, Mercredi 2 décembre 1998.
Pendakur, R. (1990), ‘Speaking in Tongues: Heritage Language Maintenance and Transfer in Canada’, (Ottawa: Secretary of State, Multiculturalism and Citizenship Sector).
Peplow (1958), History of Arizona (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing).
Peres, Shimon (2012), ‘Welcome remarks by video’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Perrot, Michel (1986), ‘Les moyens de communication publique chez les Inuits: Etude antropologique du développement de la radio et de la télévision au Groenland, au Canada et en Alaska’, (Bordeaux 3).
Pfänder, Stefan and Dermarkar, Cyntha (2011), ‘Le français au Caire: Une (première) étude micro-écologique’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Phillips, Anne (1993), Democracy and difference (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania State University).
— (1994), ‘ Dealing with difference: a politics of ideas or a politics of presence? ‘ Constellations’ 1(1), 74-91.
— (1995), The Politics of Presence: Issues in Democracy and Group Representation (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Picard, Georges (1999), Petit traité à l’usage de ceux qui ventent toujours avoir raison (Paris: José Corti) 210.
Pierson, John (1996), Spike, Mike, Slackers, and Dykes: A guided Tour across a decade of Independant American Cinema (London: Faber).
Pinto, Meital (2007 ), ‘On the Intrinsic Value of Arabic in Israel – Challenging Kymlicka on Language Rights’,
Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence,, 20 (1).
— (2009), ‘Who is afraid of language rights in Israel’, in Ovad Nachtomy and Avi Sagi (eds.), The Multicultural Challenge in Israel (Boston: Academic Studies Press), 26-51.
Pisani, Edgar (1996), ‘La Crainte de la Mondialisation: affronter la déréglemenation économique.’ Le Monde Diplomatique, (janvier 1996).
Platt, Bill (1992), ‘The Confusing State of Minority Language Rights’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A Sourcebook on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press), 229-35.
Platt, Polly (1998), French or Foe (2nd edn.; Cincinnati, Ohio: C.J. Krehbiel Company) 272.
Ploquin, Françoise (2005), ‘Esprit de Famille’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (Janvier 2005), 23.
Pons, Xavier (1994), Stamp Duty (Cambridge: British Australian Studies Association) 36-45.
— (1994), A sheltered land (St. Leonards: Allen & Unwin) 350.
— (1996), Le Multiculturalisme en Australie: Au-delà de Babel (Paris et Montréal: L’Harmattan (INC)) 413.
— (1997), ‘A word from the EASA President’, The European Association for Studies on Australia Newsletter, (16), 2.
— (2000), L’Australie: Entre Occident et Orient (Paris: La Documentation Française) 133.
Poplack, Shana and Tagiamonte, Sali (1994), ‘Marking the plural in the African American diaspora’, American Speech, (69), 227-59.
Poplak, Shana and Tagliamonte, Sali (1991), ‘African American English in the diaspora: Evidence from old-lkine Nova Scotians’, Language Variation and Change, (3), 301-39.
— (1991), ‘There’s no tense like the present: Verbal -s inflection in early Black English’, in Guy Bailey, Nathalie Maynor, and Patricia Cukor-Avila (eds.), The emergence of Black English in the diaspora: Text and Commentary (Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins), 275-324.
— (1991), ‘African American English in the diaspora: Evidence from old-line Nova Scotians’, Language Variation and Change, (3), 301-39.
Portes, Alejandro and Rumbaut, Rubén (1990), Immigrant America (Berkeley: University of California) 202-04.
Portes, Jacques (1994), Le Canada et le Québec au XXème siècle (Histoire Contemporaine; Paris: Armand Colin) 196.
Post, Robert and Rogin, Michael (eds.) (1998), Race and Representation: Affirmative Action (New York: Zone Books) 424.
Post, Washington (2002), ‘Islam’s death wish’, International Heral Tribune (Washington Post), 05.04.2002, p. 6.
Poutignat, Philippe and Streiff-Fenart, Jocelyne (1995), Théories de l’ethnicité (1ère edn., Le sociologue, 1; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France) 270.
Power, Carla (2005), ‘Not the Queen’s English: Non-native English-speakers now outnumber native ones 3 to 1. And it’s changing the way we communicate’, Newsweek, CXLV (10), 46-59.
Preston, Travis, et al. (2012), ‘Interdependence of the Movies and on the Stage’, paper given at 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence, Los Angeles, September 8th, 2012.
Prevost-Paradol (1868), La France Nouvelle (4th edn.; Paris: Michel Lévy Frères) 423.
Primor, Adar (2012), ‘Israel, a red spot in a word of Democratic Blue’, Haaretz, 8 november 2012.
Prott, Lyndel V. (1988), ‘Cultural Rights as People’s Rights in International Law’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 93-106.
Pucket, Newbell Niles (1975), Black Names in America (Boston: G.K. Hall).
Puppo, Alberto (2002), ‘Les langues entre traditions et droit: de la traduction radicale au verbalisme interculturel’, Droit et Cultures, 344, 21-31.
Pütz, Martin (ed.), (1997), Language Choices.
Puyalte, Francis (2001), ‘Tsiganes: Une délinquance qui désarme l’Etat’, Le Figaro, 10 septembre 2001, p. 1 & 12.
Québec, Gouvernement du (1996), ‘Un Québec de responsabilité et de solidarité’, (Québec), 50.
Quermonne, L.-J. (1994), Le système politique de l’Union Européenne (Paris: Montchrestien).
Radzivill, Catherine (1921), ‘Testimony against the Protocole des Sages de Sion’, American Hebrew, 15 (21 février).
Ramadan, Tariq (2009), ‘Keynote address’, Interdependence Day: Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
— (2012), ‘Waiting for an Arab Spring of Ideas’, International Herald Tribune, October 1st, 2012.
Ramonet, Ignacio (1996), ‘Québec et Mondialisation’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (505), 32.
— (1997), ‘L’empire américain’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (515), 1.
— (1999), ‘La cause des femmes’, Manière de voir (Le Monde Diplomatique), FEMMES, LE MAUVAIS GENRE ? (44 , mars-avril 1999).
— (1999), ‘L’An 2000’, Le Monde Diplomatique, (Decembre 99).
Raspberry, William (1997), ‘Innovating Isn’t Educating’, The Washington Post, Jan. 31, 1997.
Rawick, George P. (ed.), (1977), The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography 10 vols. (10; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press).
Rawls, John (1971), A theory of justice (London: Oxford University Press).
Raynaud, Philippe (1995), ‘Le spectre du multiculturalisme américain: l’anticipation américaine’, Esprit, (Juin 1991), 88-89.
Raz, Joseph (1994), ‘Multiculturalism: a liberal perspective. ‘ Dissent, (Winter ), 67-79.
Reclus, Elie (1885), Les Primitifs. Etudes d’ethnologie comparée (Paris).
— (1894), Le Primitif d’Australie ou les Non-Non et les Oui-Oui. Etude d’ethnologie comparée (Paris: E. Dentu).
— (2010), L’Aborigène se meurt (Paris: Librairie La Brêche).
Redonnet, Jean-Claude (1994), L’Australie (Que-Sais-Je?; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France).
Reese, Renford (1997), ‘Ebonics can provide a lift to students’, Daily Bulletin, March 9, 1997.
Reese, Renfortd (1998), ‘From the Fringe: the Hip Hop Culture and Ethnic Relations’, Far West and Popular Culture Conference.
Reese, Renford (1999), ‘The socio-political context of the integration of sport in America’, Journal of African American Men, 4 (3, Spring).
Ebonics: some illustrations (2000) (tape).
— (2005), ‘Noble principle, Ignoble practices: Race and the US Criminal Justice System’, in Renford Reese (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Ethnic Minorities and the Criminal Justic System (Stockholm, Norra Latin, room 459: California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, US).
— (2010), Hong Kong Nights (Daily Bulletin; Atlanta: Darby Printing) 226.
Reese, Renford (2010), ‘Politics of Hate Undermine Our Democracy’, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/San Bernardino Sun (CA), July 23.
Reese, Renford (2011), ‘The Deficit, Taxes, and Politics’, The San Bernardino Sun (CA), August 18.
— (2011), ‘Obama and The Republican Identity Crisis’, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin (Ontario, CA), May 27.
— (2012), ‘Les manifestations linguistiques de l’oppression: l’expérience des Afro-Américains’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 171-90.
— (2012), ‘GOP Extremism Killed Romney’s Chances’, Los Angeles Daily News.
— (2012), ‘ What if Obama had Romney’s Profile?’ San Bernardino County Sun and Inland Valley Bulletin (CA), September 18.
— (2012), ‘How the London Olympics will help Obama get Re-elected’, Inland Valley Bulletin/San Bernardino Sun (CA).
— (2012 ), ‘King Would Be Disappointed in U.S.’ San Bernardino Sun (CA), January 13,, sec. Opinion, A15.
— ( 2010), ‘Obama’s Masterful Chess Game’, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/San Bernardino County Sun (CA), December 26, sec. Opinion, A15.
Reid, Mark A (1993), Redefining Black Film (Berkeley: University of California).
Reitz, Jeffrey and Breton, Raymond (1994), The illusion of difference: realities of ethnicity in Canada and the United States (Ottawa: C.D. Howe Institute).
release (2000), ‘Globe-Hopping Workers’, Trend Newsletter, 19 (23), 8.
— (2000), ‘Emigrés Go Home’, Trend Newsletter, 19 (23), 3.
Renan, Ernest (1878), ‘langue et nation’.
Renault, Emmanuel (2004), ‘L’enjeu politique de l’identité’, L’identité (French edn., Les Mots du Monde; Paris: Editions La Decouverte), 113-35.
Renaut, Alain (1999), Libéralisme politique et pluralisme culturel (Paris: Pleins Feux).
Reporter (1982), ‘Judge rejects suit for translation’, New York Times, 24 oct., p. 49.
— (1982), ‘Judge Rejects suits for Translation’, New York Times, 24 oct., p. 49.
— (1986), ‘Prop. 63 Deserves Approval’, San Francisco Examiner, 26 octobre.
— (1988), ‘Vote No on Bigotry’, Tempe Daily News Tribune, October 22.
— (1989), ‘Say it In English’, Newsweek, (Feb. 20,), 22.
— (1995), ‘One Nation, One Language” “Would making English the nation’s official language unite the country or divide it”‘, US News and World Report, 38-48.
Research, Bureau of Immigration and Population (1990.), ‘Australian Immigration: A Survey of the Issues’, (Canberra: Bureau of Immigration and Population Research).
Resnick, P. (1994), Thinking English Canada (Toronto: Stodart).
Resnick, Philip (1994), ‘Toward a Multinational Federalism: Asymmetrical and Confederal Alternatives’, in F.L. Seidle (ed.), A la Recherche d’un nouveau Contrat politique pour le Canada: Options asymétriques et options confédérales (Québec: Institute for Research on Public Policy), 71-91.
Rhines, Jesse Algeron (1996), Black Film/White Money (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press).
Rich, Roland (1988), ‘The Right to Development: A Right of Peoples’, in James Crawford (ed.), The Rights of Peoples (Oxford: Clarendon Press), 39-54.
RICHTER, Ingo (2012), ‘Language rights revisited: the challenge of Global Migration and Communication’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Rickard, J. (1988), Australia, A Cultural History (London/New York: Longman).
Rickford, John R. and Rickford, A. (1995), ‘Dialect Readers Revisited’, Linguistics in Education, (7), 107-28.
Rickford, John R. and McWhorter, John (1997), ‘Language Contact and Language Generation: Pidgins and Creoles’, in Florian Coulmas (ed.), The Handbook of Sociolinguistics (Oxford: Blackwell), 238-56.
Rickford, John R. (1998), ‘The Creole Origins of African-American Vernacular English: Evidence from Copula Absence.’ in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Rootledge), 154-200.
— (1998), ‘The Ebonics controversy in my backyard: A sociolinguist’s experiences and reflections’, Language in Society.
Rishika (2009), ‘Youth summit of IDDay’, Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
Robert, Arnaud (2002), ‘Des Griots, des Marabouts et une histoire millénaire’, Un seul Monde (Le magazine de la DDC sur le développement et la coopération, (4), 16.
Robespierre (de), Claire (1996), ‘La renaissance du Mythe d’ANZAC dans l’Australie Contemporaine’, (Sorbonne).
Robillard (de), Didier and Beniamino, Michel (eds.) (1993), Le Français dans l’Espace Francophone: Description linguistique et sociolinguistique de la francophonie. 2 vols. (1ère edn., 1; Paris: Honoré Champion) 534.
Rodby, Judith (1992), ‘A Polyphony of Voices: The Dialectics of Linguistic Diversity and Unity in the Tewntieth-Century United States’, in T.W. Machan and Scott Ch.T. (eds.), English in its Social Contexts: Essays in Historical Sociolinguistics (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 178-203.
Rodger, J. (2003 ), ‘Social Solidarity, Welfare and Post-emotionalism’, Journal of Social Policy (32), 403-21. .
Rollin, Roger (ed.), (1989), The Americanization of the Global Village: Essays in Comparative popular Culture (Bowling Green: Bowling Green State University Popular Press) 154.
Romaine, Suzanne (1991), Language in Australia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
— (1994), Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Romy-Masliah, Daphné (1986), ‘Majorités et Minorités Officielles: Politique Linguistique au Canada’, in Jean-Claude Lacroix (ed.), Colloque international de l’Association Française d’Etudes Canadiennes (A.F.E.C.) (2; Bordeaux: Revue Interdisciplinaire des Etudes Canadiennes en France).
Romy-Masliah, Daphné and Ricq, Charles (1994), Manuel de Coopération Transfrontalière à l’Usage des Collectivités Locales et Régionales en Europe (3 edn.; Strasbourg: Conseil de l’Europe) 168.
Romy-Masliah, Daphné (1994), ‘Plurilinguisme et Multiculturalisme en Europe: La Belgique, l’Espagne et la France (Etude comparative)’, Mémoire de maitrise (Université de Genève).
— (1995), ‘La Mobilité des Enseignants’, Le Nouveau Quotidien, 15 juin 1995, p. 32.
— (1998), ‘L’Anglais et les Cultures: Analyse Sociolinguistique des Situations Plurilingues et Multiculturelles au Canada, en Australie et aux Etats-Unis’, Doctorat (Université de Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV)).
Romy-Masliah, Daphné L. (1998), ‘Médias Australiens et Multiculturalisme: l’ABC de la politique de la diversité culturelle Australienne’, in Yves Laberge (ed.), 14th World Congress of Sociology (Special Session edn., Sociology and the Media; Montreal: International Sociological Association), 327.
Romy-Masliah, Daphné (1998), ‘Plurilinguisme et multiculturalisme: les points de vue australiens et canadiens à travers ceux de leurs Premiers Ministres.’ in Patrice Brasseur (ed.), Colloque international de l’Association Française d’Etudes Canadiennes (A.F.E.C.) (Avignon: Revue Interdisciplinaire des Etudes Canadiennes en France).
— (1998), ‘Summary of Ph.D. Dissertation’, Crossings, 3 (2).
— (1999), ‘Ebonics: a language, a sub-cultural dialect or a culture’, AILA99 Conference (Tokyo).
— (1999), ‘Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Australia: the case of Melbourne’, in Kjell Herberts and Joseph G. Turi (eds.), Multilingual Cities and Language Policies (Vaasa: Abo Akademi University, Social Science Research Unit), 171-94.
Romy-Masliah, Daphné L. (1999), ‘Multiculturalisme Contemporain: les diaspora grecques en Australie’, in Lykion Ton Hellinidon (ed.), Keynote Speech (Geneva).
Romy-Masliah, Daphne (1999), ‘From socialisation to communication times: a client’s side of the story’, ICCA Workshop (Vancouver).
Romy-Masliah, Daphné L. (1999), ‘The Greek Diaspora of Montreal and Melbourne: An exploration into new immigration patterns.’ in Xavier Pons (ed.), Fifth Conference of the EASA (Toulouse: L’Harmattan).
— (1999), ‘Politiques linguistiques et culturelles au Canada, en Australie et aux Etats-Unis’, in Hervé Guillorel Geneviève Koubi (ed.), Langues et Droits (Bruxelles: Bruylant).
Romy-Masliah, Daphné (1999), ‘Politiques linguistiques et Culturelles au Canada, en Australie et aux Etats-Unis: entre législation et jurisprudence’, in Hervé Guillorel and Geneviève Kouby (eds.), Langues et Droit: Langues du droit, droit des langues (Bruxelles: Bruylant), 143-86.
— (1999), ‘Multiculturalism and the Media: some diverging perspectives’, ISS International Conference, 1999.
— (1999), ‘Multiculturalism in Melbourne’, in Maryvonne Nedejkowics (ed.), Conférence sur L’Asie Pacifique (Le Havre).
— (1999), ‘Politiques linguistiques et Culturelles au Canada, en Australie et aux Etats-Unis: entre législation et jurisprudence’, in Hervé Guillorel and Geneviève Kouby (eds.), Langues et Droit: Langues du droit, droit des langues (Bruxelles: Bruylant), 143-86.
Romy-Masliah, Daphné L. (2000), ‘Politiques linguistiques et culturelles au Canada, en Australie et aux Etats-Unis’, in Hervé Guillorel Geneviève Koubi (ed.), Langues et Droits (Bruxelles: Bruylant).
Romy-Masliah, Daphné (2000), L’Anglais et les Cultures: Analyse Sociolinguistique des Situations Plurilingues et Multiculturelles au Canada, en Australie et aux Etats-Unis (Lille: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion) 700.
— (2002), ‘Les terminologies du multiculturalisme’, Droit et Culture, (44), 73-84.
— (2002), ‘The Ebonics Controversy: an unsolved dilemma and a challenge for multicultural america’, in Kjell Herberts (ed.), (San Juan, Puerto Rico: Libreria-Editorial-Ateneo Puertorriqueno), 379-402.
— (2004), ‘English and Cultures: Crossroad or frontier?’ Congrès de l’Institut International de Sociologie (Stockholm).
— (2005), ‘English and Cultures: Crossroad or frontier?’ in Brohy Claudine (ed.), L3 Conference (Fribourg and Neuchâtel).
Romy-Masliah, D. & S. Abid-Houcine (2010), ‘Indigenous Languages: a revival or a survival? ‘ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
— (2010), ‘Teaching English in Geneva and Sidi Bel Abbès, A baroque Assessment.’ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Romy-Masliah, Daphné (2011), ‘Languages in the Maghreb and in the Arab World in the light of the 2011 Spring Revolution’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
— (2011), ‘Contemporary Minorities and Indigenous Languages issues : how do they differ and /or relate?’ paper given at World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education, Cusco, Peru, 14-18 august 2011.
Romy-Masliah, Daphné and Koubi, Geneviève (eds.) (2012), S’entendre sur la langue (Droit et Cultures, 63; Paris: L’Harmattan) 200.
— (2012), ‘Présentation’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 11-22.
rOMy-Masliah, D. (2012), ‘Tamahaq, a Vulnerable Indigenous Language in the City’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Roosevelt, Theodore (1917), ‘The Chidren of the Crucible: One Flag, One Language’, Wartime appeal.
Rosen, BAARBARA (1994), ‘Is English Really a Family of Languages?’ International Herald Tribune, 15 octobre.
Roseneau, James (1997), Along the Domestic-Foreign Frontier, Exploring Governance in a Troubled World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Rosove, John (2012), ‘Plenary Session on the Future of Pro-Israel: Address’.
Rothstein, R (1993), ‘The Myth of Public School Failure’, The American Prospect, 13 (Spring).
Rouart, Jean-Marie (1999), ‘Décolonisation’, Le Figaro Littéraire, 12 aout, p. 15.
Rougé, R. (ed.), (1986), Les Immigrations européennes aux Etats-Un is, 1880-1910 (Paris: Presses Universitaires de Paris-Sorbonne).
Roussel, Eric (2007), Pierre Mendès France (Gallimard).
Rousselle, Serge (2012), ‘Justification et moyens de mise en oeuvre des droits linguistiques des minorités dans une démocratie libérale: perspective candaienne’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Rousso, Henry (2011), ‘Il faut qu’une porte soit ouverte’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 91-96.
Rowley, Chris and Lewis, Mark (1997), ‘Introduction: Greater China at the Crossroads: Convergence, Culture and Competitiveness’, Asia Pacific Business Review, ( 2.3, Special Issue – Greater China: Political Economy, Inward Investment and Business Culture).
Rubin, J., et al. (eds.) (1977), Language Planning Processes (The Hague: Mouton).
Ruf, Isabelle (2000), ‘Allié des nationalismes, le “génie des langues” joue un rôle ambigu: les langues organisent chacune le monde à lsuer naière propre et peuvent tout dire en dépit des discours nationalistes qui les récupèret’, LeTemps, Samedi 5 aout 2000, p. 7.
Ruiz, R. (1994), ‘Language policy and planning in the US’, in Grabe W. et al. (ed.), Annual Revew of Applied Linguistics (New York: Cambridge University Press), 111-25.
Rupesinghe, Kumar and Tishkov, Valery A. (eds.) (1997), Ethnicity and power in the Contemporary world (Tokyo-New York-Paris: United Nations University Press) 298.
Rushdie, Salman (1993), Patries imaginaires, trans. A. Chatelin (Paris: Bourgois).
Ruttenberg, Roee ‘A reminder to Israel from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’ accessed Sunday, January 15 2012|.
Saez, Jean-Pierre (ed.), (1995), Identités, Cultures et Territoires (Paris: Desclée de Brouwer) 267.
Safire, William (2000), ‘Counts and Recounts: Taking Democracy Seriously’, New York Times and International Herald Tribune, November 10, 2000, p. 8.
Safran, Margaret (1998), ‘comment on Jewish Aussies’ Home page’, ( Mon, 8 Jun 1998).
Salem, Wardia (2000), ‘L’envol du Faucon’, Télérama, (2649), 7-8.
Sapiro, Gisèle (ed.), (2008), L’espace intellectuel en Europe. De la formation des Etats-nations à la mondialisation XIXè-XXIè siècles, Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation ( La Découverte, Paris: CNRS Editions).
Sasaki, Masamichi (2005), ‘Migration and Citizenship’, 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference (Stockholm, Norra Latin, Aula 3d Floor).
Sassen, Saskia (2000), ‘Le travail Mondialisé: Mais pourquoi émigrent-ils?’ Le Monde Diplomatique, (560), 4-5.
SAU (2000), The dictionary of Dangerous Words (London: Social Affairs Unit).
Saubaber, Delphine (2004), ‘L’Express’, L’Express, 06/12/2004.
Sawchuk, Joe (ed.), (1992), Identities and state structures (Brandon: Bearpaw).
Sayet, Rachel (2011), ‘Devils and Giants in Southern New England: the Appropriation of Native Sites by the English Colonists’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE).
Schieffelin, Bambi B., Woolard, Kathryn A., and Koskrity, Paul V. (eds.) (1998), Language Ideologies: Practice and Theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 338.
Schiffman, Harold F. (1998), Linguistic Culture and Language Policy, eds Crowley Tony and Talbot J. Taylor (2nd edn., The Politics of Language; London and N.Y.: Routledge) 351.
Schlesinger Jr, Arthur M. (1993), La désunion de l’Amérique (Paris: Liana levi) 165.
Schlossman, S.L. (1983), ‘Is there an American tradition of bilingual education? German in the public elementary schools, 1840-1919’, American Journal of Education, (91), 139-86.
Schneider, Edgar W. (1982), ‘On the history of Black English in the USA: Some new evidence”‘, English World Wide, (3), 18-46.
— (1993), ‘Africanisms in the Grammar of Afro-American English: Weighing the evidence”‘, in Saliko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), Africanisms in Afro-American Language Varieties (Athens: University of Georgia Press), 192-208.
Schneider, A. and Ingram, H. (1993), ‘Social Construction of target populations’, American Political Science Review, (87), 334-46.
Schramm, Danielle (2000), ‘Bassins méditerranéens’, Télérama, (2659), 20.
Schulte-Tenckhoff, Isabelle (1997), La question des peuples autochtones (Paris: Librairie Générale de Droit et de Jurisprudence) 235.
— (2000), ‘Le Droit et les Minorités’, in Alain Fenet, Geneviève Koubi, and Isabelle Schulte-Tenckhoff (eds.), Le Droit et les Minorités: analyses et textes (2ème edn., Organisatiion Internationale et Relations internationales; Bruxelles: Bruylant), 661.
Schweitzer, Pierre ‘LES PIEDS-NOIRS DÉBARQUENT À MARSEILLE EN 1962 : « IL FAUT LES REJETER À LA MER ! »’, <http://www.newsofmarseille.com/les-pieds-noirs-debarquent-a-marseille-en-1962-il-faut-les-rejeter-a-la-mer/&gt;.
Seaman (1984), ‘Aboriginal Land Inquiriy’, (Perth: Western Australia Government).
Sebok, Antony J. (1998), Legal Positivism in American Jurisprudence, ed. Gerald Postema (Cambridge Studies in Philophy and Law; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) 327.
Seidle, F.L. (ed.), (1994), A la Recherche d’un nouveau Contrat politique pour le Canada: Options asymétriques et options confédérales (Québec: Institute for Research on Public Policy).
Seidlhofer, Barbara (2002), ‘Autour du concept d’anglais international: de l'”anglais authentique” à l'”anglais réaliste”?’ (Strasbourg: Conseil de l’Europe, Division des politiques linguistiques, DG IV- Direction de l’Education scolaire, extrascolaire et de l’enseignement supérieur).
Senghaas, Dieter (1993), ‘Les conflits ethniques ou le retour des nationalismes’, in Union de l’Europe Occidentale (ed.), Guerre et paix: la prévention des conflits en Europe (Paris: Institut d’Etudes de sécurité).
Shafak, Elif (2002), Bonbon Palace (Bit Palas) (Paris: Editions Phébus) 367.
— (2007), The Bastard of Istanbul (London, New York: Penguin Books) 360.
Shaffir, Stav (2012), ‘The Israeli Social Protest Movement’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Shafir, Stav (2012), ‘Israeli Activist and Organizer,Tents’ Protest Movement Rothchild Square in Tel Aviv’, J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Sharp, Andrew (1990), Justice and the Maori: Maori claims in New Zealand political argument in the 1980s (Auckland: Oxford University Press).
Sheizaf, Noam ‘Court okays Citizenship Law, legalizing discrimination of Arabs
‘, [blog], (updated Thursday, January 12 ) <http://972mag.com/high-court-okays-citizenship-law-legalizing-racial-discrimination-of-arabs/32802/&gt;, accessed 15 janvier 2012.
Shickel, Richard (1984), D.W. Griffith: An American Life (New York: Simon and Schuster).
Shirley, Graham (1994), ‘Australian cinema: 1896 to the renaissance’, in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin), 5-44.
Shlesinger, M. (2010), ‘Interpreting as Human Rights: sign-language interpreting as a case in point ‘, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Shu, Jing, et al. (1993), ‘Australia’s Population, Trends and Prospects 1993’, (Canberra: Bureau of Immigration and Population Research).
Shuy, Roger (ed.), (1964), Social Dialects and Language Learning (Champaign, Illinois: National Council of Teachers of English).
Shuy, Roger, Wolfram, Walter, and Riley, William K. (1967), ‘a Study of social dialects in Detroit’, (Washington, D.C.: Office of Education).
Sigaud, Paul (1997), ‘Dans les écoles de Brooklyn, les professeurs font face au défi quotidien du multiculturalisme’, Journal de Genève et Gazette de Lausanne, 1er-2 novembre, p. 7.
Silverstein, Michael (2003 ), ‘Indexical order and the dialectics of sociolinguistic life’, Language and Communication 3-4 (23), 193-229.
Simon, Bernard (1996), ‘Ottawa protège sa culture: le protectionisme canadien agace les américains’, Financial Times, repris par Courrier International, 29 février 1996, p. 17-18.
Simpson, Richard (1689), Voyage to the Straits of Magellan & S.Seas.
Singh, K.S (1993), Peoples of India (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
Singler, John V. (1989), ‘Plural marking in Liberian Settler English, 1829-1980’, American Speech, (64), 40-64.
Sinoué, Gilbert (2010), Inch’Allah1, Le Souffle du Jasmin, 2 vols. (1; Paris: Flammarion) 478.
Sitbon
Toledano ‘deux juifs tunes assassins et guillotinés’.
Skali, Faouzi (2009), ‘Women, Islam and Development’, in Benjamin Barber (ed.), Interdependence Day: Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence (Istanbul).
Sklar, Robert (1994), Movie-Made America (2nd edition, revised and updated edn., Vintage Books; New York: Random House).
Skrentny (1996), The Ironies of Affirmative Action (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove. (1988), ‘Multilingualism and the education of minority children’, in T. Skutnabb-Kangas and J. Cummings (ed.), Minority education: from shame to struggle (Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd).
Skuttnab-Kangas, Tove and Phillipson, Robert (eds.) (1994), Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination, ed. Joshua Fishman 1 vols. (Contributions to the Sociology of Language, 1; Berlin-New York: Berlin-New York) 453.
Skuttnab-Kangas, Tove (1994), ‘Linguistic Human rights, past and present’, in Tove Skuttnab-Kangas and Robert Phillipson (eds.), Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination (Berlin-New York: Mouton de Gruyter), 71-105.
Slama, Alain-Gérard (2003), ‘Quelle culture veut-on défendre?’ Le Figaro, 17 novembre 2003, p. 15.
Slawson, John and Marc, Vosk (1979), Unequal Americans: Practices and Politics of Intergroup Relations (Westport: Greenwood).
Sliema, Aldo (2010), ‘Malta Family history’.
Smith, A. (1980), The Geopolitics of Information (London: Faber and Faber).
Smith, A.D. (1981), The Ethnic Revival in the Modern World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Smith, Anthony (1986), The ethnic origins of nations (Oxford: Blackwell).
Smith, Anthony. (1986), ‘A Europe of nations – or the nation of Europe’, Journal of Peace Research, 30 (2), 129-35.
Smith, Allan (1994), Canada, An American Nation? Essays on Continentalism, Identity and the Canadian Frame of Mind (Montreal &Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press) 398.
Smitherman, Geneva (1998), ‘Word from the Hood: the lexicon of African-American Vernacular English’, in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Routledge), 203-25.
— (2000), Talking that Talk: Language, culture and education in African America (London: Routledge) 457.
Smolar, Piotr (2004), ‘Les RG s’alarment d’un “repli communautaire” dans les banlieues’, Le Monde, mardi 6 juillet 2004, p. 6.
Smolicz, J.J. (1991), ‘Language Core Values in a Multicultural Setting’, International Review of Education, 1 (37), 35-52.
Social Security, Department of (1998), ‘New Ambitions for Our Country:A New Contract for Welfare, Green Paper on Welfare Reform’, in London: HMSO. Cm 3805 (ed.), (Department of Social Security).
Sohn, L. (1981), ‘The rights of minorities’, in L. Henkin (ed.), The international bill of rights: the covenant on civil and political rights (New York: Columbia University Press).
Solis Fonseca, Gustavo (2011), ‘Culturally Specific Epistemologies’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People, Cusco, Peru, 16 aug 2011.
Sollers, Philippe (1999), ‘La guerre et les mots’, Le Monde, 14 avril 1999, p. 1.
Somers, M. (2008 ), Genealogies of Citizenship (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Soysal, Y. (1994 ), Limits of Citizenship (Chicago: University of Chicago Press.).
Soysal, Y. ( 2012), ‘Citizenship, immigration and the European social project: rights and obligations of individuality’, British Journal of Sociology, ( 63), 1-21.
Spears, Arthur K. (1998), ‘African-American language use: ideology and so-called obscenity’, in Slikoko S. Mufwene, et al. (eds.), African-American English: Structure, History and Use (London: Routledge), 226-50.
Spears, Arther K. (ed.), (1999), Race and Ideology: Language, Symbolism, and Popular Culture (Detroit: Wayne State University Press) 242.
Spears, Arthur K. (1999), ‘Teaching “Minorities” about language and culture’, in Arthur K. Spears (ed.), Race and Ideology: Language, Symbolism, and Popular Culture (Detroit: Wayne State University Press), 61-82.
Special, Joint Committee on a Renewed Canada (1992), ‘Report of the Special Joint Committee on a Renewed Canada’, (Ottawa: Supply and Services).
Spiegelman, Art (2003), Bons baisers de New York (Paris Flammarion) 112 pages.
Spinner, Jeff (1994), The Boundaries of Citizenship: Race, Ethnicity and Nationality in the Liberal State (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press).
Spolsky, Bernard and Hallel, Michael (1994), ‘The teaching of additional languages in Israel’, Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, (13), 37-49. .
Spolsky, Bernard (1994), ‘Policy Issues In Testing And Evaluation’, The Annals of The American Academy of Political and Social Science, 532 (March), 226-37.
— (1994), ‘Conditions for second language learning in Israel ‘, English Teacher’s Journal., 47 (May), 45-54. .
— (1994), ‘The situation of Arabic in Israel’, in Y. Suleiman (ed.), Arabic Sociolinguistics: Issues and Perspectives (Richmond: Curzon Press), 227-36.
— (1994), ‘Israel: Language situation’, in R. E. Asher (ed.), The Encyclopedia of language and linguistics. (Oxford: Pergamon Press).
Spolsky, Bernard and Amara, Muhammad (1995), ‘The construction of identity in a divided Palestinian village: sociolinguistic evidence. ‘ paper given at conference on Language and Identity in the Middle East, Edinburgh University.
Spolsky, Bernard (1995), ‘ Hebrew and Israeli Identity.’ in Yasir Suleiman (ed.), Language and Identity in the Middle East and North Africa ( Richmond, Surrey: :Curzon).
— (1995), ‘Conditions for Language Revitalization: A comparison of the cases of Hebrew and Maori. Paper presented at a Seminar organized by the Center for the Study of Language and Society, Aston University’, Current Issues in Language and Society. .
Spolsky, Bernard, Norbert, Dittmar, and Walters, Joel (1996), ‘Grammaticalization and social convergence in second language acquisition’, Festschrift for Jacek Fisiak. .
Spolsky, Bernard (1996), ‘Prologomena to an Israeli Language Policy ‘, in Tina Hickey and Jenny . Williams (eds.), Language, Education and Society in a Changing World (Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd), 46-53.
— (1996), ‘English in Israel after Independence’, in Alma Rubal-Lopez and Andrew W. Conrad Joshua A. Fishman (ed.), Post-Imperial English (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter).
Spolsky, Bernard and Hasan Amara, Muhammad (1996), ‘ Politics and language change: the sociolinguistic reflexes of the division of a Palestinian village’, in Stig Eliasson and Ernest Hakon Jahr (ed.), Einar Haugen Memorial Volume (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter).
Spolsky, Bernard (1996), ‘Multilingualism in Israel’, in William Grabe (ed.), Annual Review of Applied Linguistics ( 17; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Spolsky, Bernard and Shohamy, Elana (1996), ‘National profiles of languages in education: Israel: Language policy’, in T. Skutnabb-Kangas and J. Peter Dickson and Alastair Cummings (ed.), National Profiles of Language Education in 24 Countries (Slough: National Foundation for Educational Research).
— (1996), ‘Language in Israeli Society and Education ‘, The International Journal of the Sociology of Language.
— (1997), ‘Planning foreign language education: an Israeli perspective.’ in Kees de Bot and Theo Bongaerts (ed.), Studies in honour of Theo van Els. (Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing
Company).
Spolsky, Bernard (1999), Sociolinguistics (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
— (2012), ‘The language of Jewish worship in the City’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Staiger, Janet (1992), Interpreting Films: Studies in the Historical Reception of American Cinema (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press).
Steinmetz, Sol (ed.), (1996), Random House Compact Unabridged Dictionary.
Stephens, M. (2010), ‘Lost in translation? Speaking Mâori in the New Zealand Parliament and the Maori Language Act 1987’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Stewart, William A. (1967), ‘Sociolinguistic factors in the history of American Negro dialects’, Florida FL Reporter, p. 11.
— (1968), ‘A sociolinguistic typology for describing national multilingualism’, in Joshua Fisham (ed.), Readings in the Sociology of Language (La Haye: Mouton).
— (1968), ‘Continuity and change in American Negro dialects’, Florida Foreign Language Reporter, (6), 1.3 ff.
— (1970), ‘Towards a history of Negro dialect’, in Frederick Williams (ed.), Language and Poverty (Chicago: Markham).
Stith, Kate and Cabraanes, Jose A. (1998), Fear of Judging: Sentencing Guidelines in the Federal Courts (Chicago: University of Chicago Press) 376.
Stoiciu, G. and O., Brosseau (1989), La Différence: Comment l’Ecrire? Comment la Vivre? Communication internationale et Communication interculturelle (Québec: Humanitas).
Strydom, H. (2010), ‘Keynote Address: Ideological and other obstacles in the way of a multi-lingual South African State.’ paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Sugunasiri, Suwanda (1991), ‘(about multiculturalism)’, Globe and Mail, 18 juillet.
Swain, S. (1991), ‘Manipulating and complementing content teaching to maximize second language learning’, TESL Canada Journal, 6, 68-83.
Swales, J. (1985), ‘English as the International language of research’, RELC Journal, (16.1.), 1-7.
— (1997), ‘English as the Tyrannosaurus rex.’ World Englishes, 16, 373-82.
Swepu, Chris ( 2012 ), ‘Languages Bill not worth the paper it’s written on’, The Star, February 21 2012 at 09:00am
Taguieff, Pierre-André (2003), ‘L’emprise du Néoprogressisme: renaissance de la “question sociale” ou émergence d’une nouvelle radicalité’, Le Figaro, mercredi 2 juillet 2003, p. 13.
Takaki, Ronald (ed.), (1994), From Different Shores: Perspectives On Race And Ethnicity In America (2nd edn., Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Taleb Ibrahimi, A. (1981), ‘De la décolonisation à la révolution culturelle (1962-1972)’, (SNED).
Talmon, L.J. (1952), ‘Two Varieties of Democracy: The Rise of Totalitarian Democracy.

— (1960), ‘Political Messianism
‘.
Tamir, Yael (1993), Liberal Nationalism (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
Taskforce, Language Policy (1978), ‘English and Colonialism in Puerto Rico’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), 63-71.
Taylor, Charles. (1991), ‘Shared and divergent values’, in Ronald Watts and D. Brown (ed.), Options for a new Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Taylor, Charles (1994), Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of recognition, ed. Amy Gutman (2nd expanded edition edn.; Princeton: Princeton University Press) 175.
Temple Adger, Carolyn ‘Issues and Implications of English Dialects for Teaching English as a Second Language’, TESOL Professional Paper.
TESOL (1992), ‘Statement on the Role of Bilingual Education of Children in the United States’, (Alexandria, Virginia: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages).
Thomason, Sarah G. and Kaufman, Terrence (1988), Language Contact, Creolization, and Genetic LInguistics (Berkeley: University of California Press).
Thompson, E.P. (1968), The Making of the English Working Class (London: Penguin).
Thompson, Kristin (1985), Exporting Entertainment: American in the World Film Market 1907-1934 (London: British Film Institute).
Thompson, J.H. and S.J., Randall (1994), Canada and the United States, Ambivallent Allies (Montreal &Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press).
Thompson, Elisabeth (2000), ‘Quebec divisible: Indians,” Bill 99 ignores our right to self determination, First Nations tell National Assembly hearing”‘, The Gazette, Feb.9, 2000, p. A1, A12.
Thompson, Tim (2011), ‘Indigenous knowledge and Education for future generations.’ paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People.
Tobias, John L. (1976), ‘Protection, Civilisation, Assimilation: an outline of Canada’s Indian Policy’, Jouranl of Anthropology, 6 (2), 13-30.
Todorov, Tzvetan (1978), Symbolisme et Interprétation (Paris: Le Seuil).
— (1993), On human diversity: nationalism, racism and exoticism in French thought. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press).
— (1995), ‘Du culte de la différence à la sacralisation de la victime’, Esprit, (Juin 1991), 90-102.
Tollefson, James W. (ed.), (2012), Language Policies in Education
(2nd edn., Critical Issues: Routledge ) 316.
Tollefsson, J.W. (1991), Planning Language, Planning Inequality : Language Policy in the Community (London: Longman).
Tomasi, John. (1991), ‘ Individual rights and community virtues.’ Ethics’ 101 (3), 521-36.
Tomlinson, John (1991), Cultural Imperialism: a critical introduction (London: Pinter Publishers) 187.
Touraine, Alain (1990), ‘L’Hymne à la Nation: l’expression d’une angoisse identitaire’, Le Monde, 1990.
Traisnel, Christophe (2012), ‘Aménat’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Trasviña, Diego (1992), ‘Bilingual Ballots: Their History and a Look Forward’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A Sourcebook on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press), 258-64.
Traube, Elisabeth (1992), Dreaming Identities: Class, Gender and Generation in 1980s Hollywood Movies (Boulder: Westvew Press).
Truchot, Claude (ed.), (1994), Le Plurilinguisme Européen 1 vols. (1ère edn., 1; Paris: Honoré Champion) 423.
Trudeau, Pierre Elliott (1979), Federalism and the French Canadians (Toronto: Macmillan of Canada) 212.
Trudgill, Peter (1974), Sociolinguistics: An introduction to Language and Society (London: Penguin Books).
Trudgill, P. and Hannah J (1982), International English: A Guide to Varieties of Standard English (London: Edward Harnold).
Tucker, G.R. (1991), ‘Developing a language-competent American Society: the role of language planning’, in A.G. Reynolds (ed.), Bilingualism, Multiculturalism, and second language learning (Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum), 65-79.
— (1993), ‘Language learning for the 21st century: challenges of the North American Free Trade Agreement’, Canadian Modern Language Review, (50.1.), 165-72.
Tully, J (1995), Strange multiplicity: constitutionalism in an age of diversity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Tunstall, J. (1977), The Media are American (London: Constable).
Turi, Joseph-G. (1994), ‘Typology of language legislation’, in Tove Skuttnab-Kangas and Robert Phillipson (eds.), Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination (Contributions to the Sociology of Language, 1; Berlin-New York: Berlin-New York), 11:117.
Turner, Lorenzo Dow (1949), Africanisms in the Gullah Dialect (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).
Turner, Brian (2005), ‘Global Religion, Diaspora and the Future of Citizenship’, in Masamichi Sasaki (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Migration and Citizenship (Stockholm, Norra Latin, Aula 3d Floor: National University of Singapore).
Turner, B.S. ( 1993), ‘Outline of a Theory of Human Rights’, Sociology (27), 485-512.
Turpel, Mary Ellen. (1989-90), ‘Aboriginal peoples and the Canadian charter: interpretive monopolies, cultural differences’, Canadian Human Rights Yearbook, (6), 3-45.
Twain, Mark (1884), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (New York: Scholastinc Inc. Appel Paperbacks).
Tylor, E.B. (1871), Primitive Culture.
Uçarlar, Nesrin (2009), Between Majority Power and Minority Resistance: Kurdish Linguistic Rights in Turkey
(Lund University).
Underhill, W (2009), ‘The Melting of the Melting Pot?.’ Newsweek.
UNDP (2002), ‘The Arab Human Development Report 2002: Creating Opportunities for Future Generations.’ (New York: United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Arab States).
UNESCO (1982), ‘Final Report of World Conference on Cultural Policies’, World Conference on Cultural Policies (Mexico City), 8.
unsigned (1997), ‘(in line with editorial policy)’, The Economist, 4 january 1997.
Upfield, Arthur (1956,), The Battling Prophet, trans. Michèle Valencia (Bonaparte Holding Pty) 270.
US, Commission on Civil Rights (1972), ‘The Excluded Student: Educational Practices Affecting Mexican Americans in the Southwest’, in James Crawford (ed.), Language Loyalties: A Sourcebook on the Official English Controversy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press), 58-63.
Vallières, Thomas (2002), ‘Le retour du Tribalisme: La faillite des aspirations collectives a réhabilité le cultre du sol et du sang. L’exaltation ethnico-religieuse sert désormais de refuge autoprotecteur. (dossier)’, Marianne, (279), 42-43.
Valpy, Michael (1994), ‘A fear of losing the old Canada’, The Globe and Mail, 11 mars 1994.
Van Den Berghe, Pierre (1981), The ethnic phenomenon (New York:: Elsevier).
— (1981), ‘Protection of ethnic minorities: a critical appraisal’, in R. Wirsing (ed.), Protection of ethnic minorities: comparative perspectives (New York: Pergamon).
Van Dyke, Vernon (1977), ‘The individual, the state, and ethnic communities in political theory’, World Politics, 29 (3), 343-69.
Van Dyke, Vernon. (1982), ‘Collective entities and moral rights: problems in liberal-democratic thought.’ Journal of Politics, 44, 21-40.
Van Dyke, Vernon (1995), ‘The Individual, the State and Ethnic Communities in Political Theory’, in Will Kymlicka (ed.), The Rights of Minority Cultures (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 31-56.
Varia (2012), ‘Opening Ceremony Remarks’, in Surendra Pathak (ed.), Teacher Education for Peace and Harmony (New Delhi and Shardarsahar).
Vass, Winifred Kellersgerger (1979), The Bantu Speaking Heritage of the United States (Los Angeles: Center for Afro-American Studies, UCLA).
Veltman, Calvin (1995), ‘The rentention of minority languages in the United States’, (Washington D.C.: NCES-USDE).
Ventura-Mustienes, Gemma (2012), ‘Bleu, blanc, vert, ou l’indépendance algérienne contre la langue française’, in Fernand De Varennes (ed.), Droits Linguistiques, inclusion et la prévention des conflits ethniques (Chiang Mai).
Vesterbacka, S. (1991), ‘Ritualized Routines and L2 Acquisition: Acquisition Strategies in an Immersion Program.’ Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 12 (1&2), 35-43.
Viereck, Wolfganag (1988), ‘Invariant be in an unnoticed source of American Early Black English’, American Speech, (63), 291-301.
Vignuzzi, Y. (1983), ‘Le motivazioni allo studio della lingua italiana all’estero.’ L’italiano come lingua seconda in Italia e all’estero (Rome: Ministeri Affari Esteri e Pubblica Istrizione).
Villers, Sandrine (1996), ‘L’image de la société américaine dans le théâtre de Tennessee Williams’, (Sorbonne).
Waggoner, Dorothy (1981), ‘Statistics on language use’, Language in the USA (1; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 592.
Wagner, Peter (2005), ‘In time and Space: on the Possibility of a Cultural Theory of Modernity’, in Neil J. Smelser, University of California, Berkeley (ed.), 37th International Institute of Sociology Conference: Sociology and Cultural Sciences (Folket Hus, Kongresshallen A: European University Institute, Italy,).
Waho, Toni (2011)paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People, Peru.
— (2012), ‘Te Rei Māori – The Māori language- in the City’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Wald, P. and G., Manessy (1979), Plurilinguisme : Normes, situations, Stratégies ( Paris: L’Harmattan).
Waldron, Jeremy. (1992), ‘Minority cultures and the cosmopolitan alternative’, University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform, 25 (3), 751-93.
Walker, J.S.G. (1980), A History of Blacks in Canada (Ottawa: Ministry of State Multiculturalism).
Walker, Samuel (1998), The Rights Revolution: Rights and Community in Modern America (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 222.
Wallace-Crabbe, Chris (1991), ‘The Ethnic Red Herring’, in D. Goodman, D.J. O’Hearn, and C. Wallace-Crabbe (eds.), Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change (Melbourne: Scribe), 3-9.
Walzer, Michael (1997), On Toleration (New Haven: Yale University Press).
Wardhaugh, Ronald (1986), An Introduction to Sociolinguistics (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
— (1987), Languages in Competition: Dominance, Diversity and Decline (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
— (1993), Investigating Language: Central Problems in Linguistics (Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Wasala, Rohana (2011), ‘Mother Tongues and Multilingual Education’, The Island online, November 3 ( 7:46 pm )
sec. Lateral Commentaries.
Waugh, Thomas, ed (1984), Show Us Life: Towards a History and Aesthetics of the Committed Documentary (Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press).
Weaver, Sally. (1985), ‘Federal difficulties with aboriginal rights in Canada’, in M. Boldt and J. Long (ed.), The quest for justice: aboriginal peoples and aboriginal rights (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Weber, Raymond (1995), ‘De la réalité multiculturelle à la démarche interculturelle. Quels défis pour le Conseil de l’Europe ?’ in Jean-Pierre Saez (ed.), Identités, Cultures et Territoires (Paris: Desclée de Brouwer), 79-92.
Webster, Noah (1789, reimp.1967), Dissertations on the English Language: With Notes, Historical and Critical (Meniston: Meniston) pp. 18-23-35-36.
Weinreich, Uriel (1953), Languages in contact (La Haye: Mouton).
— (1966), ‘Explorations in Semantic Theory’, in Thomas A. Sebeok (ed.), Current trends in linguistics (La Haye: Mouton).
Weinstein, B (1983), The Civic Tongue, Political Consequences of Language Choices (New York & London: Longman).
Wenzel, George (1992), Animal Rights, Human Rights: Ecology, Economy and Ideology in the Canadian Arctic (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
West, Cornel (1990), ‘The new cultural politics of difference’, in R. Ferguson et al (ed.), Out there: marginalization and contemporary cultures. (Boston: MIT Press).
Whitlam, Edward Gaugh (1994), ‘Introduction’, in Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema (St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin), 1-4.
Wicherkiewicz, Tomasz (2012), ‘Revitalization through Documentation – the Case of Wilamowicean, a Micro-Minority Language in Southern Poland’, paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Wickberg, E (ed.), (1982), From China to Canada: A History of the Chinese Communities in Canada (Toronto: McClelland & Stewart&Multiculturalism Program, Department of the Secretary of State and the Canadian Government Publishing Center).
Widmann, Anne-Frédérique (1996), ‘La Californie met fin à la protection des minorités’, Le Nouveau Quotidien, 5 novembre 1996, p. 5.
Wievorka, Michel (2001), La Différence (Voix et Regards; Paris: Balland) 201.
Wievorka, Michel and Ohana, Jocelyne (eds.) (2001), La Différence Culturelle: Une reformulation des débats (Colloque de Cerisy) (Voix et Regards, Paris: Balland) 480.
Wiley, T.G. (1996), ‘Language Planning and Policy’, in S.L. McKay and N.H. Hornberger (eds.), Sociolinguistics and Lnaguage Teaching (New York: Cambridge University Press), 103-47.
WILFORD, JOHN NOBLE (2010), ‘Hunting One Language, Stumbling Upon Another’, New York Times, October 11, 2010.
Wilkerson, Isabel (1989), ‘Many who are Black favor new term for who they are’, New York Times, Dec.31, 1989, p. 1, 8.
Williams, Raymond (1961), Culture and Society (London: Penguin).
— (1965), The Long Revolution (London: Penguin).
Williams, Frederick (1970), ‘Language, attitude, and social change’, in Frederick Williams (ed.), Language and Poverty (Chicago: Markham).
Williams, Robert L. (1975), ‘Ebonics: the True Language of Black Folks’, (St Louis, Missouri: Institute of Black Studies).
Williams, G. (1992), Sociolinguistics: A Sociological Critique (London: , Routledge).
Williams, Melissa (1994), ‘Group inequality and the public culture of justice’, in Judith Baker (ed.), Group rights (Toronto: University of Toronto Press).
Williams, C. (2010), ‘Keynote: Language Commissioners: A comparative Perspective’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Williams, C. and O’Flatharta, P (2010), ‘The office of the language commissioner Ireland- Impact of the commission on the Irish language policy and official strategy’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Williams, Lisa (2012), ‘Cymraeg yn y Didnas – An old Language in a Modern City.’ paper given at Languages in the City, Berlin, 21-24 August, 2012.
Wilson, Robin W. (1976), The Blacks in Canada: A History (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University).
Wimmer, Adi (1997), ‘A note from your Conference Organizer’, European Association for Studies in Australia Newsletter, (16), 1.
Winant, Howard (1994), Racial Conditions (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press).
Winograd, Carol (2012), ‘Moving Women to the Fore and Advancing Peace.’ J Street: Making History (Washington D.C.).
Winstein, Brian (1983), The Civic Tongue (New York: Longman).
Winter, Greg (2000), ‘Coca-Cola Settles Racial Bias Lawsuit’, International Herald Tribune, 18-19 November.
Wire (1987), ‘Survey: Most Think English Is official U.S. Language’, Associated Press, 14 février.
— (2000), ‘La Cour d’appel de Paris accorde un interprète en basque à ”Kantauri”’, Associated Press, mercredi 20 septembre 2000, 18h29.
Wittgenstein, Ludwig (1940), Remarques mêlées (2002 edn.: GF Flammarion).
— (1984), Culture and Value trans. Peter Winch (University of Chicago Press) 195.
Woerhrling, J (2010), ‘La cour suprême du Canada et la réflexion sur la nature et les fondements des droits linguistiques’, paper given at “Language, Law and the Multilingual State” 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law Bloemfontein, 1-3 november 2010.
Wolfram, Walt (1969), A sociolinguistic description of Detroit Negro speech (Urban language series, 5; Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics).
Woo, Elaine and Mary, Curtius (1996), ‘California Educators Give Black English a Voice’, International Herald Tribune and Los Angeles Times, 21 december 1996.
Woodhouse, D. (1998), ‘‘The Judiciary in the 1990s’, Policy and Politics, (26:), 458-70.
Wren, Helen (1997), ‘Introduction’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), xxv-xxvii.
— (1997), ‘Making a Difference in Language Policy Agendas’, in William Eggington and Helen Wren (eds.), Language Policy: Dominant English, pluralist challenges (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company), 3-28.
Wright, Judith (1985), We Call For A Treaty (Sydney: Fontana).
Wright, Sue (1994), ‘The Contribution of Sociolinguistics’, Current Issues in Language and Society, 1 (1-6).
The Greek Media & Jounalists.
Wyld, H.C. (1939), A history of modern colloquial English (3d edn.; Oxford: Basil Blackwell).
Yacoub, Joseph (1995), Les Minorités: Quelle Protection?, 1 vols. (1ère edn., Habiter, 1; Paris: Desclée de Brouwer) 398.
Yataco, Miryam (2011), ‘Peruvian Indigenous Languages and the Spanish Supremacy’, paper given at World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE 2011).
— (2012), ‘Les politiques de l’Etat et l’exclusion des langues autochtones au Pérou’, Droit et Cultures, 63 (S’entendre sur la langue), 101-26.
Yearwood, Gladstone (ed.), (1982), Black Cinema Aesthetics (Athens,: Ohio University Press).
Yehoshua, Abraham B. (2011), ‘Juifs de la Diaspora, c’est votre droit d’agir’, in David Chemla (ed.), JCall: les raisons d’un appel (Paris: Liana Levi ), 117-24.
Yermeche, Ouerdia (2011), ‘Le français au contact de l’arabe et du berbère: le mixlangue dans les production langagières de jeunes Algériens’, paper given at Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 16-18 septembre 2011.
Young, Iris Marion. (1989), ‘Polity and group difference: a critique of the ideal of universal citizenship’, Ethics’ 99 (2), 250-74.
Young, Iris Marion (1990), Justice and the politics of difference (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press).
Young, Josh (1994), ‘New Line Cinema: it was a very good year’, The New York Times, 18 septembre 1994, p. H13, 20-21.
Yuval-Davis, Nira (1993), ‘Gender and nation’, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 16 (4), 621-32.
Zahidi, Mohamad (2012), ‘Universal Vision and Philosophical Framework’, in Surendra Pathak (ed.), Teacher Education for Peace and Harmony (New Delhi and Shardarsahar).
Zangwill, Israel (1908), The Melting Pot.
Zeitoun, Mazale (1979), ‘Le Judaïsme américain et sa position face à l’Etat d’Israel: Etude d’une minorité aux Etats-Unis et de son influence sur la politique extérieure américaine, 1948-1972’, (Paris 1).
Zellner, Wendy, Arnd, Michael, and Amy, Borrus (2000), ‘Etats-Unis cherchent immigrés désespérément: en phase de croissance, l’immigration amène un élan supplémentaire et protège l’économie des risques de surchauffe.’ Le Point Edition Affaires avec Business Week, (1440), x-xii.
Ziehl, Susan (2004), ‘globalization, migration and family pattern’, 36th World Congress International Institute of Sociology.
Zincone, Giovanna (1998), ‘Multiculturalism from Above: Italian Variations on a European Theme’, in Rainer Baübock and Rundell, John (eds.), Blurred Boundairies: Migration, Ethnicity, Citizenship (Vienna: Aldershot).
Zizek, Slavoj (1997), ‘Multiculturalism, or the cultural logic of multinational capitalism’, New Left Review, 225 (September-October ), 28-51.
Zuckermann, Ghil’ad (2012), ‘Sleeping beauties awake: Linguists and revivalists worldwide have much to learn from Hebrew’s remarkable, hybridic modern-day rebirth’, Times Higher Education, 19 January.

Links to my bibliography from A to Z:

A      B (this page)    C     D     E     F     G     H        I     J     K     L     

M     N     O     P       Q       R     S     T     U     V     W/X/Y/Z

Last update: April 6th, 2013
my notes: numbers correspond to my pages

Bader, Veit. (1995), ‘ Citizenship and exclusion: radical democracy, community and justice’, Political Theory, 2 (23), 211-46.

Baggioni, D., L.J. Calvet, R. Chaudenson, G. Manessy, and D de Robillard, Montmagny. 1992. Multilinguisme et développement dans l’espace francophone: Institut d’Etudes Créoles et Francophones et Didier Erudition.

Bailey, Guy, Nathalie Maynor, and Patricia Cukor-Avila, eds. 1991. The emergence of Black English : Text and Commentary, African-American English: Structure, History and Use. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

quoted by Rickford in Rickford, J. R. (1998). The Creole Origins of African-American Vernacular English: Evidence from Copula Absence. African-American English: Structure, History and Use. S. S. Mufwene, J. R. Rickford, G. Bailey and B. John. London, Rootledge: 154-200.

Bailey, Guy, and Erik Thomas. 1998. Some aspects of African American Vernacular English Phonology. In African-American English: Structure, History and Use, edited by S. S. Mufwene, J. R. Rickford, G. Bailey and B. John. London: Routledge.

Phonology is the neglected stepchild of research on AAVE…most distinctive features of AAVE, at least at first glance, are grammatical….disproprotionately high percentage of African American to specail education classes and to speech-language therapy (Wolfram 1994, Stockman, 1995.)
Final consonant cluster reduction
substitution of /d/ for / / initially (as in dese for these)…
AAVE Speakers pronouce the word with variously as (wit, wid, wif and wiv)

Bailyn, Bernard. 1967. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Cambridge, Massachusets: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Baker, Colin. 1993. Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

Baker, Geoff. 1994. Stepdad gets 2 years in sex assault. The Gazette, 15 janvier.

cité par Bissoondath, N. (1995). Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme. Montréal, Boréal, p. 103

Bakhtin, Michael. 1981. The dialogic imagination: Four Essays, edited by M. Holquist and C. Emerson. Austin: University of Texas Press.

quoted by Morgan, Marcyliena. 1998. More than an mood or an attitude: discourse and verbal genres in African-American Culture. In African-American English: Structure, History and Use, edited by S. S. Mufwene, J. R. Rickford, G. Bailey and B. John. London: Routledge.

Balibar, R., Paris. 1993. Le Colinguisme, Que-Sais-Je?: PUF.

 “A propos du sionisme : messianisme et nationalisme.” l’Agenda de la pensée contemporaine(9).

Ce texte a paru dans le N° 9 (Hiver 2007-2008) de l’Agenda de la pensée contemporaine, publié par les Centres Roland-Barthes et Marcel-Granet de l’Institut de la pensée contemporaine aux Editions Flammarion, en tant que compte-rendu des ouvrages suivants :

Jacqueline Rose, The Question of Zion, Princeton University Press, 2005.

Idith Zertal, La nation et la mort. La Shoah dans le discours et la politique d’Israël, Traduit de l’anglais par Marc Saint-Upéry, Editions La Découverte, 2004.

Amnon Raz-Krakotzkin : Exil et souveraineté. Judaïsme, sionisme et pensée bi-nationale, traduction par Catherine Neuve-Eglise, La Fabrique, 2007 (préface de Carlo Ginzburg).

Au moment où l’expropriation des « territoires occupés » par Israël achève de vider de son contenu l’hypothèse des deux Etats en Palestine, détruisant et morcelant le pays de façon apparemment irréversible, et où le conflit comme tel perd largement de son autonomie dans le cadre d’un état de guerre régional que polarise l’affrontement entre l’impérialisme américain, ses alliés et ses divers opposants (islamistes ou non), à quoi bon de nouvelles analyses de fond à propos de la constitution du sionisme ? Le décalage paraît abyssal entre leurs références historiques et théoriques complexes, la distance qu’elles établissent par rapport aux stéréotypes, et la brutalité des choix qu’un siècle de guerres et de violences, de manœuvres diplomatiques et de fausses solutions politiques, offre finalement aux parties en présence : élimination ou « transfert », à court terme, des populations arabes à l’exception de quelques zones de concentration et de surveillance, ou à plus long terme des populations juives au prix d’une nouvelle émigration massive. Ou l’une d’abord, et l’autre ensuite. [1]

Pourtant de telles analyses importent à plusieurs titres et je suis convaincu qu’il faut toujours prendre le temps de les conduire et de les discuter. D’une part elles révèlent les contradictions internes d’une idéologie et d’une politique qui, dans des conditions et des rapports de forces donnés, auront contribué comme peu d’autres à « faire l’histoire » dont nous sommes aujourd’hui les sujets – où que nous nous trouvions dans le monde. On peut certes s’en servir comme d’arguments polémiques contre tel ou tel, mais on peut aussi y voir l’indice des potentialités de division qui se sont cristallisées dans le passé, et pourraient le faire à nouveau si les circonstances s’y prêtent, contribuant à éviter le pire. L’essor de la pensée critique (dite parfois globalement « post-sioniste ») en Israël dans la petite minorité qui s’oppose vraiment à la colonisation et recherche l’action commune avec la résistance palestinienne est à vrai dire impressionnant. D’autre part, elles ouvrent à la réflexion des possibilités de comparaison entre un cas « extrême », sinon unique en son genre, et une multiplicité de formations étatiques qui associent elles aussi, bien que tout autrement, des composantes « messianiques » et des composantes « nationales », dans une synthèse de plus en plus problématique aujourd’hui. D’un côté, par conséquent, il s’agit de faire ressortir contre l’évidence l’indétermination logée au cœur d’une situation déterminée. De l’autre, il s’agit de contribuer à une réflexion globale sur les forces et les représentations impliquées dans les changements de notre horizon cosmopolitique. Dans les deux cas, il faut faire droit au passé agissant au sein du présent, en appliquant le maximum de rigueur à l’intelligence de ses pouvoirs.

C’est dans cette perspective que je voudrais confronter ici trois ouvrages récemment parus à propos du sionisme, qui domine toujours le « sens commun » des perceptions de la question juive et de son intrication avec l’histoire et les fonctions de l’Etat d’Israël. Dans la différence de leurs positions sur des points névralgiques, ils ont en commun de remettre en question l’idée d’une coupure entre le religieux et le politique, et de montrer dans la trajectoire d’Israël, non pas sans doute une histoire sainte, mais une histoire des puissances du sacré dans le monde profane, et de ses effets sur ceux-là mêmes qui s’en servent. Ils ont aussi l’intérêt d’articuler avec l’actualité une conjoncture intellectuelle étonnante, qui a vu tour à tour converger et s’opposer, autour de la critique de l’idée d’un « Etat Juif » en Palestine, les tenants d’un sionisme culturel alternatif et ceux d’un cosmopolitisme enraciné dans l’expérience juive de l’exclusion : l’épisode le plus frappant à cet égard étant la confrontation entre Scholem et Arendt au lendemain de la publication par celle-ci de son « rapport » sur le procès Eichmann.

Le premier ouvrage auquel je me réfère ne vient pas d’Israël, même si son auteur y entretient de multiples relations : c’est celui de Jacqueline Rose, The Question of Zion, issu de conférences données en 2003 à l’Université de Princeton. [2] Dans son premier chapitre (« The apocalyptic sting »), Rose commence par s’intéresser au fond messianique du sionisme politique en s’inspirant des analyses aujourd’hui classiques (mais toujours controversées) de Gershom Scholem sur l’histoire de la Kabbale et du messianisme juif. [3]

C’est Scholem lui-même qui, dès son installation en Palestine, avait opéré un rapprochement entre le sionisme et le sabbataïsme, dans lesquels il voyait les deux moments politiques de l’histoire du peuple juif à l’époque moderne. Le caractère « historique » de la rédemption dans le judaïsme (par opposition à l’idée chrétienne d’un salut dans l’autre monde), associé à l’espérance d’une fin des persécutions endurées dans l’exil et l’esclavage d’Israël, engendre une idéologie révolutionnaire que Scholem appelle « utopique » et « apocalyptique ». Résultat d’une « attente messianique intense » [4], cette idéologie se représente l’âge messianique comme le moment d’un « affrontement final d’Israël et des Nations », une conflagration dotée d’une signification cosmique dont les cataclysmes forment la condition de la renaissance nationale. A cette représentation (qui se retrouvera dans le marxisme) du rôle de la violence dans l’histoire, identifié aux souffrances d’un enfantement, une tradition particulière issue de la Kabbale ajoute une dimension spécifiquement antinomique : l’ère messianique n’est pas seulement celle de la réunion au sein de la divinité des parties du monde « brisé » depuis la création, c’est aussi, en vue de « hâter la fin », celui d’une inversion de la loi ou de sa réalisation à travers sa transgression (« c’est en violant la Torah qu’on l’accomplit »), forme spécifique de « l’activisme [prenant] l’utopie comme levier en vue de l’instauration du royaume messianique » – si indécise d’ailleurs que demeure la figure du messie lui-même. [5]

Le judaïsme traditionaliste et rationaliste (Maïmonide) a toujours vivement résisté à cette conception révolutionnaire – dans laquelle Scholem n’hésite pas à lire un « circuit d’influences mutuelles » du judaïsme et du christianisme millénariste. [6] Mais l’épisode de l’avènement, de la reconnaissance et de l’apostasie du « faux messie » Sabbataï Zevi, dont le retentissement a été immense au XVIIe siècle dans les communautés juives et dans le monde chrétien, est venu lui apporter une vérification spectaculaire. La « rédemption par le péché » y forme le lien « politique » entre le pouvoir charismatique du messie et l’espérance du peuple, allant jusqu’à l’autodissolution de ses traditions et débouchant sur une conception nihiliste de la destruction comme voie de la rédemption. [7] Scholem lui-même a vu dans cet épisode une première manifestation du nationalisme juif et de ses projets de libération, anticipant le sionisme de Herzl. Il n’a cessé, en conséquence, de mettre en garde contre l’identification du retour des Juifs exilés en Palestine avec la rédemption, cherchant à « neutraliser » la dimensions apocalyptique du messianisme, mais sans le liquider, en maintenant séparés le moment politique lié aux structures nationales, étatiques, territoriales, et le moment spirituel, et en recherchant une interprétation mystique de la rédemption comme rétablissement de l’unité et de l’harmonie du monde. [8] Ses interventions tendent à définir cet écart, en particulier dans les années où il s’associe à Martin Buber, au rabbin Judah Leib Magnes (fondateur de l’Université hébraïque de Jérusalem) et à d’autres intellectuels installés en Palestine au sein du mouvement Brit Shalom qui combat le ralliement du sionisme aux perspectives de conquête prônées par le « révisionnisme » de Jabotinsky. [9] L’une des plus remarquables est une lettre à Franz Rosenzweig de 1926, dans laquelle il s’inquiète des conséquences pour la langue sacrée, mais aussi pour la conscience collective et l’avenir des Juifs établis en Palestine, de la transformation de l’hébreu en langue nationale : « Dieu ne restera pas silencieux », c’est-à-dire que malgré l’apparente sécularisation de la langue, les puissances apocalyptiques recélées par l’invocation des récits sacrés tendront à se réaliser – quels qu’en soient les obstacles et le prix humain. [10]

Jacqueline Rose se sert de la conception de Scholem pour interpréter la trajectoire du sionisme depuis la rédaction du roman utopique de Herzl, Altneuland (1902), jusqu’à la fondation d’Israël comme « Etat juif » sur la terre de Palestine (1948) et à la situation actuelle d’occupation et d’anéantissement progressif de la société palestinienne. Elle y voit une réalisation de l’élément antinomique du messianisme transformé en programme d’action politique, à la fois destructeur et autodestructeur. Les analogies entre la personnalité maniaco-dépressive de Sabbataï Zevi et celle de Herzl constituent un des points d’appui de son argumentation, qui n’a pas manqué de susciter la polémique. [11] Mais l’essentiel porte sur les rapports entre deux questions : celle du territoire national comme « terre de rédemption » assignée au peuple par la révélation ou par l’histoire, mais suspendue à une appropriation interminable, toujours « insuffisante » et donc d’autant plus éradicatrice des traces historiques antérieures ; et celle du narcissisme collectif susceptible de transformer tout « corps étranger » en ennemi et de faire d’un peuple de victimes un peuple d’oppresseurs. Rose conduit sa réflexion à la lumière des conceptions psychanalytiques (Freud, Bion, Lacan) de l’identité collective et des mécanismes de défense contre la réalité qu’elle engendre. Tout tourne donc autour des figures de l’extrême violence et de son élaboration imaginaire. Le mythe d’une Palestine « terre sans peuple » – dénégation qui peut porter soit sur la présence physique des « nomades » (en réalité des paysans), soit sur la légitimité de l’implantation historique des Arabes dans la « terre de la Bible », soit sur l’identité nationale même des Palestiniens – doit être forcé dans la réalité contre les « puissances du mal » qui lui résistent. Cependant que la réalité historique de l’antisémitisme et son aboutissement traumatique dans le génocide se retournent dans la conviction que les victimes du sionisme sont en réalité ses persécuteurs. [12] C’est ainsi que toute manifestation d’hostilité devient une menace d’anéantissement (physique, mais aussi symbolique : déchéance et « honte » collective, traduisant l’impuissance des Juifs, telle que la Shoah a été longtemps présentée en Israël), contre laquelle tous les moyens sont sanctifiés (« tout soldat de la milice juive est une actualisation du messie »). [13]

Le cœur de cette analyse est donc une réflexion psycho-politique sur la façon dont l’antisémitisme en est venu à constituer, non seulement (comme Herzl n’avait de cesse de le répéter) l’allié objectif du sionisme, anéantissant les illusions d’assimilation et persuadant les Juifs que la persécution est pour eux le seul destin en dehors de « leur » Etat, mais le schème projectif d’une conception mélancolique de soi, dans laquelle le groupe se voit (et redoute en même temps de se voir) comme victime absolue, objet de la haine meurtrière d’un Autre à la fois omniprésent et radicalement méchant. Cette conception de l’identité collective évite toute remise en question de sa propre politique et permet par avance de verser la critique au compte de l’hostilité. Elle n’est évidemment pas la seule possible bien que, dans des circonstances déterminées qui « libèrent » l’élément antinomique de l’inconscient lui-même, elle soit peut-être irrésistible. C’est pourquoi Rose confère une importance essentielle, au centre de son livre, à l’alternative pour laquelle plaida au sein du sionisme le courant « spirituel » inauguré par Ahad Ha’am (Asher Ginzberg) [14], en qui elle voit non seulement l’inspirateur précoce, en face de Herzl, d’une critique du nationalisme exclusif qui rend invisibles les occupants antérieurs de la terre promise, mais (anticipant le Freud du Malaise dans la civilisation en même temps qu’il poursuit une tradition rabbinique) l’initiateur d’une « clinique » des identifications mélancoliques, qui libérerait la conscience collective de la plainte et de l’injonction sans pitié des ancêtres. [15]

C’est aussi du rapport aux ancêtres que nous parle, selon une tout autre méthode, l’ouvrage d’Idith Zertal, La nation et la mort. La Shoah dans le discours et la politique d’Israël, qui me semble n’avoir reçu jusqu’à présent qu’une attention biaisée ou insuffisante. [16] Idith Zertal s’intéresse en historienne à la constitution et aux fonctions de la mémoire collective, puisant aux travaux de Maurice Halbwachs et, plus récemment, de Benedict Anderson et d’autres historiens de la culture nationale. Elle rejoint en conclusion les positions d’Arendt qu’elle essaye d’adapter aux conditions de la politique israélienne actuelle.

La plus grande partie de son livre est une étude détaillée de la façon dont a été construit et incorporé à tout un ensemble de commémorations et d’institutions éducatives le « lien crucial et exclusif » entre la mémoire de la Shoah et la politique de défense de l’Etat d’Israël. [17] Son effet pervers est l’inscription au cœur de la conscience collective d’une équivalence entre le monde arabe (aujourd’hui, de plus en plus : musulman) et un nouvel hitlérisme, martelée dans les discours de l’élite politico-militaire (sauf par Rabin avant son assassinat…) et largement adoptée par l’opinion publique. Il est à noter ici, pour prévenir les hauts cris, que Zertal (pas plus que Rose précédemment) ne conteste qu’Israël ait des ennemis, ni que ses ennemis souhaitent ou fantasment son élimination. [18] Elle ne conteste pas non plus que, dès l’époque du Yishouv et pendant la Deuxième guerre mondiale, des dirigeants palestiniens aient imaginé une alliance avec le nazisme contre « l’ennemi commun » [19] et que le révisionnisme ou le négationnisme soient largement encouragés aujourd’hui dans le monde arabo-islamique. Ce n’est pas de cela qu’il s’agit mais de la construction endogène d’une image collective de soi [20] par la superposition, autour de certains événements symboliques, de deux systèmes de représentations dont l’un reconstruit l’histoire ancienne ou récente, et l’autre interprète politiquement le contemporain, qui échangent en permanence leurs pouvoirs de figurer le réel, pour légitimer la déshumanisation de l’ennemi. Ce n’est pas forcer le sens de l’argumentation de Zertal, par conséquent, que de lui attribuer pour mobile non pas une sous-estimation de l’importance de la Shoah dans la conscience et l’histoire juives contemporaines, mais bien une révolte devant son instrumentalisation et finalement sa banalisation [21], qui la prive de sa réalité historique et dépossède ses victimes au profit de son imminence imaginaire dans une tout autre conjoncture politique – rendant par là-même, eu égard à la disproportion, invisibles et impensables les violences et les crimes du présent.

Son analyse articule plusieurs moments. Le premier porte sur la fiction d’une chaîne de sacrifices héroïques pour la patrie, initiée bien avant la proclamation de l’indépendance et la guerre de 1948, appropriant au cas d’Eretz Israël le modèle européen du lien sacré entre « la terre et le sang » – à ceci près qu’il s’agit en Palestine, pour une part essentielle, de créer, déplacer et défendre la frontière contre un ennemi intérieur – dont le modèle est la résistance jusqu’à la mort des colons de Tel Haï en Haute Galilée contre leurs assaillants arabes (1920). [22] Avec les deux autres exemples-clés, celui de l’exaltation de l’insurrection du ghetto de Varsovie (1943) comme un « combat sioniste pour l’honneur d’Israël » [23] et celui de la tragédie de l’Exodus gérée par la direction de l’Agence juive en vue d’influer sur les débats de la Commission de l’ONU en 1947, on passe déjà à une seconde question, encore plus délicate, celle du tri effectué par la politique israélienne entre les témoignages et même les personnes des survivants. Son point d’aboutissement est une discussion de la façon dont la construction étatique de la mémoire a refoulé ce quelle considérait comme « honteux » du point de vue de l’homme nouveau et construit des boucs émissaires au sein des victimes elles-mêmes, en exonérant au passage de véritables collaborateurs. [24] Ce qui se dégage alors, suivant l’expression frappante de Zertal, c’est une « mémoire sans sujets » (p. 121), un « mélange d’appropriation et d’exclusion » (p. 36) dont le sens idéologique est de construire une « religion civique » (p. 82) et de « purifier » Israël lui-même de la « honte juive » que représenterait la mort infâme des victimes impuissantes (pp. 91, 115).

Sans restituer pour autant aux survivants le droit à la parole, dont l’Etat (et secondairement l’armée, les organisations de colons) se feront à leur place les « héritiers patentés » (p. 237), l’officialisation du culte des morts de la Shoah dont le procès Eichmann de 1961 a constitué la plaque tournante procédera néanmoins sur ce point à un déplacement significatif. La Shoah n’est plus rangée du côté de la dégénérescence et de la « passivité » du juif de ghetto en face de laquelle se dresse « l’homme nouveau » qu’incarne le pionnier sioniste, elle est transfigurée en événement fondateur de la renaissance nationale et signe négatif de l’élection d’Israël, garantissant a priori la sainteté de ses objectifs et des moyens (notamment militaires) destinés à les atteindre. [25] Son « unicité » n’est plus discutée (comme ce fut encore le cas à l’époque du Biafra) mais revendiquée et sacralisée. [26] A nouveau donc, et sur une beaucoup plus grande échelle, une situation est lue systématiquement dans l’ombre d’une autre, instituant une psychologie collective angoissée qui déborde toutes les circonstances particulières susceptibles de l’alimenter (guerres régionales, attentats-suicides, revendication palestinienne du « droit au retour »), et aboutissant à la conscience de soi d’Israël comme une « nation réfugiée » placée en permanence sous le signe de l’extermination. « Dans cet univers où toutes les significations sont inversées et toutes les projections permises, les peuples conquis deviennent conquérants, les persécuteurs sont transformés en persécutés, les criminels en victimes, et ce monde à l’envers est sanctionné par le sceau suprême d’Auschwitz. » [27]

On comprend dans ces conditions que l’intervention d’Arendt s’exprimant « en tant que juive » dans son compte-rendu et son interprétation du procès Eichmann, mais refusant toute affiliation de groupe [28], ait fait scandale, et que ce scandale dure encore. Après avoir pour la première fois publié en hébreu la lettre d’Arendt à Scholem que celui-ci s’était engagé à faire paraître avec la sienne, Idith Zertal consacre un long chapitre à cette apologie de la pensée libre (Selbstdenken, formule tirée de Lessing) contre « la catastrophe du messianisme politique », et s’en inspire dans ses conclusions. A ses yeux, par delà la critique du manque de parole du grand historien, la polémique est exemplaire de la façon dont le courant passé par l’utopie de l’entente judéo-arabe se divise entre un nationalisme culturel, impuissant à se dissocier des extrapolations mythiques de l’histoire, alors même qu’il en étudie savamment la généalogie, et une « citoyenneté du monde » pour qui le problème politique essentiel est celui des conditions historiques de cohabitation entre les diverses exigences d’autodétermination, comme telles aussi inconditionnellement justifiées que mutuellement antagonistes.

La controverse Scholem-Arendt occupe aussi une place centrale dans notre troisième ouvrage, celui d’Amnon Raz-Krakotzkin : Exil et souveraineté. Judaïsme, sionisme et pensée bi-nationale. [29] Mais, sur le fond de l’amitié commune avec Walter Benjamin, dont chacun des deux écrivains s’est en quelque sorte attaché à l’un des côtés de la pensée, elle est réexaminée à partir de la « théologie politique » qui sous-tend la construction de l’Etat d’Israël et son expansion coloniale jusqu’aux limites (d’ailleurs indéterminées) del’Eretz Israël biblique. Troisième perspective, donc, recoupant et déplaçant les précédentes. [30] Il ne saurait être question de rendre compte ici intégralement d’un texte éminemment discutable (espérons qu’il le soit), mais éblouissant d’érudition et d’ambition théorique. Après avoir indiqué en quel sens l’auteur entend la notion qui figure dans son titre et commande ses conclusions pratiques, je concentrerai mes remarques sur trois points transversaux.

Krakotzkin prend soin de distinguer ce qu’il appelle la « pensée binationale » d’une solution institutionnelle quelconque du conflit israélo-palestinien dans la forme d’un ou de deux Etats. Esquissée dans l’entre-deux-guerres autour de Buber, Magnes, Scholem, Arendt, et survivant aujourd’hui en Israël dans la minorité qui se bat pour les droits des Palestiniens, elle consiste d’abord dans une reconnaissance effective de la présence des Arabes [31] comme premiers occupants de la terre en Palestine, ensuite dans l’idée que « les droits des Juifs et des Arabes forment un tout » de sorte qu’on ne peut faire progresser la démocratie qu’en « traitant simultanément les deux facettes » (p. 209), et ne raisonnant plus en termes de souveraineté exclusive, mais limitée ou partagée. Enfin, ce qui est plus difficile, elle pose que pour les Juifs eux-mêmes « la Palestine est un pays d’exil », comme elle l’est devenue pour les Palestiniens, de sorte qu’il n’y a pas d’identification eschatologique possible entre le « retour » des Juifs en Palestine et la construction d’un Etat au sein du Moyen-Orient. [32] Elle constitue donc à la fois une « réforme intellectuelle et morale » et une méthodologie politique dans la situation d’aujourd’hui, sans fin prévisible.

Dans cette perspective, la première thèse du livre est que la distinction admise entre un camp « laïque » et un camp « religieux » en Israël est dénuée de sens. Car c’est le nationalisme laïque et notamment le socialisme, dominant au moment de la fondation de l’Etat et responsable de sa politique, seul ou en coalition, pendant des décennies, qui a réalisé la « sécularisation » et la conservation des schèmes théologico-politiques : sacralisant les symboles nationaux (le drapeau à l’étoile de David), faisant de la Bible la référence absolue pour la représentation des frontières, et de la terre d’Israël un lieu d’élection qui ne peut être approprié que par les Juifs. Krakotzkin résume dans un Witz cette sécularisation à rebours : « Dieu n’existe pas, mais il nous a promis cette terre ». Cette théologie déniée mais omniprésente combine donc étroitement l’aspect politique, l’absolutisation de la formation nationale étatique, avec une déviation religieuse apocalyptique [33] au regard de l’idée de la condition humaine comme exil, qui constituerait le fond éthique et mystique du judaïsme, communiquant avec l’interdiction de « hâter la fin ». [34] Elle entraîne comme conséquence paradoxale qu’il faut plutôt chercher les opposants au messianisme politique du côté des penseurs et des partis « religieux » qui s’opposent à l’idée du territoire israélien comme terre sainte, que du côté des « laïques » autoproclamés. [35]

La négation de l’exil, cette fois dans un sens directement historique, est aussi au cœur de la critique par Krakotzkin de « l’orientalisme » (au sens de Said) qui selon lui imprègne les images de soi et les politiques culturelles de l’Etat d’Israël. Le paradoxe est qu’une nation née de la persécution subie par les Juifs en Europe se conçoive (dès les écrits de Herzl) comme l’avant-garde d’une européanisation du Moyen-Orient et, retournant contre elle-même – non sans une extrême ambivalence – le système des « stigmates » inventés par l’orientalisme, en vienne à pourchasser avec acharnement dans son histoire, ses traditions culturelles, sa composition ethnique, tout ce qui évoque l’altérité par rapport aux modèles de communauté développés par les nations et les empires coloniaux européens. Cet orientalisme « délocalisé » ou projeté hors de son lieu d’origine vaut naturellement pour la négation systématique des droits et de l’existence des occupants arabes de la Palestine et pour la représentation de l’Islam sous les traits de l’arriération et du fanatisme. Mais il vaut aussi pour la violence symbolique dont font l’objet les Juifs « orientaux » et l’effacement systématique de la culture judéo-arabe, populaire aussi bien que savante, pourtant liée au grand moment de renaissance du judaïsme médiéval entre Bagdad et Cordoue. [36] Un paradoxe pour un Etat qui se construit en plein Moyen-Orient et dont, outre les 20% d’Arabes israéliens, près de la moitié de la population majoritaire provient du Yemen, d’Irak et du Maghreb ! Plus profondément encore il vaut pour la façon dont, reniant une conception spécifiquement juive de l’historicité (telle que Benjamin tentera de la retrouver) au profit du « grand récit » de la modernisation étatique, le discours dominant en Israël présente l’essentiel de l’histoire juive millénaire, dans les conditions de la diaspora, comme une longue parenthèse négative et une expérience d’aliénation de l’identité collective. La construction de l’homme nouveau devient ainsi, non seulement l’instrument de « l’éradication du passé », mais le processus dans lequel sont assimilés et entérinés les stéréotypes de l’antijudaïsme européen.

A la pointe extrême de cette critique, Krakotzkin en vient alors, développant une intuition de Scholem contre Scholem lui-même, à argumenter en faveur de la thèse selon laquelle la « théologie politique sécularisée » qui commande la politique israélienne, n’est pas tant l’effet d’une déviation interne du messianisme juif que le résultat de son imprégnation par des schèmes spécifiquement chrétiens : depuis l’appropriation des principes protestants de lecture littéraliste et d’autorité exclusive de la Bible jusqu’à l’utilisation de l’extermination comme moment théophanique fondateur, signe de Dieu dans l’histoire profane, en passant par la représentation de la « fin de l’exil » comme une « rentrée dans l’histoire » au sens progressif et positif du terme. [37] C’est contre une telle inversion des perspectives, beaucoup plus aliénante que la « dégénérescence » à laquelle elle prétend mettre fin, que Krakotzkin invoque l’idée benjaminienne d’une histoire de la rédemption comme « histoire des vaincus » (ou, dans le langage d’Arendt, des « parias »). [38] Elle n’a d’ailleurs rien de purement spéculatif, puisqu’elle commande à ses yeux la possibilité même d’exercer une responsabilité politique des conséquences pour les autres et pour soi de la conquête sioniste, dont dépendent les chances à vrai dire bien ténues de ne pas en payer collectivement le prix fort. [39]

Pour conclure, je voudrais insister sur deux problèmes qui appellent à l’évidence de nouvelles réflexions. Un point commun aux analyses de Rose, de Zertal et de Raz-Krakotzkin, que la divergence même de leurs méthodes fait ressortir avec plus de force (et même de violence), c’est la prégnance de l’antisémitisme et la profondeur des effets différés que son intériorisation ne cesse de produire dans la conscience de soi ou Selbstthematisierung indissociable de la construction nationale israélienne. Sans doute admettra-t-on qu’aucune forme (et l’on sait qu’il y en a plus d’une…) d’identification au judaïsme et à la judéité ne peut en être indemne. Le traumatisme de la Shoah, transmis de génération en génération, lui ajoute une dimension de fatalité très difficilement résistible. Mais la situation est qualitativement différente pour la conscience nationale israélienne parce que le rapport du « soi » à « l’autre » (l’étranger, l’ennemi) y fait l’objet d’une construction institutionnelle, d’une appropriation politique, et que cette construction se déroule dans les conditions d’une colonisation, donc d’une dénégation « vitale » de la condition d’oppresseurs des anciennes victimes (ou plutôt – ce qui n’est pas tout à fait la même chose – de leurs héritiers). Tout se passe alors – effet de « dette perverse », dit Zertal – comme si la formule de Sartre : « c’est l’antisémite qui fait le Juif », avait trouvé une réalisation différée : c’est l’antisémitisme qui construit la judéité pour l’Israélien, à la fois dans la définition de ce qu’il rejette hors de lui-même et dans ce à quoi il s’identifie – la catégorie suprêmement ambivalente de « victime » rassemblant paradoxalement les deux aspects.

La conséquence pratique qui semble s’en dégager est double, et bien entendu ne concerne aucunement les seuls juifs, ou Israéliens. D’une part, il faut approfondir, comme avaient commencé à le faire chacun à sa façon Hilberg, Arendt, Poliakov, Arno Mayer, la nature du lien historique entre antisémitisme et extermination, qui n’a rien de logique ou de linéaire. D’autre part il faut inscrire une lutte idéologique sans merci contre les formes présentes de l’antisémitisme (en Orient comme en Occident) à l’ordre du jour de toute tentative de contribuer à une solution du conflit israélo-palestinien par la « neutralisation », autant que faire se peut, du messianisme nationaliste : car celui-ci se nourrit de toute circonstance dans laquelle le réel s’offre à vérifier son imaginaire. Ce qui n’implique pas de céder au chantage auquel est exposé tout examen critique de l’histoire et de la politique israélienne. La difficulté vient de ce que l’antisémitisme est certes utilisé tactiquement par Israël, mais forme beaucoup plus profondément un point d’ancrage inconscient de son identité, originairement associé au discours du sionisme, que les obstacles et les démentis n’affaiblissent pas mais renforcent.

Sur un autre plan, les analyses de nos auteurs réactivent une question complexe mais cruciale : en quoi la formation idéologique désignée ici comme « messianisme nationaliste » ou sacralisation de la nation par « l’ange de la mort » est-elle spécifiquement israélienne ? Une partie de la fascination qu’exerce le sionisme, en Occident ou ailleurs, sur des esprits qui n’ont pas de sympathie particulière pour la colonisation, mais qui, en revanche, sont attachés à une conception « civique » ou « républicaine » de la nation et à la façon particulière dont elle conjugue universalisme et communautarisme, égalitarisme et exclusion, ne vient-elle pas de ce que le nationalisme israélien porte à l’extrême (et au point de rupture) une formation idéologique qui ne lui est pas – ou pas entièrement – propre ? Dans un moment où se voit partout remise en question la combinaison de messianisme et de nationalisme qui est plus ou moins indissociable de la traduction d’une identité historique en politique d’Etat, et s’attache selon les cas aux idées de mission civilisatrice, d’Elect nation, de « terre de résurrection » sur laquelle naît l’homme nouveau, ou de « nation victime de l’histoire » (France, USA, URSS, Pologne, Inde, Iran…), le cas particulier d’Israël apparaît comme le bastion d’une certaine image de la souveraineté, et comme le lieu où elle est (toujours déjà) dans l’ombre de la mort. [40] La formule très spinozienne du rabbin Haïm Grodzinski que rapporte Krakotzkin : « Israël est un Etat comme les autres », prend alors une autre signification. [41] Elle commande une enquête plus complète sur tout ce que le couple de la terre des ancêtres et du patriotisme sacrificiel, exacerbé par le nationalisme israélien, doit en réalité à l’histoire européenne des nationalismes (Barrès !). Mais aussi, évidemment, sur le fait que celle-ci n’a cessé de réactiver et d’exploiter les modèles bibliques : et l’on retrouve le « circuit d’influences mutuelles » dont parlait Scholem. Enfin, elle demande que nous posions le problème de la spécificité et de la singularité (de l’unicité, si l’on veut) de l’histoire juive en Israël et en dehors d’Israël, non pas en termes d’essences ou d’identités, mais en termes de relations et d’altérités internes, au passé comme au présent. Tout Etat est « comme les autres », mais aucune histoire nationale n’est comme une autre, puisqu’elle reflète en son sein toutes les autres.

Notes

[1] Voir, pour ne faire état sur ce point que de nos hypothèses personnelles : Etienne Balibar et Jean-Marc Lévy-Leblond : « Guerre en Orient ou paix en Méditerranée ? », Le Monde du 19 août 2006 (version non abrégée disponible sur le site http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0&#8230;).

[2] Sa traduction a été refusée par un grand éditeur français. Professeur à l’Université de Londres, J. Rose est notamment l’auteur de The Haunting of Sylvia Plath, 1991, Virago ; Why War – Psychoanalysis, Politics and the Return to Melanie Klein, 1993, Blackwell (en coll.) ; On Not Being Able to Sleep – Essays on Psychoanalysis in the Modern World, 2003, Chatto ; ainsi que d’une introduction à la nouvelle traduction anglaise des essais de Freud sur la « psychologie des masses » (Penguin Books).

[3] Voir en particulier, en français, Gershom Scholem : Le messianisme juif. Essais sur la spiritualité du judaïsme (Calmann Lévy, 1974) (où figure l’essai sur « La rédemption par le péché »), et Sabbataï Tsevi, le messie mystique 1626-1676 (Verdier 1990). La présentation la plus complète de la trajectoire intellectuelle de Scholem est celle de David Biale : Gershom Scholem. Cabale et contre-histoire, Editions de l’éclat 2001. Voir également Pierre Bouretz : Témoins du futur. Philosophie et messianisme, Gallimard 2003, chap. IV (« Gershom Scholem : la Tradition entre connaissance et réparation »).

[4] Voir Le messianisme juif, op. cit., p. 27.

[5] Ibid., p. 40.

[6] Ibid., p. 42.

[7] Ibid., p. 139 sq., et Sabbataï Tsevi…, cit.

[8] Sur la thématique de la « neutralisation du messianisme » chez Scholem, cf. Biale, cit., p. 132 sq.

[9] Voir Martin Buber : Une terre et deux peuples, la question judéo-arabe, Lieu Commun, Paris 1985.

[10] L’essentiel des interventions politiques de Scholem entre 1916 et 1974 est traduit dans le recueil Le prix d’Israël, Editions de l’Eclat, Paris 2003. La lettre à Rosenzweig, longtemps ignorée, joue aussi un rôle central dans les analyses beaucoup plus critiques de Raz-Krakotzkin, soulignant que c’est à partir d’une « interprétation typiquement messianique de la situation » que Scholem « met en garde contre le danger messianique que cache la laïcisation » (Exil et souveraineté, p. 133). Le rapport « ambivalent » (selon Carlo Ginzburg) de Krakotzkin à l’œuvre et à la personnalité de Scholem est influencé par les critiques de la nouvelle génération de spécialistes de la Kabbale contre sa conception « nationale » du messianisme ancien (cf. Moshe Idel : Messianisme et mystique, Paris 1994 ; Mystiques messianiques de la kabbale au hassidisme, XIIIe-XIXe siècle, Paris 2005).

[11] Voir en particulier l’échange avec Shalom Lappin dans la revue online http://www.democratiya.com/review.a….

[12] J. Rose renvoie ici à l’article essentiel d’Edward Said (à la mémoire duquel son livre est dédié) : « Zionism from the point of view of its victims » (1979).

[13] Formule du dirigeant socialiste Shmuel Yavne’eli, datant de 1918, citée par Rose p. 150. Le thème de la « honte nationale » est également analysé par Idith Zertal. Il est rattaché par Krakotzkin à une problématique plus générale de l’abjection du juif « exilique », notoirement insistante dans la formation du caractère national israélien.

[14] dont s’est aussi réclamé Scholem (avant 1933) : « Je suis à cet égard un ahad-haamiste religieux », cit. in Le prix d’Israël, p. 163. Voir également D. Biale, cit., p. 40 sq., 171-175.

[15] Rose, cit., p. 96 sq.

[16] Auteur de nombreuses études sur l’histoire de l’Etat d’Israël et sur l’émigration en Palestine, Idith Zertal a été professeur à l’Université hébraïque de Jérusalem et au Centre interdisciplinaire d’Herzliya. Elle enseigne aujourd’hui à Bâle. Son ouvrage le plus récent (en collaboration avec Akiva Eldar) est : The War Over Israel’s Settlements in the Occupied Territories, 1967-2007, Nation Books 2007.

[17] Sur l’institution du « lien exclusif » entre la mémoire de la Shoah et le site de Jérusalem par la loi Yad Vashem, et son rapport à d’autres politiques des « lieux de mémoire », cf. Zertal, p. 120. Sur les réticences de certains rescapés de la Shoah, p. 130 sq.

[18] Ce point est particulièrement important en ce qui concerne la propagande nassérienne dans les jours qui précédèrent l’attaque de juin 1967, présentée dès lors comme un cas de légitime défense préventive. Cf. Zertal, cit., p. 166.

[19] Ibid., p. 144 sq., en particulier sur les démarches du grand Mufti Hadj Amin Al-Husseini.

[20] Les sociologues d’inspiration luhmanienne emploieraient ici la catégorie difficilement traduisible de « Selbstthematisierung » ou « auto-caractérisation » (cf. Ulrich Bielefeld : Nation und Gesellschaft. Selbstthematisierungen in Frankreich und Deutschland, Hamburg 2003).

[21] Sur le « long processus de banalisation de la Shoah », cf. pp. 88, 156, etc.

[22] Dans la version la plus étendue du récit mythique, qui noue les épisodes modernes à l’Antiquité (la destruction du Second Temple, la révolte de Bar Kokhba et la bataille de Massada), cette chaîne permet aussi de conforter l’idée d’une identité nationale et territoriale millénaire, dans laquelle la diaspora n’aurait représenté qu’une « non histoire » ou une parenthèse tragique avant la reconquête. Raz Krakotzkin de son côté discute la fiction de la révolte de Bar Kokhba et son opposition à la tradition rabbinique : Exil et souveraineté, p. 100 sq.

[23] Zertal, cit., p. 36 sq. Après d’autres, Zertal souligne que le principal dirigeant survivant du Ghetto de Varsovie, Marek Edelman, s’est toujours opposé à cette transfiguration de l’insurrection en épisode d’héroïsme « sioniste », et plus généralement à l’idée que la création de l’Etat d’Israël puisse représenter non seulement une conséquence historique, mais le « sens » révélé a posteriori de la Shoah (pp. 47 sq.).

[24] En particulier en vertu d’une loi de 1950 « contre les criminels de guerre et les auteurs de crimes contre l’humanité » présents en Israël même : Zertal, p. 83 sq. Dans la pratique, elle avait pour cible des Juifs, eux-mêmes survivants de la Shoah (comme les anciens kapos et responsables de chambrées des camps de concentration), mais aboutissait à exonérer largement les notables qui négocièrent avec les nazis au nom des Judenräte d’Europe centrale. Elle déboucha sur le scandale du procès Kastner (1952), dont Ben Gourion conçut le procès Eichmann comme la réparation symbolique (p. 112 sq.).

[25] Selon Zertal, qui suit sur ce point Arendt, mais aussi d’autres historiens (dont le britannique Trevor Roper, très favorable aux objectifs d’Israël), le procès a été rigoureusement conçu en ce sens.

[26] Sur l’assimilation des massacres du Biafra en 1968 et du génocide juif, et le dilemme moral alors affronté par Israël, cf. Michal Givoni : « Des victimes pas comme les autres. Réactions israéliennes face à la catastrophe du Biafra », in Israël et l’autre, sous la direction de William Ossipov, Editions Labor et Fides, Genève 2005.

[27] Zertal, p. 268-269 (« L’ange de la mort d’Auschwitz »). Rappelons qu’Edward Said, à contre-courant de son propre camp, avait appelé les Palestiniens et les Arabes à tenir compte de cette psychologie et, au-delà, à faire du génocide juif et des droits qu’il entraîne (dont ne faisaient pas partie à ses yeux celui de déposséder les autres) une des conditions de la solution du problème israélo-palestinien : The Question of Palestine (Londres, 1981) ; The Politics of Dispossession (Londres, 1994).

[28] Ce dont témoigne sa controverse avec Scholem à propos de « l’amour d’Israël » ou « amour du peuple juif » (Ahavat Israel), auquel elle oppose non « l’amour de l’humanité » mais celui des individus et des amis : voir Les origines du totalitarisme, suivi de Eichmann à Jérusalem, Gallimard 2002, p. 1342 sq., ainsi que G. Scholem, Fidélité et utopie. Essais sur le judaïsme contemporain, Calmann Lévy, 1978, p 213-228. Sur la conception de la « question juive » chez Arendt avant et après le procès Eichmann, voir Martine Leibovici, Hannah Arendt, une Juive. Expérience, politique et histoire (préface de P. Vidal-Naquet), Desclée de Brouwer, 1998.

[29] L’auteur est senior lecturer d’histoire du judaïsme à l’Université de Beersheva. Ses publications antérieures portent notamment sur la censure catholique et les transformations de la pensée juive qu’elle entraîne dans l’Europe classique.

[30] L’étroitesse des échanges réciproques entre Scholem et Benjamin sur la théologie et la philosophie de l’histoire (jusqu’aux « Thèses » de 1940, remises à Arendt et publiées par elle) fait l’objet du livre d’Eric Jacobson : Metaphysics of the Profane. The Political Theology of Walter Benjamin and Gershom Scholem, Columbia University Press 2003. Lire également Michael Löwy : Avertissement d’incendie. Une lecture des thèses « Sur le concept d’histoire », Paris 2001.

[31] au milieu desquels vivaient de tout temps des communautés juives, soumises par l’Empire Ottoman au statut minorisant de dhimmis

[32] Ce qui revient à critiquer la notion inscrite dans la Constitution israélienne d’un Etat « démocratique » parce que « juif » (et pour les juifs exclusivement). Cette idée du « pays d’exil » est liée à une élaboration « séculière » de la tradition religieuse pour qui la terre d’Israël ne constitue pas le lieu ou l’instrument du salut, mais celui où les juifs tentent de continuer à « vivre en exil » aussi longtemps que toute l’humanité n’est pas libérée de l’esclavage ou de l’oppression. Elle rejoint la critique de l’étatisme chez Benjamin et l’opposition tracée par Arendt entre la position du « parvenu » et celle du « paria ». Cf. p. 199-201.

[33] Puisqu’elle en vient à préférer l’autodestruction au partage de la terre : voir le développement sur « l’option de Samson » et le tabou de nomination portant sur l’arme nucléaire israélienne, p. 152 sq.

[34] Ibid., p. 45 sq., 197 sq.

[35] Ibid., p. 196-203 (avec référence à Baruch Kurzweill et Yeshayahou Leibowitz). Bien entendu les partis nationalistes religieux sont le fer de lance de la colonisation des territoires occupés.

[36] Krakotzkin parle de « désarabisation forcée » : p. 83. Il s’appuie en particulier sur l’œuvre de Gil Anidjar, philosophe et historien élève de Derrida, auteur de « Our Place in Al-Andalous » : Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters, Stanford 2002 ; de The Jew, the Arab : A History of the Enemy, Stanford 2003 ; et tout récemment de Semites : Race, Religion, Literature, Stanford 2008). Le refoulement israélien de l’élément judéo-arabe au cœur de sa propre identité historique est l’envers de la façon dont le discours de l’Europe « chrétienne » a fantasmatiquement installé le Juif et l’Arabe, depuis la Renaissance au moins, dans la position d’ennemis absolus, intérieur et extérieur, qui profondément ne font qu’un.

[37] Voir en particulier les chapitres I (« La négation de l’exil dans la conscience sioniste ») et II (« Le retour à l’histoire »). Scholem discute notamment des rapports entre messianisme juif et millénarisme chrétien dans Sabbataï Tsevi, cit., p. 105 sq.

[38] Voir essentiellement le chapitre VII : « Arendt, Benjamin, Scholem et le binationalisme ».

[39] Soigneusement distinguée d’une culpabilité : voir pp. 206 sq.

[40] On lira, je pense, une idée de ce genre sous-jacente à certains écrits récents de Jean-Claude Milner : voir Les penchants criminels de l’Europe démocratique, Verdier 2003, en particulier § 55, p. 97 sq. : « En vérité, il n’y a qu’un seul obstacle réel [à l’expansion de la « paix » européenne, synonyme de « société illimitée »] (…) c’est l’existence d’un Etat nommé Israël. Car Israël se présente comme un tout limité, dans la forme d’un Etat-nation, réclamant des frontières sûres et reconnues. Un tel langage est réputé intrinsèquement guerrier… ».

[41] Raz-Krakotzkin, cit., p. 111, 199. Cette formule me frappe d’autant plus qu’à l’époque de la perestroïka, au philosophe Lucien Sève qui me demandait avec une fausse naïveté (et une véritable angoisse) : « que penses-tu de l’URSS ? », j’avais répondu précisément cela : « C’est un Etat comme un autre… »

Balio, Tino. 1990. Hollywood in the Age of Television. Boston: Unwin Hyman.

Balla, M., S. Bujanovic, et al. (2012). Hungarian in contemporary Belgrade: a case of compartmentalized language. Languages in the City. Berlin, 2012.

Belgrade has developed differently from the rest of europe. They encountered the bloody breakup of Yugoslavia, the authoritarian and nationaistic regime, the abysmal economic crises etc…
Serbian indigenous languages (Hungarian, Greek tec…) and recentrly formed ones (Chinese) as well as international English.
Hungarians make 3.91% of the country’s total poulation. The greag majority of them live in Vojvodina however, over 1500 residents in Berlgrade claim Hungarian origin or native language
There are several institutions teaching Hungarian, including the Department of the Institute of Balkan studies at the Serbian academy of Science.
They don’t create a solid speech community. Hungarian is being actively used only in domains where its use is institutionalised and may thus serve as an example of a heavily comparmentalized language. Since the space of the Hungarian language use is so narrow and removed from the Serbian speaking places, we can not speak of a stable bilingualism, but rather of a controolled and intentionally or not margisnalised bilingualism.
The survey she contducted signals that Hungarian alongside other minorities and non-Serbian speech communities is being largely marginalised. It is thus clear that ethnocentric and monolingual ideologies are still prevailing, which underlie hidden assimilation

Ballantyne, D. e. M. Ballantyne, Davidson et McIntyre c. Canada.

Barber, Benjamin. 1995. Face à la Retribalisation du Monde. Esprit (Juin 1995):132-144.

132: L’AMERIQUE ET LA FRANCE, “république soeurs” partagent le besoin de réconcilier des sociétés multiculturelles et plurielles avec une idéologie civique de la démocratie qui implique l’intégration.
133:S’il est revendiqué en Améfique comme une propriété culturelle, le multiculturalisme hante ajjourd’hui, tel un spectre, l’Europe et le monde. La political correctness, les préoccupations de race et de sexe, les controverses sur le “canon”, l’intérêt pour le multiculturalisme qui donne naissance à tous ces phénomènes, continent sans doute de susciter plus de discours aux Etats-Unis qu’ailleurs; mais la pertinence de ces débats pour les autres continents apparaît enfin et la possibilité de tirer des leçons de l’expérience américaine est reconnue.
Le fait (stupéfiant) est que moins de 10% des Etats actuels sont réellement homogènes, et que l’ethnie majoritaire représente plus des trois quarts de la population dans la moitié des Etats seulement. Le multiculturalisme est la règle, l’homogénéité l’exception.
134:
la planète, qui s’unifie culturellement et commercialement, devient un monde dont les parties infranationales, ethniques, religieuses ou raciales, sont aujourd’hui beaucoup plus apparentes. Forcées à un incessant contact, les nations post-modernes ne peuvent tenir emprisonnées leur particularités.
137: Aux Etats-Unis, les politiques fondées sur l’identité (identity politics) servent à définir la moitié d’une personnalité double: on parle d'”Italien-Américain” ou d'”Africain-Américain”. Le préfixe (distinctif) définit l’assimilation de l’immigrand dans le suffixe (commun). Les seuls “Américains-Américains” sont les Indiens. Ainsi, être un Américain, c’est avoir une autre identité “avant” son identité américaine; avoir un trait d’union, c’est être véritablement américain”
Les Etats-Unis ont connu une guerre civile dans laquelle une grande partie du pays prétendait faire sécession. Une fois que celle-ci est commencée, il est difficile de l’arrêter. C’est pourquoi ddes méricains s’inquièetent de ce que la politique fondée sur l’identité aille trop loi, même dans notre culture assimilationiste.
139: Le marché capitaliste reste une sorte de porte de sortie(…)de “McMonde”: des forces économiques et écologiques qui exigent l’intégration et l’uniformité et qui hypnotisent le monde à coup de hard rock, d’ordinateurs surpuissants, de fast food, de MTV, Macintosh et MacDonald, enserrant les pays dans un réseau mondial commercialement homogène: un McMonde relié par la technologie, l’écologie, les communications et le commerce”. Le McMonde reste certainement le plus formidable rival du Jihad, et à terme peut même atténuer la force des tribalismes résurgents.
140: il y a toutes sortes de différences, il y a diverses versions du multiculturalisme, même en Amérique où, par exemple, les difficultés des descendants d’esclaves (les Africains-Américains) sont très différentes de celles des immigrants noirs des Caraïbes, qui réussissent bien mieux leur assimilation.
141: En Amérique, la séparation a toujours été une tactique à court terme à l’intérieur d’une stratégie à long terme d’intégration: on reconnaît la différence afin de renforcer le lien des différentes parties avec le tout et de faire la démonstration que l’idéologie du tout représente non pas l’hégémonie d’un groupe mais une possibilité d’inclusion authentique.

Barber, Benjamin R. 1993. L’Excellence et l’Egalité: de l’Education en Amérique. Translated by Michelot, Vincent and Weil François. Edited by J. Heffer and F. Weil, Cultures Américaines. Paris: Belin.

7: Le multiculturalisme, la political correctness, les études consacrées aux minorités raciales et aux femmes dans les universités ainsi que les controverses sur le “canon”, occupent aux Etats-Unis le devant de la scène plus que nulle part ailleurs.
(les nations européennes) étaient des Etats-nations au sens où on l’entendait au XIXe siècle, avec une langue, une culture, une histoire et une relition commune. Elles sont aujourd’hui de plus en plus multiculturelles.
…l’expérience américaine du multiculturalisme, toujours contetée mais relativement réussie, mérite que les Europens lui consacrent quelque attention.
8: Qui plus est, l’interdépendance toujours plus importante en matière économique etde communications entre les différents pays du monde signifie que même les nations qui conservent une homogénéité interne doivent fonctionner dans un environnement global de plus en plus multicultur
9: les Américains ont conservé leur trait d’union, comme dans “Italo-Américain”,”Noir Américain”…
10: Aux Etats-Unis, les Noirs se demandent pourqoi ils devraient honorer une constitution républicaine qui les a condamnés à presque une siècle d’esclavage.
15: des millions d’immigrants votent chque année avec leurs pieds en venant habiter un pays où la moitié des électeurs ne se soucient guère de voter.
L’Amérique, qui passe à l’étranger pour un parangon de la démocratie, semble souvent gouvernée par l’apathie et l’intérêt particulier.
16: notre identité se forge dans une relations dialectique à autrui, et elle est partie intégrante de la famille, de la tribu ou de la communauté.
21:…hystérie collective développée par les médias à propos de la political correctness
22: la plupart des livres publiés sur ce nouvel épisode de la crise chronique de notre système éducatif ont choisi de scinder la démocratie et l’éducationlDasns leur élan conservateur et antidémocratique, leurs auteurs -Allan Bloom (theClosing of the American Mind), Roger Kimball (Tenured Radicals), John Siber (Strait Shooting), Charles J. Sykes (Profscam) et Dinesh D’Souza (Illiberal Education)- associent tous la crise de l’éducationau progreesisme, à l’existence de professeurs gauchistes (radicals) et à un souci d’égalité (entre les étudiants, les cultures et les modèles pédagogiques).
23: Tandis que les enfants européens vont à l’école 240 jours par an, les jeunes Américains, à quelques exception rès,. se satisfont de 180 jours.
24: Les enseignants restent l’un des groupes les moins respectés et les moins payés aux Etats-Unis.
25: mais le but des écoles publiques n’est pas de donner des titres à ceux qui sont éduqués, mais d’éduquer ceux qui n’ont pas de titres.
26: Dans America Revised, qui étudie l’histoire des manuels d’histoire, Frances Fitzgerald offre une étonnante analyse de la manière dont, à mesure que changeaient modes et idéologies, les images ont été remodelées. Bien avant que les Hispaniques et les Américians d’origine asiatique ne commencent à rivaliser avec les Indiens et les Noirs pourse faire une place dans l’hisoire américaine, des débats similaires ont opposé Anglais et Hollandias, puritans et libre-penseurs, fermiers et industriels, patrons et ouvriers, propritéaires d’esclaves et abolitionnistes, fédéralistes et anti-fédéralistes, américains “de souche” (c’est à dire arrivés l’an dernier) et “immigrants” (arrivés cette année), citadins et ruraux, unitaires et pluralistes, progressistes et conservateurs, et d’innombrables d’autres factions.
39: …manuels scolaires qui, d’une génération à l’autre, racontent des histoires différentes, voire contradictoires: “Nous ” sommes les Britanniques, transformés par l’Amérique. “Nous” sommes les puritains et les protestants qui luttons contre des vagues d’étrangers comparables à ceux que nous avons fuis dans l’Europe que nous avons laissés derrière nous, et qui sont catholiques, corrompus et insassimilables. “Nous ” sommes un cruset qui absorbe vague après vague de nouveaux venus originaires de culrtures étrangères et qui les assimile dans la culture américaine. “Nous ” somems une nation pluraliste d’immigrants, une riche tapisserie de différences multiculturelles qui ne se fondent pas mais contiennent et embrassent desmondes variés. “Nous ” sommes une mosaïque dont la structure commune est constituée de morceaux séparés dont le carctère distinctif est essentiel à l’ensemble. “Nous ” sommes la grande majorité américaine, ceux qui ne sont pas propriétaires, les esclaves, les ofpprimés, les femmes, ceux qui ne sont pas blancs, les fermiers, les ouvriers, tous ceux que l’Amérique a exploités davantage qu’elle ne les a libérés et qu’elle a davantage trahis que soutenus par sa constituion théoriquement démocratique. Laquelle de ces hsoitres es t la nôtre? Cela dépend de quelle histoire, de quelles histoires nousnous réclamons.
L’hétérogénéité américaine fait que l’histoire des Etats-Unis, avec le temps, devient nécessairement plurielle, au sens où chaque génération la réécrit et la confronte avec la réalité du pluralisme. Plus l’histoire est inclusive, plus sa trame est pluraliste.
41: D’un autre côté, si en réaction à cette orthodoxie à oeuillères, l’histoire américaine n’est conçue que comme l’histoire d’une agression impérialiste et d’un génoci et, ainsi que le veulent certains tenants d’un révisionnisme radical, comme une histoire dont le seul but est l’exclusion, notre identité présente abandonne toute possibilité d’idéalisme et de jsutice.
52: …culture entièrement trournée vers le présent”
53: l’histoire américaine n’a peut-être jamais été aussi controversée qu’aujourd’hui, mais elle a toujours été plus controversée que les élites ne l’auraient souhaité. La perspective multuculturelle n’a de nouveau que le nom.
54: l’Amérique a toujours été la tentive de peuples multiples de devenir un peuple, la recherche de l’unité dans la diversité et la pluralité.
L’idée puriste d’une nation anglo-saxonne, blanche et prostestante (WASP) ne fut jamais que l’espoir péremptoire d’une partie de la population immigrante de l’Amérique. Ironiquement, lle survit aujourd’hui, princialement à l’état de cible de critiques cyniques.
55: creuset ou patchwork ou? Nation unie ou tapisserie multiculturelle?Terre vierge ou nation indienne?Terre de l’esclavage ou terre des braves (note: référence à l’hymne américain)?
E pluribus unum , affirmons-nous avec vantardise, mais nous ne sommes ni unis ni vraiment à l’aise dans notre diversité.
56: Mais dans les faits, la logique de la politique américaine a pris la direction inverse: le unum arraché à la diversité redit possible la survie au long terme de pluribus.
Divisés par la foi, la race et le sexe, par les classes sociales et les origines ethniques, par la géographie et l’économie, les Américains n’ont de foi en commun que celle de la communauté, que celle du public.
58: les Américains d’orignie hispanique ou asiatique ont fait preuve de moins de scepticisme, mais les Noirs, le groupe d’immigrants le plus ancien et le seul à être venu aux Etats-Unis conre son gré, est le moins persuadé que “notre” histoire puisse jamais être “leur” histoire.
62: Americains à trait-d’union: Nous travaillons à l’oubli, mais nous n’y réussissons pas toujours. Michael Walter n’est qu’un des ceux qui,nombreux, affirment que notre culture “natinale” est en fin de compte plurielle et que, dans l’immédiat, les Américains garderont leur trait d’union.
63:il se trouve en effet que l’histoire de l’amerique doit expliquer une identite composite qui melange l’imagerie assimilationniste du creuset (melting pot) structurée autour d’un patriotisme constitutinnel, avec, à la fois, une identité monoculturelle enracinée dans le protestantisme anglo-saxon et une identité multiculturelle qui est pluraliste et contradictoire.
Etre américain, c’est être un tout petit peu schizophrène, comme le démontre cet importun trait d’union qui identifie les racine pré-américaines de tant d’américains.
Même aujourd’hui, l’intérêt pourle multiculturalisme est bien moindre chez les immigrants les plus récents originaires d’Amérique centrale ou du Vietnam que chez les minorités présentes depuis longtemps sur le sol américain.
91: Le concept de nation américaine en tant qu’autoconstituée est particulièrement problématique. L’histoire est loin d’être finie. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de contempler (…)la triste histoire de la limitation de l’immigration entre 1924 et 1965 qui donna force de loi au sentiment ultra-nationaliste (nativist) qui était l’héritier de certaines tendances protestntes marginales du XIXe siècle tel le parti des Know-nothing (surnom du Parti Américain à l’époque ou il était encore une société secrète);
92…ou encore cette incapacité qui perdure pour les femmes et les Américains de couleur à arriver dans la pratique au rang économique et social que leur promet en théorie la citoyenneté.
96:La version contemporaine de ces questions est une reprise des débats des années 1960, mais aussi des années 1930, lorsque John Dewey et les avocats d’une éducation progressiste ouvrirent un débat fondamental sur le rôle de la liberté dans l’apprentissage du savoir.
98:Par exemple, bien que l’Ame désarmée exploite le sentiment réactionnaire qui flotte dans l’air du temps, c’est avant tout un livre qui raconte ce qui s’est passé à Cornell il y a vingt-cinq ans, lorsqu’Allan Bloom, alors jeune professeur de philosophie, vit avec horreur le monde réel de la race, des armes et du pouvoir empiéter sur son sanctuaire intellectuel.
(2)La génération qui, il y a vingt ans, défiait le corps professoral, est aujourd’hui le corps professoral, ou tout au moins, une partie influente de celui-ci. Les longs cheveux sont devenus gris, sont tombés ou ont été coupés, mais les idéaux qu’ils abritaient autrefois contienent à donner corps à des conférences de sociologie sur les cultures non-occidentales et à des séminaires de science politique qui explorent les idées de politique de l’environnement ou de révisonnisme dans la libération des femmes.
109:La political correctness est un terme inventé par des critiques conservateurs et des journalistes provocateurs pour dénier droit de cité à ceux qui s’inquiètent de la façon dont la parole peut refléter les relations de pouvoir. Il sert aussi à détourner l’attention des tristes réalités du racisme dans une société où les minorités sont très généralement privées de pouvoir, pour se placer plutôt sur le terrain de la disculpation d’une rhétorique absurde qui permet à une puissante majorité blanche (ou masculine ou hétérosexuelle ou chrétienne) de prétendre qu’elle est en fait le groupe menacé.
(2)Les conservateurs s’inquiètent des libertés que le département d’anglais de l’Université Yale prend avec la littérature, mais ils ne semblent pas remarquer que les départements d’anglais (tout comme ceux de philosophie, de littérature comparée, d’études noires ou féministes, où l’on trouve la minuscule minorité d’universitaires post-modernistes, féministes et non-blancs) sont presque toujours faibles et sous-financés en comparaison, par exemple, des départements d’informatique, de physique, d’économie ou de commerce; ou que Yale continue à produire des hommes blancs (et aussi quelques femmes) qui n’ont presque aucune difficulté à l’adapter à l’élite des professions américianes et à ses a priori culturels familiers; ou que la ville de New Haven (Connecticut), où se trouve Yale, a le plus haut taux de mortalité infantile des Etats-Unis et des rues dans lesquelles de jeunes Noirs s’entretuent régulièrement, assassinant aussi à l’occasion un étudiant blanc de Yale.
112: Mais la critique de la political correctness utilise de mauvais arguments qui pourraient eux-mêmes avoir des conséquences antidémocratiques. Elle met en effet les extrémistes révisionistes, qui cherchent à rendre la parole aux sans-pouvoir, dans le rôle de pollueurs de la neutralité et de l’impartialité.
123:C’est ce qu’ont si bien compris tous ceux qui appartiennent à cette gauche prétendument politically correct et multuculturelle qui refuse de croire q’une égalité formelle et une équité dans les procédures puisse jamais leur offrir une complète et substantielle égalité et une équité dans la réalité. Ils ne veulent pas être politically correct mais ils veulent corriger le déséquilibre politique de programmes universitaires soi-disant neutres. Ils voient des programmes traversés par des généralités et des universalités prétendues qui, en fait, ne contiennent que les écrits d’hommes anglo-américains et européens.
124: ntbp: Affirmative action: ensembles de mesures mises en place après l’adoption en 1964 par le Congrès de la loi sur les droits civiques et visant à favoriser, à qualification égale, l’embauche ou la promotion des minorités, par l’adhésion volontaire à des règles définies de concert avec les autorités judiciaires ou parfois par la mise en place de quotas. Cette pratique est violemment contestée parles milieux conservateurs qui en ont fait un cheval de bataille contre la gauche libérale.
152-153: Ainsi les Juifs en viennent-ils à penser qu’eux seuls peuvent comprendre l’Holocauste, les Noirs que les Blancs ne peuvent mettre en scène des films à thématiuqe noire, les Américains d’origine asiatique qu’un acteur occiental ne saurait jouer de façon crédible un personnage asiatique.
Dans cette vision étriquée, la difféence devient le seul insigne de l’identité et l’histoire commune de l’Amérique s’efface au profit d’une pléthore de contes particuliers de gens particuliers avec des histoires, des sexes, des races ou des préférences sexuelles particuliers.
153: Générateur dans le pays de scepticisme à l’égard de l’histoir emême de la nation et d’une fascination aveugle pour les cultures et les valeurs alternatives, l’hyperpluralisme laisse la génération qui va hériter des Etats-Unis à peine surnageant dans la diversité, la relativité culturelle et le doute corrosif, et p-153rivée de presque toute notion de communauté, ou encore de la valeur du besoin même de communauté.
165: Dans une société où personne ne lit, sauf si on l’y oblige, la b ataille de la cultrue -quelle qu’elle soit, est peut-être déjà percue. Quand la culture du ghetto et la culture des puissants sont toutews deux analsphabètes, quelle différence entre l’anglais « noir » et l’anglais « blanc ».
166:Une introduction à l’histoire américaine ou à la science politique devient un cauchemar pédagogique lorsque, dans un amphithéâtre de 400 étudiants, on compte 85 anciens élèves des écoles privées, 200 environ des écoles publiques )la plupart des villes et de leurs banlieues, mais quelques-uns de milieu rural), 40 adultes dont 15 personnes agées, et pratiquement 100 étudiants issus des minorités, dont la moitié arrivent avec des déficiences majeures dans leur formation mais un autre 20% représente le groupe arrvant largement en tête dans les tests, les Américains d’origine asiatique.
170: En d’autres termes, le multiculturalisme a des origines monoculturelles. En tant que société, l’Amérique est une tapisserie de peuples venus du monde entier, chacun avec la fierté de son histoire et ses racines culturelles. Il lui faut des programmes scolaires et universitaires à l’écoute de cette diversité et capables d’attirer des peuples marginalisés vers l’apprentissage du savoir. Mais, système constitutionnel offrant à ces peuples multiples un régime de tolérance démocratique, de pluralisme stable et de respect mutuel qui, dans la mesure où lidéal se raélise, peut protéger toutes les cultures qui le composent, l’Amérique possède une histoire culturelle propre, unique même.
175: De tous les conservateurs qui sont montés à l’assaut de la démocratie, Allan Bloom est celui qui puise au plus profond de la tradition philosophique pour étayer son argumentation. Aucun ouvrage équivalent n’a été aussi lu ou discuté en profondeur que l’Ame Désarmée . Bloom a fait veiller une Amérique soudain soucieuse des périls du relativisme et d’un postmodernisme agressif.
176: le terme de politically correct , ou PC, n’avait pas encore été inventé lorsque Bloom écrivit son libre, mais il n’est aucun des aspects les plus nocifs du concept qu’il n’ait anticipé.
(2)L’Ame Désarmée est le plus étonnant, le plus tentant, le plus subtil, le plus savant et le plus pervers des pamphlets, un exercice extraordinaire et ointu dans l’art du Mentir Noblement qui tente de persuader les Américains que la philosophie est supérieure à la vie ordinaire et que donc, l’enseignement universitaire devrait s’organiser autour del ‘édification du Petit Nombre qui incarne la philosophie plutôt qu’autour du Grand Nombre qui incarne la démocratie.
219: Un des compilateurs de doléances anti-jeunes les plus admirés, Dinesh D’Souza, l’auteur de Illiberal Education faisait partie de l’équipe d’agitateurs racistes de la Dartmouth Review, journal d’extrême droite financé par des capitaux extérieurs à l’université et donc participait à cette puérilité anarchique qu’il honnit aujourd’hui à des millions d’exemplaires.


Barber, Benjamin R. 1996. Djihad vs McWorld. Translated by Michel, Valois. Paris: Desclée de Brouwer.

7: Le multiculturalisme, la political correctness, les études consa- crées aux minorités raciales et aux femmes dans les universités ainsi que les controverses sur le “canon”, occupent aux Etats-Unis le devant de la scène plus que nulle part ailleurs. (les nations européennes) étaient des Etats-nations au sens où on l’entendait au XIXe siècle, avec une langue, une culture, une his- toire et une religion commune. Elles sont aujourd’hui de plus en plus multi culturelles. …l’expérience américaine du multiculturalisme, toujours contestée mais relativement réussie, mérite que les Européens lui consacrent quelque attention. 8: Qui plus est, l’interdépendance toujours plus importante en matière économique etde communications entre les différents pays du monde signifie que même les nations qui conservent une homogénéité interne doivent fonctionner dans un environnement global de plus en plus multiculture 9: les Américains ont conservé leur trait d’union, comme dans “Italo- Américain”,”Noir Américain”… 10: Aux Etats-Unis, les Noirs se demandent pourqoi ils devraient honorer une constitution républicaine qui les a condamnés à presque une siècle d’esclavage. 15: des millions d’immigrants votent chque année avec leurs pieds en venant habiter un pays où la moitié des électeurs ne se soucient guère de voter. L’Amérique, qui passe à l’étranger pour un parangon de la démocratie, semble souvent gouvernée par l’apathie et l’intérêt particulier. 16: notre identité se forge dans une relations dialectique à autrui, et elle est partie intégrante de la famille, de la tribu ou de la communauté. 21:…hystérie collective développée par les médias à propos de la political correctness 22: la plupart des livres publiés sur ce nouvel épisode de la crise chronique de notre système éducatif ont choisi de scinder la démocratie et l’éducationlDasns leur élan conservateur et antidémo- cratique, leurs auteurs -Allan Bloom (theClosing of the American Mind), Roger Kimball (Tenured Radicals), John Siber (Strait Shooting), Charles J. Sykes (Profscam) et Dinesh D’Souza (Illiberal Education)- associent tous la crise de l’éducationau progreesisme, à l’existence de professeurs gauchistes (radicals) et à un souci d’égalité (entre les étudiants, les cultures et les modèles pédagogiques). 23: Tandis que les enfants européens vont à l’école 240 jours par an, les jeunes Américains, à quelques exception près, se satisfont de 180 jours. 24: Les enseignants restent l’un des groupes les moins respectés et les moins payés aux Etats-Unis. 25: mais le but des écoles publiques n’est pas de donner des titres à ceux qui sont éduqués, mais d’éduquer ceux qui n’ont pas de titres. 26: Dans America Revised, qui étudie l’histoire des manuels d’histoire , Frances Fitzgerald offre une étonnante analyse de la manière dont, à mesure que changeaient modes et idéologies, les images ont été remo- delées. Bien avant que les Hispaniques et les Américians d’origine asiatique ne commencent à rivaliser avec les Indiens et les Noirs pour se faire une place dans l’hisoire américaine, des débats similaires ont opposé Anglais et Hollandias, puritans et libre- penseurs, fermiers et industriels, patrons et ouvriers, propritéaires d’esclaves et abolitionnistes, fédéralistes et anti-fédéralistes, américains “de souche” (c’est à dire arrivés l’an dernier) et “immi grants” (arrivés cette année), citadins et ruraux, unitaires et pluralistes, progres- sistes et conservateurs, et d’innombrables d’autres factions. 39: …manuels scolaires qui, d’une génération à l’autre, racontent des histoires différentes, voire contradictoires: “Nous ” sommes les Britanniques, transformés par l’Amérique. “Nous” sommes les puritains et les protestants qui luttons contre des vagues d’étrangers compa- rables à ceux que nous avons fuis dans l’Europe que nous avons laissés derrière nous, et qui sont catholiques, corrompus et inassimilables. “Nous ” sommes un cruset qui absorbe vague après vague de nouveaux venus originaires de culrtures étrangères et qui les assimile dans la culture américaine. “Nous ” somems une nation pluraliste d’immi- grants, une riche tapisserie de différences multiculturelles qui ne se fondent pas mais contiennent et embrassent desmondes variés. “Nous sommes une mosaïque dont la structure commune est constituée de morceaux séparés dont le carctère distinctif est essentiel à l’en- semble. “Nous ” sommes la grande majorité américaine, ceux qui ne sont pas propriétaires, les esclaves, les ofpprimés, les femmes, ceux qui ne sont pas blancs, les fermiers, les ouvriers, tous ceux que l’Amérique a exploités davantage qu’elle ne les a libérés et qu’elle a davantage trahis que soutenus par sa constituion théoriquement démocratique. Laquelle de ces hsoitres es t la nôtre? Cela dépend de quelle histoirede quelles histoires nous nous réclamons. L’hétérogénéité américaine fait que l’histoire des Etats-Unis, avec le temps, devient nécessairement plurielle, au sens où chaque généra- tion la réécrit et la confronte avec la réalité du pluralisme. Plus l’histoire est inclusive, plus sa trame est pluraliste. 41: D’un autre côté, si en réaction à cette orthodoxie à oeillères, l’histoire américaine n’est conçue que comme l’histoire d’une agression impérialiste et d’un génocide et, ainsi que le veulent certains tenats d’un révisionnisme radical, comme une histoire dont le seul but est l’exclusion, notre identité présente abandonne toute possibi- lité d’idéalisme et de justice.
52: …culture entièrement trournée vers le présent”
53: l’histoire américaine n’a peut-être jamais été aussi controversée qu’aujourd’hui, mais elle a toujours été plus controversée que les élites ne l’auraient souhaité. La perspective multuculturelle n’a de nouveau que le nom.54: l’Amérique a toujours été la tentive de peuples multiples de devenir un peuple, la recherche de l’unité dans la diversité et la pluralité.L’idée puriste d’une nation anglo-saxonne, blanche et prostestante (WASP) ne fut jamais que l’espoir péremptoire d’une partie de la popu- lation immigrante de l’Amérique. Ironiquement, lle survit aujourd’hui , princialement à l’état de cible de critiques cyniques.55: creuset ou patchwork ou? Nation unie ou tapisserie multicul- turelle? Terre vierge ou nation indienne?Terre de l’esclavage ou terre des braves (note: référence à l’hymne américain)?E pluribus unum , affirmons-nous avec vantardise, mais nous ne sommes ni unis ni vraiment à l’aise dans notre diversité.56: Mais dans les faits, la logique de la politique américaine a pris la direction inverse: le unum arraché à la diversité redit possible la survie au long terme de pluribus.Divisés par la foi, la race et le sexe, par les classes sociales et les origines ethniques, par la géographie et l’économie, les Améri- cains n’ont de foi en commun que celle de la communauté, que celle du public.58: les Américains d’orignie hispanique ou asiatique ont fait preuve de moins de scepticisme, mais les Noirs, le groupe d’immi- grants le plus ancien et le seul à être venu aux Etats-Unis contre son gré, est le moins persuadé que “notre” histoire puisse jamais être “leur” histoire.62: Americains à trait-d’union: Nous travaillons à l’oubli, mais nous n’y réussissons pas toujours. Michael Walter n’est qu’un des ceux qui, nombreux, affirment que notre culture “natinale” est en fin de compte plurielle et que, dans l’immédiat, les Américains garderont leur trait d’union.63:il se trouve en effet que l’histoire de l’amerique doit expliquer une identite composite qui melange l’imagerie assimilationniste du creuset (melting pot) structurée autour d’un patriotisme constitution- nel, avec, à la fois, une identité monoculturelle enracinée dans le protestantisme anglo-saxon et une identité multiculturelle qui est pluraliste et contradictoire.Etre américain, c’est être un tout petit peu schizophrène, comme le démontre cet importun trait d’union qui identifie les racine pré- américaines de tant d’américains.Même aujourd’hui, l’intérêt pourle multiculturalisme est bien moindre chez les immigrants les plus récents originaires d’Amérique centrale ou du Vietnam que chez les minorités présentes depuis longtemps sur le sol américain.91: Le concept de nation américaine en tant qu’autoconstituée est particulièrement problématique. L’histoire est loin d’être finie. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de contempler (…)la triste histoire de la limitation de l’immigration entre 1924 et 1965 qui donna force de loi au sentiment ultra-nationaliste (nativist) qui était l’héritier de certaines tendances protestntes marginales du XIXe siècle tel le parti des Know-nothing (surnom du Parti Américain à l’époque ou il était encore une société secrète);92…ou encore cette incapacité qui perdure pour les femmes et les Américains de couleur à arriver dans la pratique au rang économique et social que leur promet en théorie la citoyenneté.96:La version contemporaine de ces questions est une reprise des débats des années 1960, mais aussi des années 1930, lorsque John Dewey et les avocats d’une éducation progressiste ouvrirent un débat fon- damental sur le rôle de la liberté dans l’apprentissage du savoir. 98:Par exemple, bien que l’Ame désarmée exploite le sentiment réaction- naire qui flotte dans l’air du temps, c’est avant tout un livre qui raconte ce qui s’est passé à Cornell il y a vingt-cinq ans, lorsqu’Allan Bloom, alors jeune professeur de philosophie, vit avec horreur le monde réel de la race, des armes et du pouvoir empiéter sur son sanctuaire intellectuel.(2)La génération qui, il y a vingt ans, défiait le corps professoral, est aujourd’hui le corps professoral, ou tout au moins, une partie influente de celui-ci. Les longs cheveux sont devenus gris, sont tombés ou ont été coupés, mais les idéaux qu’ils abritaient autrefois contienent à donner corps à des conférences de sociologie sur les cultures non-occidentales et à des séminaires de science politique qui explorent les idées de politique de l’environnement ou de révision- nisme dans la libération des femmes.109:La political correctness est un terme inventé par des critiques conservateurs et des journalistes provocateurs pour dénier droit de cité à ceux qui s’inquiètent de la façon dont la parole peut refléter les relations de pouvoir. Il sert aussi à détourner l’attention des tristes réalités du racisme dans une société où les minorités sont très généralement privées de pouvoir, pour se placer plutôt sur le terrain de la disculpation d’une rhétorique absurde qui permet à une puissante majorité blanche (ou masculine ou hétérosexuelle ou chrétienne) de prétendre qu’elle est en fait le groupe menacé.(2)Les conservateurs s’inquiètent des libertés que le département d’anglais de l’Université Yale prend avec la littérature, mais ils ne semblent pas remarquer que les départements d’anglais (tout comme ceux de philosophie, de littérature comparée, d’études noires ou féministes, où l’on trouve la minuscule minorité d’universitaires post-modernistes, féministes et non-blancs) sont presque toujours faibles et sous-financés en comparaison, par exemple, des départements d’informatique, de physique, d’économie ou de commerce; ou que Yale continue à produire des hommes blancs (et aussi quelques femmes) qui n’ont presque aucune difficulté à l’adapter à l’élite des professions américianes et à ses a priori culturels familiers; ou que la ville de New Haven (Connecticut), où se trouve Yale, a le plus haut taux de mortalité infantile des Etats-Unis et des rues dans lesquelles de jeunes Noirs s’entretuent régulièrement, assassinant aussi à l’occa- sion un étudiant blanc de Yale.112: Mais la critique de la political correctness utilise de mauvais arguments qui pourraient eux-mêmes avoir des conséquences antidémo- cratiques. Elle met en effet les extrémistes révisionistes, qui cherchent à rendre la parole aux sans-pouvoir, dans le rôle de pollueurs de la neutralité et de l’impartialité.123:C’est ce qu’ont si bien compris tous ceux qui appartiennent à cette gauche prétendument politically correct et multuculturelle qui refuse de croire q’une égalité formelle et une équité dans les procé- dures puisse jamais leur offrir une complète et substantielle égalité et une équité dans la réalité. Ils ne veulent pas être politically correct mais ils veulent corriger le déséquilibre politique de programmes universitaires soi-disant neutres. Ils voient des programmes traversés par des généralités et des universalités prétendues qui, en fait, ne contiennent que les écrits d’hommes anglo-américains et européens.124: ntbp: Affirmative action: ensembles de mesures mises en place après l’adoption en 1964 par le Congrès de la loi sur les droits civiques et visant à favoriser, à qualification égale, l’embauche ou la promotion des minorités, par l’adhésion volontaire à des règles définies de concert avec les autorités judiciaires ou parfois par la mise en place de quotas. Cette pratique est violemment contestée par les milieux conservateurs qui en ont fait un cheval de bataille contre la gauche libérale.152-153: Ainsi les Juifs en viennent-ils à penser qu’eux seuls peuvent comprendre l’Holocauste, les Noirs que les Blancs ne peuvent mettre en scène des films à thématiuqe noire, les Américains d’origine asiatique qu’un acteur occiental ne saurait jouer de façon crédible un personnage asiatique.Dans cette vision étriquée, la difféence devient le seul insigne de l’identité et l’histoire commune de l’Amérique s’efface au profit d’une pléthore de contes particuliers de gens particuliers avec des histoires, des sexes, des races ou des préférences sexuelles particu- liers.153: Générateur dans le pays de scepticisme à l’égard de l’histoir emême de la nation et d’une fascination aveugle pour les cultures et les valeurs alternatives, l’hyperpluralisme laisse la génération qui va hériter des Etats-Unis à peine surnageant dans la diversité, la relativité culturelle et le doute corrosif, et p-153rivée de presque toute notion de communauté, ou encore de la valeur du besoin même de communauté.165: Dans une société où personne ne lit, sauf si on l’y oblige, la b ataille de la cultrue -quelle qu’elle soit, est peut-être déjà percue. Quand la culture du ghetto et la culture des puissants sont toutews deux analsphabètes, quelle différence entre l’anglais « noir » et l’anglais « blanc ».166:Une introduction à l’histoire américaine ou à la science politique devient un cauchemar pédagogique lorsque, dans un amphithéâtre de 400 étudiants, on compte 85 anciens élèves des écoles privées, 200 environ des écoles publiques )la plupart des villes et de leurs ban- lieues, mais quelques-uns de milieu rural), 40 adultes dont 15 per- sonnes agées, et pratiquement 100 étudiants issus des minorités, dont la moitié arrivent avec des déficiences majeures dans leur formation mais un autre 20% représente le groupe arrvant largement en tête dans les tests, les Américains d’origine asiatique.170: En d’autres termes, le multiculturalisme a des origines monocul. turelles. En tant que société, l’Amérique est une tapisserie de peuples venus du monde entier, chacun avec la fierté de son histoire et ses racines culturelles. Il lui faut des programmes scolaires et universitaires à l’écoute de cette diversité et capables d’attirer des peuples marginalisés vers l’apprentissage du savoir. Mais, système constitutionnel offrant à ces peuples multiples un régime de tolérance démocratique, de pluralisme stable et de respect mutuel qui, dans la mesure où lidéal se raélise, peut protéger toutes les cul- tures qui le composent, l’Amérique possède une histoire culturelle propre, unique même.175: De tous les conservateurs qui sont montés à l’assaut de la démocratie, Allan Bloom est celui qui puise au plus profond de la tradition philosophique pour étayer son argumentation. Aucun ouvrage équivalent n’a été aussi lu ou discuté en profondeur que l’Ame Désarmée . Bloom a fait veiller une Amérique soudain soucieuse des périls du relativisme et d’un postmodernisme agressif.176: le terme de politically correct , ou PC, n’avait pas encore été inventé lorsque Bloom écrivit son libre, mais il n’est aucun des aspects les plus nocifs du concept qu’il n’ait anticipé.(2)L’Ame Désarmée est le plus étonnant, le plus tentant, le plus subtil, le plus savant et le plus pervers des pamphlets, un exercice extraordinaire et ointu dans l’art du Mentir Noblement qui tente de persuader les Américains que la philosophie est supérieure à la vie ordinaire et que donc, l’enseignement universitaire devrait s’organiser autour del ‘édification du Petit Nombre qui incarne la philosophie plutôt qu’autour du Grand Nombre qui incarne la démocratie.219: Un des compilateurs de doléances anti-jeunes les plus admirés, Dinesh D’Souza, l’auteur de Illiberal Education faisait partie de l’équipe d’agitateurs racistes de la Dartmouth Review, journal d’extrême droite financé par des capitaux extérieurs à l’université et donc participait à cette puérilité anarchique qu’il honnit aujourd’ hui à des millions d’exemplaires

Barber, B. (2007). Consumed: How Markets Corrupt Children, Infantilize Adults and Swallow Citizens Whole, W.W. Norton and Company.

5: On the potency of adolescent culture, liberals and conservatives agree. Writes Robert J. Samuelson, a moderate liberal:”We live in an age when people increasingly refuse to act their age. The young (or many of them) yearn to be older, while the older (or many of them) yearn to be younger.
7: infantilization -not second childhood but enduring childishness – is much more than just a mesmeric metaphor. A new cultural ethos is being forged that is intimately associated with global consumerism. Those responsible for manufacturing and merchandizing goods for the global marketplace, those who are actually researching, teaching and practicing marketing and advertising today are aiming both to sell to a younger demographic and to imbue older consumers with the tastes of the young.
8: Meanwhile the young are big spenders way before they are even modest earners.
10: “Corrupt” and “inefficent” Third World governments are punished; the kids starve, fall ill, and die. In war and poverty, in natural disaster and man-made genocide, they are most often the first victims and the last to benefit from capitalism’s otherwise voracious appetite for consumers.
33: The misuse of normative terms like autonomy and empowerment to rationalize selling to children far too young to possess either liberty or judgment (the two key components of real choice or self-determiing power) is typical of an infantilist ethos that reinforces consumer market ideology by providing corporate predators with an altruistic ethic to rationalize selfish and patently immoral ends.
38-39: At the beginning of the sixteen century (…) two great waves of change swept across Europe. The first was protestantism: (…)cleansing spirit of ascetiscism in the face of a corrupt and worldly Catholic Church. The second was capitalism, (…) a new gospel of entrepreneurship and prosperity in the face of a stagnating feudal economy and a rigid mercantile ideology (…).
When (…) the Puritans sailed for America, they took with them this powerful cultural ideology manifesting the new ethos -this fresh and vibrant ethic capable of assuaging the yearning soul even as it succored the striving body.
41: Much of the pop cultural literature apes Puriasnism’s mood even as it debases its currency. It preaches sobriety (twelve-step programs) while encouraging indulgence (advertising and marketing), calls for temperance of character (conservative cultural critics), even as it molds behavior into a consumerist mold (conservative support for market capitalism.
42: In the new gospel of consumption, spending is holy, as saving was holy in the traditional gospel of investment.
65-66: WEBER’S RATIONAL CAPITALISM.
CALCULATING INVESTOR AND PRUDENT BOOKKEEPERS
Jacob “The Rich” Fugger: At the very moment in 1517 when Martin Luther was pinning his ninety-five theses on the doors of Wittenberg Cathedral, Jacob Fugger (“Jakob der Reich” or Jacob the Rich) was deploying a family forture that came to rival and then surpass that of the Medicis (who controlled the Renaissance supercity Florence) on the way to domeinging Europe from Rome and Madrid to London and Vienna, casting its shadow across the widening world as far as Chile, Peru, and the Orient.(…) Jacob Fugger was using his fortune to help the Papacy sell pardons -the Fuggerei, and institution conceived by Jacob in 1505 that survives into the modern days as both the oldest continuing settlement house in the world, and a landmark in the development of the idea of charitable activity as a responsibility of great wealth. “Gain, save, and give”, which was to become John Wesley’s Methoist gospel, seemed already to be permeating Jacob Fugger’s Catholic soul.
77: We can be glad Carnegie built libraries, glad that the Gateses are battling AIDS, but inequality will not end because billionaires give back some of the spoils of monopoly.
116: As the Protestant ethos once shaped a culture conducive to work and investment, the infantilist ethos today shapes a culture conducinve to laxity, shopping, and spending.
210: Still more recently, English paywrite Tom Stoppard, reflecting on middle Europe under the communitsts, has observed that it was far easier to feel free in composing samzdat works of protest against a communist regime than in composing uncontested works of dissidence in a free brougeois society where anything goes, praise or protest, as long as it earns a profit. Vàclav Havel, the Czech Republic’s theater guru cum president, has drawn similar conculsions based on his experience as poet and politician.
Yet a historically appropriate theory of liberal rights useful in freeing men from Tyranny is not so easily converted into a theory of civic participation useful in justifying democracy and grounding justice in societies hat have long been free, at least in the formal legal sense.
(…)
But nowadays, the idea that only private persons are free, and that only personal choices fo the kind consumers make count as autonomous turns out to be an assault not on tyranny but on democracy.
125: Tocqueville was worried about tyranny of the majority that could be associated with democracy, but hte psychological reality he captured beings with the fact that constraint itself is aimed not a tthe free body but the liberated consciousness. The modern typrant hopes to impede our aims, divert our purposes, and refurmulate our goals. He is not the democratic majority or the public good, he is the enforcer of consumer capitalism’s need to sell. His instrument is not the sate but the very market about whose vaunted liberty he boasts.
132:  In the arena of education (…), the defects of public schooling are thoughts to be remediated by the virtues of parental choice.(…)
What do we get? The incomplete satisfaction of those private wants through a fragmented system in which individuals secede from the public realm, undermining the public system to which we can subsribe in common. Of course no one really wants a country defined by deep educational injustice and the surrender of a public and civic pedagogy whose absence will ultimately impact even our own private choices. (…)Yet aggregating our private choices as educational consumers in fact yields an inegalitarian and highly segmented society in which the least advantaged are further disadvantaged as the wealthy retreat ever further from the public sector. As citizens, we would never consciously select such an outcome, but in practice what is good for “me”, the educational consumer, turns out to be a disaster for “us” as citzense and civic educators -and thus for me the denizen of an American commons (or what’s left of it).
135: We mutter our wan complaints about a violent and salacious pop culture, even as wecount its economic blessings and (with a wink) enjoy its enticing products.
145: Parks, schools, and other formerly public institutions find it difficult to withstand commercialization. (…) Park users may welcome the improvements, and write off the advertising as a necessary cost; but the cost is “necessary” only because private users refuse as citizens to pay and appropriate taxes (the way the French do, for example) to keep up the parks publicly.
166-167: Capitalism in its late consumer phase, preoccupied with selling goods to cusomers who may never need nor desire what is for sale, is well served neither by the forms of identity embodied in the Protestant ethos, nor by the cultural identity politics of the last forty years. Hence, consumerism has attached itself to a novel identity politics in which business itself plays a role in forging identities conducive to bying and selling. Identity here becomes a reflection of “lifestyles” that are closely associated with commercial brands and the products they label, as well as with attitutdes and behaviors linked to where we shop, how we buy, and what we eat, wear and consume.
167-168:the course of the 1970s and 1980s, these new commercial identities have been to some degree generationally defined by a succession of time periods with commercial signatures. The postwar baby-boomer generation was defined by the fecundity of its defining reproductivity, but in time it reappeared in a language that defined its critical relationship to culture and consumerism- the “spoiled” Sixties generation known variously as “hippies”, the “Woodstock generation”, and “flower children”. These earlier generational categories at least referred to cultural attitudes and behaviors or demographic facturs (the “counterculture”). The following generation went temporarily unnamed, but it was eventually dubbed Gen X, it found itself defined more by commerce than by culture. Pointing to those low-birthrate offspring of the 1960s who some called self-indulgent slackers, it actually defined a generation that in cultural historian Paul Fussell’s description wanted to “hop off the merry-go-round of status, money and social climbing” that had characterized the baby boomers of the previous generatin. Gen Y succeeded Gen X and was intended to portray a generation almost entirely in terms of consumption. (…). In Japan, GenXers have been called the “thumb generation” -because those under twenty-five are defined not by the “content of their character” but by their affinity for mobile text-messaging by thumb (…). In India, young entrepreneurs identify themselves as “Zippies” (…)
168-169: These evolving demographic caategories quickly found their advertising counterparts in explicitly commercial slogans such as “the Pepsi generation” or “the Wired generation”, or by association with strong lifestyle brands(…). Branding also comes via surrogate identity television shows such as Cheers (…); Sex and the City (…), The Sopranos (…) and Desperate Housewives.
213: In the first decade of the new millenium, consumers find themselves trapped in a cage of infantilization, reinforced by privatization and an identity politics -call it an identity antipolitics- of branding.
214: Consumers are not citzens, and when a system pretends that they are, peculiar and even perverse things happen to decision making and to democracy, as well as democracy’s commitment to diversity.
(…)
The Enlightenment had created workds of liberty, privacy and tolerance unknown to earlier societies. The new liberal ideologies that helped emancipate eighteenth-century men and women were oppositional (their targets were absolute monarchy and an authoritarian church).
216: The new culture industry, purveying the myth of what I have called consumer empowerment, claimed
That standards were based in the first place on consumer’s needs…(a)circle of manipulation and retroactive need in which the unity of the system grows ever stronger”(Adorno, T. W. and H. M. . (2002). Dialectic of Enlightenment. Stanford, Stanford UP. p. 121)
260-261: Changes will come from the inside out but also from the oustide in, much as a successful therapy does. It will require action by reengaged citizens as well as by resisting consumers. The restoration of a healthy pluralism in which human values are multiple and material consumption but one in a a cornucopia of human behaviors will in fact quite precisely require a social therapy that treats our defining civic schizophrenia -a civic therapy that restores the balance between private and public, giving our public civic selves renewed sovereignty over our private consumer selves and putting the fate of citizens ahead of the fate of market. This involves both a restoration of capitalism to its primary role as an efficient and productive way of meeting real economic needs, from supply (or push) back to demand (or pull), and a restoration of the democratic public as the sovereghn regulator of our plural life worlds -of which the marketplace is just one among equals.
261: (Forms of Resistance worth exploring) These dialectical reactions include three quite specifically cultural responses to consumerism that grow out of consumerism itself. I will discuss them under the rubrics cultural creolization, cultural carnivalization and cultural jamming. They include two market-side responses that pursue public goods in privatge market ways, namely the twin strategy of corporate citizenship and civic consumerism, discussed in the final chapter.

Barber, B. (2010). America’s knowledge deficit. The Nation. New York. (see my own post)

Going into midterm Congressional elections that he knew wouldn’t turn out to his liking, President Obama complained that politics was tough because “facts and science and argument” do not “seem to be winning the day all the time.” He was echoing President Clinton and others who have complained that voters know more about football than political issues and, with their minds made up, can’t be “bothered with the facts.” In 2004 John Kerry voiced the same worry: “Facts, science, truth seem to be significantly absent from what we call our political dialogue.” In a New York Times “Week in Review” essay reminding us of these complaints the Sunday before the election, Peter Baker notes that many observers saw them as “elitist”—the seeming disdain of politicians for the intelligence of ordinary voters. But the real story is less about elitism or the new know-nothingism than about democracy and what I want to suggest is a novel and treacherous epistemological deficit. We already know too many Americans know rather too little. A recent Pew survey confirmed that the religious are often “profoundly ignorant about religion”—above all, their own. At least in the survey, one’s level of education was a predictor of knowledge. Not so in other domains. College students remain woefully ignorant about history and geography; year in and year out, many of my students cannot place the Civil War in the right century or Iraq on the right continent. And our beleaguered president knows all too well that 20 percent of his fellow citizens—up from 11 percent two years ago—insist he is a Muslim, and more than 25 percent doubt he was born in the United States. Not to mention all those Americans who believe 9/11 conspiracy theories (Bush did it! The CIA did it!) or that extraterrestrials hijack people (as of last year, a New England support group for abductees claimed a growing membership of 1,500). But it is not what Americans don’t know that is so pernicious to our democracy (they can always be educated); it is that they don’t know what knowing actually is. Standing in the background of Obama’s and Kerry’s complaints, as well as of our radical political polarization and the multiplication of candidates (some of whom won on November 2) making preposterous claims about witchcraft, stem cell research, headless bodies in the desert, climate change, creationism and Islam-as-inherently-evil, is this debilitating civic deficit.
We hear about the democratic deficit all the time, but it is the epistemological deficit that is putting democracy at risk. Epistemology signifies the “science of knowing” and expresses a civilizational conviction that truth, objectivity, science, fact and reason are fundamentally different from opinion, subjectivity, prejudice, feeling and irrationality. The science of knowing insists on the fundamental distinction made by the Greeks between episteme (true knowledge) and doxa (opinion or prejudice, a root of our word “orthodoxy”). The Greeks understood that there is a potent difference between knowledge claims rooted in reason, or in facts that reflect some version of a real or objective world, and the subjective opinions by which we advertise our personal prejudices. We may not always be able to agree on what counts as real knowledge rather than mere prejudice, but we can and must agree on the criteria by which the distinction is made. Indeed, our science, our society and our democratic culture depend on the distinction. Knowledge as episteme denotes claims that can be backed up by facts, good reasons and sound arguments. This doesn’t mean there is perfect truth, but it does mean there are good and bad arguments—claims that can be verified by empirical facts or rooted in logically demonstrable arguments and those that cannot be. Because democracy relies on words rather than force, reason rather than compulsion and an agreement about the value if not the substance of objectivity, it works only when we agree on the distinction between knowledge and opinion, between claims that can be verified by facts and validated by sound reasoning and subjective personal beliefs that, however deeply felt, are incapable of being corroborated or falsified. There are those who will say that democracy is simply government by the people, smart or dumb, knowledgeable or ignorant. But democracy is government by citizens, and citizenship is defined by education, deliberation, judgment and the capacity to find common ground. This is the difference between democracy as mob rule and democracy as deliberative civic engagement. Mob rule asks only for the expression of prejudice and subjective opinion. Democracy demands deliberative judgment. Yet far too many Americans, including not just many of the new Tea Party politicians but established leaders like former President George W. Bush, honestly think the difference between, say, evolution and creationism is merely a matter of opinion: you think man is descended from the apes; I think he is a creature made by God. Two competing belief systems, two forms of personal conviction equally salient. Tolerance, to Bush, means we respect both views and acknowledge their common creditability, because, after all, we both feel deeply about the matter—which means, in turn, we teach both views in our schools. * * * The trouble is that when we merely feel and opine, persuaded that there is no possible way our opinion can be controverted or challenged, having an opinion is the same as being “right.” Being right quickly comes to trump being creditable and provable, and we lose the core democratic faculty of admitting that we might be wrong, and that our views must be judged by some criterion other than how deeply we hold them. Our polarizedantidemocratic politics of personal prejudice is all about the certainty that we are right paired with the conviction that nothing can change our mind. Yet democracy is wholly contrary to such subjective certainty. To secure our liberty in a world of collectivity, we must remain endlessly sensitive to the possibility that we might be wrong. And hence to our reciprocal willingness to subject our opinions to corroboration—and to falsification. We teach evolution not because it is “true” in some absolute sense but because it is susceptible to falsification. Creationism is not, which is why evolution is science while creationism is subjective opinion—a fit candidate for belief but inappropriate to schooling. There are, of course, many issues that cannot be judged by empirical evidence or objective truth. The existence of God is one of them; the nature of justice is another. These are normative rather than empirical claims. But even in the realm of politics, where we lack empirical evidence and must argue normative opinions, there are good and bad arguments, claims that are more persuasive because they are more reasonable. The Greeks used to say “right opinion” (orthodoxia). Aristotle was especially alert to the need for a kind of practical wisdom in the political sphere, when episteme was not available. He called it phronesis and was at pains to distinguish it from mere opinion. Phronesis is not yet episteme or true knowledge but is more than mere prejudice and gives politics its relative objectivity and capacity for consensus. None of this means science is “absolutely true” or that belief is false. But what is true is that science is falsifiable and belief is not. When as an evolutionist I claim man is descended from apes and their historical/biological predecessors, I am claiming something that can be corroborated or falsified by reference to fossil records, genetic affinities, geology and other kinds of empirical data and testable hypotheses. When I claim God created man and then woman from a rib of man, there is no way to confirm or falsify the claim, no “evidence” that can counter what is a subjective belief. One claim invokes science and the possibility of rational agreement; the other, limited to incommensurable subjective beliefs, does not and may provoke violence and war. Since democracy requires that we agree (or disagree) about facts, policies and outcomes, we must have criteria by which we can rationally agree or disagree about such things. We need science not just to make sense of the world and subordinate it to our purposes but to sustain our freedom. If I claim there is no such thing as global warming (or man-made warming), I must be able to point to data and arguments that you can inspect and judge. I must be able to detach my arguments from my interests. The fact that I profit from oil sales, for example, is not a reason to argue that fossil-fuel use does not cause warming. Conversely, the fact that I benefit from alternative energy technology is not a reason to say warming is real. There must be evidence that is convincing to investors both in fossil fuel and in alternative energy. Yet what has happened to American democracy is that we have substituted opinion and prejudice for science and reason—or, worse still, no longer recognize the difference between them. Larry King can thus interview both bigger-than-life cosmologist Stephen Hawking and a psychic-for-hire who talks to the dead in a way that suggests there is nodifference in their methods. Ghost stories can appear on the History Channel next to World War II documentaries. And candidates can say just about anything impulse dictates, confident that their constituents will have neither an authoritative basis on which to judge nor any reason to think they need one. As Obama learned, many Americans are likely to associate a call for “proof”—for epistemological authority—with “elitism” and suggest that pushing “knowledge” is less a common way to put ourselves in the service of reason than someone’s private way of announcing his own supposed superiority. The great African-American author James Baldwin once said, “People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction.” Many Americans seem to have turned reality itself into a set of television shows utterly detached from reality. Daniel Boorstin, a former Librarian of Congress, wrote, “We risk being the first people in history to have been able to make their illusions so vivid, so persuasive, so ‘realistic’ that they can live in them. We are the most illusioned people on earth.” The tyranny most corrosive to democracy is not the tyranny of money but the tyranny of illusion. As Chris Hedges says in his book Empire of Illusion, “A populace deprived of the ability to separate lies from truth, that has become hostage to the fictional semblance of reality put forth by pseudo-events, is no longer capable of sustaining a free society.” The November 2 elections were many things: a manifestation of anger and resentment, a tribute to citizen organization, a demonstration of protest politics, an invitation to polarization and a proof of the enduring role of money in politics. But they also offered distressing evidence of our emerging epistemological deficit—a long, destructive erosion of our Enlightenment faith in reason and reasoning and of our willingness to recognize that facts and good arguments must prevail if freedom is to survive. The elections sent a lot of politicians home, but the real loser was democracy.

Barber, B. (2009). Interdependence Day. Art, Religion, and the City in the Developing World of Interdependence, Istanbul.

Barber, B. (2010). Interdependence Day Report. SUSTAIN/Ability (in climate, culture and civil society), Berlin.
http://www.civworld.org/web/Benjamin_Barber_Berlin_Report.pdf

___ (2012). Interdependence Day. 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence, Los Angeles.

(hip hop and korean performances) reason for meeting in LA. Multilingual and remarkably diverse part of LA. Group belong to the Korean Church. We,, Interdpendent believe that we live in a neighbourhood if we want to survive politically.
Philadelphia, Rome, Paris, Casa, Mexico, Brussels, Istambul, Berlin and LA…
We are on the tragic site of the dispicable assassination of Robert Kennedy which has now become a site for education,
Through music and culture we can achieve a more egalitarian society.
The face of this nation looks much more like McArthur park than higher status parts of the cities.
Politicians are the toughest sell regarding interdependence while the rest of society (business, religious leaders, artists) understands and adopts it.
Our country will survive only if we live together!

Paul Shrade speech in the Coconut Grove. which was the night club of the then Ambassador Hotel. Each seat is in the care of a group of student. Tells about the School history. Now hosts 5 schools. We ought to be putting more money into education is his reply to the detractors complaing about the high costs of building this site.
John and Robert did so much building interdependence. This programme today should be supported.

Liz Levitt Hirsch: Ben is inspiring, community gathering place, exactly of what we are doing at the Levitt Pavilion. We bring culture from all over the world “all the world is on stage at McArthur Park” (LA Time). Music is the universal language. I am in alignment with the values of IDDay!
6 years ago, walking in this neighbourhood would have been just impossible. Unutilized forgotten places.

Aileen Adams: I’m here to provide an official welcome on behalf of the mayor who gasps interdependence. if we are going to create great solution, it is through interdependence. Such a tragic place is now a place for education for tomorrow’s leader.
McArthur provides a city treasure.
Interdence movement couldn’t have found a more diverse place 36% foreign born city, 2nd largest population after capitals for Mexican, Japanese, Korean, Philipino populations …we are a city where the world truly gets together.
Cyclovia is a great example of how you can learn from one another. We borrowed this idea from Bogota.
We export our Summer night lights in neighbourhood considered dangerous.
Personal statement: I have learned life’s most important lesson when I visited Rwanda and the program each one take one (adopting orphans), Women in politics, in peace keeping corps, in police in developing countries…here in LA we are about to have an all-male city council. We need to come together to deal with all the major issues. Education.

___P. Schrade, et al. (2012). Welcome address, opening remarks. 10th Interdependence Day: Culture, Justice and the Arts in the Age of Interdependence. Los Angeles.

States are defined by what keeps them apart.
It’s not the States but the city doing the heavy lifting. At the Copenhagen Summit, States failed, but Mayors from all over the world gathered by the Mayor of Copenhagen set to work. It was a city-to-city intelligence gathering.


Barnett, David, and Pru Goward. 1997. John Howard, Prime Minister.

Barry, Brian. (1991), ‘Self-government revisited’, Democracy and power: essays in political theory, Oxford

Barth, Frederik. (1969), Ethnic groups and boundaries. (Boston: Little Brown).

Batterbee, K. (2010). Expectations mismatch in multiple-language polities. In Law, I. A. o. L. a. (ed.) 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law: “Language, Law and the Multilingual State”. Bloemfontein: Free StateUniversity.

My notes: 2008 committee or Nortwest Legislative Assembly (half of them aboriginals) held hearings in their communities regarding the quinquennial review of the Official Languages Act of 2003….Canada has a complex language policy management situation. 10 provinces (can handle language policy). 3 territories(have to implement Federal language legislation). North West territories. Half population is aboriginal.1988 Official languages Act:intended to make sure that the rights of French were recognized under federal law across Canada. Yukon agreed. Northwest territories, on the basis of its 85% inuktitut speaking population, didn’t. 1990, Official Languages Act in the Northwest territory 6 indigenous languages…now 9 ! During a hearing , the wish expressed was  that Weledeh should be recognized as an Official language of the Northwest Territories.From a linguistic point of view, Weledeh isn’t enough a variety to be called a distinct language.38% of the population speak an aboriginal language in the NWTerritories. in the cities numbers decrease considerably.Explicitely the reason is access to public funding. Implicitely, it’s jealousy from other aboriginal groups.
Batterbee created the Rights&Obligation instrument. What rights are givento whomfor what languages in what situation and domainswhat obligtion are directly imposed, on whom, for what languages, in what situation?check the website of the official NWTerritories:English or french can be used in a courtany official language can be used by any personInterpretation services can be made available to the public in certain circumstances.Recommendation: that the existing act be repealed to get away from the federal model of legislation. Need a service delivery model. Official languages act didn’t deliver!

Baron, Dennis. 1991. The English-Only Question: An Official Language for Americans?: Yale University Press.

Baubock, Rainer. 1994. Transnational Citizenship: Membership and Rights in Transnational Migration. Aldershot: Edward Elgar.

Bauer, Alain. 2003. Laicité, mode d’emploi: les pouvoirs publics face à l’offensive des communautarismes. Le Figaro, 17 novembre 2003, 15.

Bauer est l’ancien grand maître du grand orient de France
Voici le moments des postures et des incantations politques revenues. La multiplication des laiques de circonstances, de tout bord, pourrait apparaître comme une bonne nouvelles pour celles et ceux qui, depuis toujours, défendent une laicité républicaine. Il n’en est rien.
On peut avoir légitimement peur de la profusion de signes religieux, pas seulement musulmans, dans les étabissements scolaires, ou des contraintes imposées dans les piscines ou établissements de soins, aux femmes se retrouvant dans une certaine pratique de la foi musulmane.
Pour autant, passer d’un extrême, le délitement volontaire des principes laiques depujis 50 ans, à un autre, une pseudo-laicité du rejet, ne peut pas apparaître comme un progrès. Cette régression, cette réacton, est d’abord, le plus souvent le signe de la peur. Il est d’ailleurs significatif de constater qu’en quelques lignes, on passe de l’expression d’une législation contre “les signes religieux et politiques” à la révélation du fond véritable: “une loi conre le voile”. Entendre le message des enseignants, des soignants, des élus, des citoyens confrontés à la manifestation publique d’un mouvement lontemps souterrain, est nécesaire. Trouver les moyens de répondre à ce questionnement est indispensable. Favoriser les extrémismes religieux de toutes origines, souvent subventionnés pour des raisons qu’on n’ose assumer, serait la pire des attaques contre la laicité.
La laicité n’est pas revancharde. Il ne s’agit pas, ou plus, de venger l’échec de 1983 et de la tentative de mise en place du grand service public unifié de l’éducation nationale. Il est temps de poser les termes du débat et d’affirmer la loi de 1905 comme base du règelement des problèmes qui se posent, par le dialogue, l’autroité de la République et le refus de l’exclusion ou de la création d’un enseignement privé encore plus communautarisé dont on se demandera avec effroi, dans 15 ou 20 ans, par quel aveugement, on a pu laisser se créer un tel monstre.
Il est sans doute nécessaire de corriger les effets de la loi de 1989 sur les droits des lycéens en affirmant l’interdiction de tout signe politique, religieux ou autre dans l’espace scolaire (tout en se posant quelques questions sur les modes opératoires d’un tel texte face au keffieh ou à l’abus de système pileux…). La France n’est pas (encore) la Turquie. Mais on ne pourra faire l’économie d’une réflexion sur la sanction en trouvant le moyen de ne pas exclure mais de convaincre. La révision du système disciplinaire de l’éducation nationale s’imposerait également.
Afffirmer que ce dispositif dans le service public nécessite de poser les termes du contrat avec le secteur éducatif privé, notamment sur la définition, en core inconne, du “caractère propre”.
De ce point de vue, l’effet pervers de l’exxclusion qui permettrait la mise en place d’un no9uvel espace scolaire de substitution n’est pas admissible. On en pourra faire l’économie d’une application globale du texte, tout en évitant que4lques confusions honteuses comme l’autorisaiton d’ouvrir des classes dans des édifices religieux.
Trouver les moyens de régler par la même occasion quelques “curiosités” historiques comme le statut de la Guyane (qui salarie les représentant d’un seul culte), de la Polynésie française, de Wallis-et-Futuna (qui n’appliquent pas la loi de 1905) comme cela a été réalisé pour le statut civil des femmes à Mayotte cette année constituerait un progrès considérable pour la Répub lique et celles et ceux qui en défendent les valeurs.
Enfin, au delà du débat complexe sur le concordat en Alsace Moselle, système suranné et obsolète qu’il faudrai un jour véritablement aborder, la suppression de l’obligation de dérogation imposée aux familles qui ne souhaitent pas que leurs enfants suivent le catéchisme obligatoire d’une des 5 églises “reconnues” permettrait d’aligner la situation locale sur les considerations utiles du Conseil constitutionnel quant à l’apprentissage de la langue corse.
Il n’est pas possible, à quelques mois du centenaire de la loi de 1905, que le gouvernement n’a toujours pas décider de célébrer, de transformer la laicité française en instrument de guerre contre un seul culte.
Depuis 1928 et la création de la Mosquée de Paris, la République respecte le libre choix des citoyens quant à leurs croyances, tout en garantissant un espace public qui se refuse à s’aligner sur une, ou plusieurs , “religions d’Etat”. La loi de séparation est d”abord une loi de liberté contre toute imposition d’un culte obligatoire. Les laiques sont les défenseurs d’une école qui forme des citoyens libres, pas d’une usine de reproduction du pareil au même. Le courage n’est pas de céder à la facilité d’une prise de position d’un instant mais de créer les conditions d’une laicité aux couleurs de la république.
(,,,)
On dit souvent que les derniers des convertis sont souvent les pires des croyants. Il semblerait que les conversions laiques spontanées relèvent du meme esprit.
La voie de la liberté et de l’émancipation pourrait ainsi passer par une modificatoin du Code de l’éducation nationale renforçant les dispositions des règlements intérieurs sur les tenues vestimentaires en leur conférant la force de la loi, tout en soulignant l’obligtion du dialogue. Ce dispositif pouvant être décliné sur l’ensemble du secteur public et sous cntrat, non seulement éducatif mais également sanitaire et social. L’obligation faite aux personnels publics (…) pouvant également être rappelée plus fortement.
C’est en utilisant la loi de 1905, en corrigeant les inteprétations erronées de textes instables, en mettant fin aux errements d’un demi-siècle de délitement de la laicité française, qu’il semble possible d’avancer sans donner des armes aux extrémistes de tout bord qui, usurpant les valeurs de la République, cherchent en fait à l’affaiblir.

Baugh, A., and T. Cable. 1993. A History of the English Language. 4th ed. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Baugh, John. 1983. Black Street Speech: its history, structure and Survival. Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press.

Baugh, John. 1988. Language and Race: Some Implications for Linguistic Science. In Linguistics: The Cambridge Survey, edited by F. Newmeyer. Cambridge: Cambridge University.

reference from Baugh, J. (1999). Out of the Mouths of Slaves: African American Language and Educational Malpractice. Austin, Texas, University of Texas Press. in the chapt.8 on Changing Terms of Self-reference among American Slave Descendants

Baugh, John. 1993. Black Street Speech. Austin, Texas: University of, Texas Press.

Baugh, John. 1997. What’s in a name? That by Which We Call the Linguistic Consequences of the African Slave Trade. The quarterly of the National Writing Project (19):9.

reference from Baugh, J. (1999). Out of the Mouths of Slaves: African American Language and Educational Malpractice. Austin, Texas, University of Texas Press. in the chapt.8 on Changing Terms of Self-reference among American Slave Descendants

Baugh, John. 1998. Linguistic, Education, and the Law: Educational Reform for African-American Language Minority Students. In African-American English: Structure, History and Use, edited by S. S. Mufwene, J. R. Rickford, G. Bailey and B. John. London: Routledge.

283: The “case” referred to -the 1979 Ann Arbor case argued before Justice Joiner has come to be known as the Black English Trial. Eleven African American plaintiffs had been placed in remedial special education classes based on pathological linguistic evaluation that failed to take into account their linguistic heritage as speakers of African-American vernacular English (AAVE). Although Justice Joiner ruled in favor of the plaintiffs, he did so based on the issue of “teacher training” and left the matter of “linguistic classification” unresolved. Should African-American children who speak standard English be considered as language minority students, which was advocated by the Ebonics resolutions that were adopted by the Oakland School Board in their controversial resolutions of 18 December 1996 and 15 january 1997? Based on Judge Joiner’s ruling one must conclude they should be.
Why? Because their native dialect represents a “language barrier” to full participation in school.
284: We need language policies that will ensure that students who are not native speakers of Standard English will not fail due to linguistic neglect.
The cases that brought these matters to law and educational policy were Plyer v. Doe, 457 US 202 (1982) and Lau v .Nichols, 414 US 563 (1974). Plyer v. Doe RESULTED IN A DECISION THAT REQUIRED STATES TO PROVIDE FREE PUBLIC EDUCATION TO UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANT CHILDREN and Lau v .Nichols, is the famous Supreme Court Case that called for school district to tend to the needs of LEP students through educational services that would be tailored to their linguistic needs. Both cases have been instrumental to the development of subsequent policies in support of viours forms of bilingual education.
Although a great deal has been written recently regarding educational reforms for language miinority students, emphasis is placed on LEP students. There is little scholarly acknowledgement of the tremendous ambiguity of section 10.2.1. The clearest evidence of this fact can be found in Judge Joiner’s remarkes.. As indicated above, his ruling was based on Tile 20 of the 1974 Equal Educational Opportunity Act. more precisely, section 1703 (f) of Title 20 was cited: however, this statute was originally writen to bolser Title VI and bilingual education.
The essential point boils down to the fact that 1703 (f) was n ever intended to apply to non-standard English; authors of the provision felt they were serving the needs of traditional language minority students. Judge joiner’s decision, to base the entire case of “20 U.S.C. 1703 (f)” has extraordinary implications for the education of African-American students (…)

10.2.1. Legal summary
286: Current regulations exclude most AAVE speakers from funding for language minority students because English is their native language.
10.4. Linguistic implications derived from the Black English Trial.
A distinguished panel of linguistic and educational experts affirmed the grammatical coherence of AAVE during the Black English T rial, which was strongly reaffirmed through a 1997 resolution by the Linguistic Society of America.
Brown v. Board in 1954 was hailed as the case that would lead to educational equity for African Americans, and other minority students of color.
These matters are further complicated by the fact that considerable linguistic diversity exists within every racial and ethnic groups in the US. Slave descendants have a unique linguistic history, however, when compared with every other group that has migrated to the US. As forced immigrants, what Ogbu (Ogbu, J. (1978). Minority Education and Caste. New York, Academic Press., Ogbu, J. (1992). “Understanding multicultural Education.” Educational Researcher 5(14): 24.) has called “involuntary caste-like” minorities, slaves did not have the linguistic luxxury of a gradual transition to English. Whereas the typical European immigrant came to the US with fellow speakers of their native language,(…), to maintain a family, to attend public schools (…) slaves were linguistically isolated upon capture (…),were reduced to immediate sale, a practice that destroyed many black families, were denied education by law and after emancipation, were subject to inferior education under strict policies of educational apartheid.

Baugh, John. 1999. Out of the Mouths of Slaves: African American Language and Educational Malpractice. Austin, Texas: University of Texas Press.

xiii: PREFACE:The world was vriefly transfixed on the linguistic consequences of American slavery after the Oakland school board passed a resolution declaring Ebonics to be the official language of the 28 thousand African American students enrolled in that district.
The Afro-centric scholarship that gave rise to Ebonics eventually collapsed undeer the combined weight of political pressure and the untenable linguistic hypothesis that a speech community can be defined in racial terms.
The Linguistic Society of America (LSA) entered the fray in January 1997, adopting a resolution that affirmed the linguistic integrity and grammatical coherence of African American English(AAVE), but these efforts were misunderstood by many in the general public who dismissed the scientific foundations of the LSA resolution as a mere evidence of an academic exercise in political correctness. Several critics presented demeaning portraits of liguistic analyses pertaining to American slave descendants. Ironically studies of AAVE are among the most advanced of any branch of sociolinguistic inquiriy by virtue of the factg that several of Labov ‘s (Labov, W. (1972). Language in the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular. Philadelphia, PA, University of Pennsylvania Press.// Labov, W. (1972). Sociolinguistic Patterns. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press.) seminal linguistic contributions are derived from studies of linguistic change and variation among African Americans.

Part 1: ORIENTATION 3: SOME COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT AFRICAN AMERICAN VERNACULAR ENGLISH Language is complex, and mastery of it too often tanken for granted. Linguists and psychologists have demontrated that the miracle of child language acquisition is uniquely human. All normal children in every society learn to speak without the aid of formal instruction. In American we find 3 groops of language learners: those who learn standard English as their first language, those who learn a nonstandard dialect of English natively, and those who do not learn English as their mother tongue. Immigrants to the United States arrive typically with little money and no knowledge of Enlgish, often preferring to speak only owth others who share fluency in their mother tongue -not because they are lazy but because learning a second language can be difficult, especially if you do not access to English language instruction. Having experienced linguistic prejudice firsthand, most of these first-generatoin immigrants insist that their children become “real” Americans by learning English. (4) It is rare to find Americans who, after three generations, have preserved their ancestral language, particularly to the exclusion of English. (Joke about trilingual, bilingual…and Americans) What distinguishes linguistic evolution of Enlgish in the United States is the concentration of various dialects on the East Coast, and a so-called general American dialect in the West and the Midwest. Also contributing to the evolution of American English was the migration of blacks from the South after the Civil War to urban areas of the north. They took their Southern speech patterns with them, including al of the unique linguistic forms that had been incorporated into the grammatical structure of speech among slaves. Unlike most white immigrants to urban centers, who eventually adopted local dialects, balcks generally remained isolated in impoverished ghettos and as a result, retained their dialect. This physical isolation contributed to linguistic isolation and the mainenance of African American vernacular English (AAVE). 4-5: The common stereotype is that nonstandard speakers, including many blacks, could speak “properly if only they put a sufficient effort. This view, while perhaps understandable, is woefully uninformed and simplistic. It fials to recognize the unique status of AAVE or the linguistic consequences of slavery. while most immigrants were able to continue to speak their ancestral language in ethnic ghettos, slaves were torn from their native communities and immediately isolated from others who shared their language. (…) Historically, it was illegal to teach slaves to read and write, effectively denying them access to litereate standard English: this unfortuante facthas also deepened the lingusitc abyss between AAVE nad standard English. Many speakers of black English view this dialect form an entirely different perspective: they value it. THeir personal and cultural identities are closely linked to the language of their friends, family, and forebears. AAVE symbolizes racial solidarity. As long as the adoption of standard English is percieved to be an abandonment of black culture, and African American verancular will continue to survive, and it will do so despite perceptions that black speech is ignorant. 6: Several linguistss also view black dialects from a different perspective; they see a coherent language system. For example, in AAVE we observe sentences like the following, with be: they be standin on the corner. He be talkin when the teacher be talkin. From a linguistic point of view, this use of be performs grammatical work. In African American vernaucular these sentences convey habitual activities. By contrast, the stand form is will be used instead of be to convey momentary actions. The difference between “He be happy” and “He is happy” is that the latter conveys a momentary state while the former refers to a perpetual state of happiness. Imagine the confusion confronting a black child in school who is trying to use standard English to convey a habitual state or event. Under such circumstances it would be difficult for the child not to use his or her native grammar. Be provides a grammatical tool that is unavailable to speakers of standard English. In addition to all that AAVE shares with other dialects of English, it has unique grammatical forms that serve important communicative funtions: it is far from being an impoverished dialect. 7:Chap.2: Language and Race: some Implicatoins of Bias for Linguistic Science The relationship between language and racial groups has both a biological and political dimention. The biological dimension first emerged historically as distinct genetic characteristics evolved among various human tribes in relative geographical isolation. Thus in the tiypcial case, language and race were originally correlated directly. 8: This linguistic ideal of equality among lanugages and the various races has never been reflecte din social terms. 9:Jensen’s hypothesis and the Linguistic Society of America response Linguistic science is uniquely equipped to redress the lanaugage dimention of morally indefensible racist ideologies wherever they are found. While linguists, of cours, have no special expertise on the political factors that support racism, they are in a unique position to expose racially loaded fallacies about language and mind. The most notorious is Arthur Jensen’s (Jensen, A. (1969). “How Much Can We Boost IQ and Scholastic Achievement?” Harvard Educational Review(39): 1-123.)’s claim that black children are intellectually inferior to white children on genetic ground. Since Jensen’s notions were based in part on fallacies about black language, linguists were ideally suited to combat them. And they did just that. The Linguistic Society of America (LSA) in 1972 endorsed a widely publicized resolution by Antony Kroch and William Labov that exposed the flimsy intellectual basis of Jensen’s ideas. (Quotes the whole declaration of Kroch, A. and W. Labov (1972). “Resolution in Response to Arthur Jensen (1969).” Linguistic Society of America Bulletin: 17-18., cf. [Kroch, 1972 #645]) PART 2: THE RELEVANCE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN VERNACULAR ENGLISH TO EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICIES 17: Many African American students do not feel, or have not felt, that schools are truly beneficial to their lives, and many African American parents have personal memeories of racist encounters in schools. 41: Chap.5: Educational Malpractice and the Ebonics Controversy The Ebonics controversy that attracted global attention early in 1997 serves greatly to amplify concerns regarding African American miseducation (cf. [Dewey, 1938 #646] because -unlike Oakland’s Ebonics venture -many educators now seek to avoind linguistic controversy, particularly pertaining to African American students and their combined legacy of racial discrimination and educational apartheid. 42: As a son, and grandson, of lifelong public school teachers I routinely overheard discussions at our kitchen table regarding African American vernacular English (AAVE), or ebonics, and educational malpractice, although they were not stated in these terms. 44: The Ebonics controversy focuses narrowly on the linguistic welfare of African American students, but it provides the basis upon which to consider combinations of related issues that extend the frames of educational malpraxis to individual students, that is, beyond language. The 1979 “black english trial” provides the strongest legal precedent regarding Ebonics, along with other eudcational programs and related court rulings based on race. 57: The Oakland Ebonics controversy The preceding legal cases find common ground inthe controversy that swept the nation after the Oakland school board voted unanymously on December 18, 1996, to declare Ebonics the official language of twenty eight thousand African African American students who attend public schools in the district. The original resolution, which was supported by a policy statement, claimed that Ebonics “is not a black dialect or any dialect of English”. That statement, and others, proved to be so controversial that the board adopted a revised resolution on January 15, 1997, that conceded that Ebonics “is not merely a dialect of English”. Ultimately the board decided to abandon Ebonics altogether. 57-58: Ebonics was introduced with specific reference to African American students despite the facts that many other students who are not black also speak nonstandard English. Without drawing specific attentionto the relevant linguistic detials, some proponents of Ebonics – quite inadvertently – perpetuated uninformed linguistic stereotypes regarding AAVE through oververt racial classification. The designation of 28’000 students in Oakland as speakers of Ebonics appears to be based on their race, and not derived from any form of direct linguistic evaluation. The case of Hoffman vs. Board then becomes relevant, where test procedures failed to meet the educational needs of an indivudual students. Imagine, if you will, the potential legal implications confronting a school district that makes sweeping generalisations about the linguistic classification of an entire racial group of students without some form of linguistic evaluation (flawed though such evaluation might be). I believe it was -at least partially- the lack of any suitable linguistic test or other educational diagnostic that forced Oakland educator to ultimately discard Ebonics: once burned, they stepped back from the public firestorm ignited by their December 18, 1996, resulution. The Ebonics controversy has made clear the need to find some way to reform education so as to allow educators sufficient flexibility to introduce new experimental programs to enhance standard English proficiency among SENN (Standard English is Non-Native) students, be they African American or from some other racial background, and to be able to do so without fear of malpractice litigation. And although the black English trial criticized the combined efforts of speech clinicians and educators that identified African American plaintiffs in the 1979 case as being “linguistically handicapped”, it would seem that Oakland educators, along witht he other sixteen school districts that participate in California’s SEP (Standard English Proficiency) program, would concur that their African American students who are SENN are “linguistically disadvantaged” although this disadvantage is more properly viewd as a social handicap that resuts from prevailing linguistic prejeudice against vernacular AAVE and is not a pathological linguistic disability shared by the disproportionaltely high nubmer of African American students who are enrolled in special education classes and bilingual education classes in diffeernt locations across the country (note 2: according to Culhane (Culhane, J. G. (1992). “Reinvigorating Educational Malpractice Claims: A Representational Focus”.” Washington Law Review 2(67): 349-414.). 67: CHAPTER 6: LINGUISTIC DISCRIMINATION AND AMERICAN JUSTICE 68: The situational dimension of linguistic prestige My previous research on African American Vernacular English (AAVE) demonstrates a pragmatic response to the preceding paradox; adult AAVE speakers shift linguistic styles depending on the circumstances (cf. Baugh, J. (1983). Black Street Speech: its history, structure and Survival. Austin, Texas, University of Texas Press.). Although style shifting is common everyhere, nonstandard speakers exhibit a greater degree of linguistic variation compared with standard speakers. 72: Bilingualism and bidialectalism My purpose here is to focus on those problems that arise from our linguistic diversity. An important distinction in linguistcs is made between bilingualism and bidialectalism. This distinction is useful in examining the treatment of minority communities within the U.S. legal system. Bilingual individuals (e.g. many Hispanics) speak two different languages; bid speakers (e.g. some American blacks) can shift dialects or style within a single language. Let me illustrate these distinctions among some well-known black personalities: Bryant Gumpel speaks standard English, Richard Pryor is a bidialectal speaker, and the young Louis Armstrong and Joe Frazier spoke nonstandard Black English. 79: CHAPTER 7: THE POLITICS OF BLACK POWER HANDSHAKES 80:Like spoken or sign language, a handshake has a meaning transmitted in a clear, defined way, with its own “grammatical” structure. (…) and just as conversation requires knowledge of a common language, handshakes require knowledge of shared norms. Many black Americans continue to use and develop elaborate new handshakes that demonstrate solidarity under special circumstances. 86:CHAP. 8: CHANGING TERMS OF SELF-REFERENCE AMONG AMERICAN SLAVE DESCENDANTS “Why don’t the blacks make up their minds? The whole subject is becoming tiresome. They chose black because they did not like Negro” From Valparaiso, Indiana, to Ann Landers, April 1989. As one who began to reintroduce the term African American before the Reverend Jesse Jackson formally called for this adoption (cf. Baugh, J. (1988). Language and Race: Some Implications for Linguistic Science. Linguistics: The Cambridge Survey. F. Newmeyer. Cambridge, Cambridge University. 4: 64-74.), I didn’t anticipate the sudden impact that he ould have on this linguistic change in progress. During ceremonies in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jackson stated, “Just as we were called colored, but were not that, an then Negro, but not that, to b e called black is just as baseless. Every ethnic group in this country has reference to some cultural base. African Americans have hit that level of maturity ” (Jackson, J. (1988). Speech at Ceremonies in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.). 151:CHAP. 13: RESEARCH TRENDS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN VERNACULAR ENGLISH: Anthropology, Education, and Linguistics. In my view, Linguistic science is socially active, In much the same manner that physicists challenged European and Asian fascism during WWII, linguistis can challenge racism, poverty and uninformed linguistic chauvinism. This chapter is intented forreaders who would like to knwo more about African American Vernacular English (AAVE). The following survey is not comprehensive; it offers intellectual bridges for thos who share my belief that linguists, and other concerned scholars, have an obligation to contribute to the equitable relieve of citizens who are less fortunate (see Labov, W. (1982). “Objectivity and commitment in linguisitic science: the case of the Black English trial in Ann Arbor.” Language in Society 11(2): 165-201.; Rickford, J. R. and A. Rickford (1995). “Dialect Readers Revisited.” Linguistics in Education(7): 107-128.). On December 18, 1997, the Oakland school board radically altered public perception of the linguistic legacy of American slavery when they voted unanymously to adopt a resolution declaring Ebonics the official language of the 28’000 African American students who attend school in that distric. Most people, including linguists, were caught fof guard by this Afrocentric classification that claimed to share no genetic affiliation with standard American English. 152: When Bloomfield (Bloomfield, L. (1933). Language. New York, Holt.) first spoke of AAVE, he did so from two perspectives; he confirmed that some viewed it as “bad” or “vulgar”, although linguistis preferred the more neutral term “nonstandard English”. Many people still share misguided perceptions of AAVE, especially in the wake of the Ebonics controversy (cf. chap.1, Baugh, J. (1997). “What’s in a name? That by Which We Call the Linguistic Consequences of the African Slave Trade.” The quarrterly of the National Writing Project(19): 9., Labov, W. (1972). Language in the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular. Philadelphia, PA, University of Pennsylvania Press. Shuy, R., Ed. (1964). Social Dialects and Language Learning. Champaign, Illinois, National Council of Teachers of English. Wolfram, W. (1969). A sociolinguistic description of Detroit Negro speech. Washington, D.C., Center for Applied Linguistics. Fasold, R. (1972). Tense marking in Black English. Washington, D.C., Center for Applied Linguistics. and Stewart, W. A. (1967). Sociolinguistic factors in the history of American Negro dialects. Florida FL Reporter: 11. were among the fist linguists to analyse AAVE as a coherent linguistic system worthy of scholarly attention. 155:Educational Foundations for the Study of AAVE Segregated schools were outlawed in Brown v. Board (1953) 157:Anthropologically oriented studies of AAVE Mitchell-Kernan (Mitchell-Kernan, C. (1969). Language behavior in a black urban community. Berkeley, California, Language Behavior Research Laboratory.) offered yet another perspective on African American styles of communication, and her work revealed some important sexual differences in speaking styles. 167:Glossary AAVE:AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH VERNACULAR ENGLISH AFDC:AID TO FAMILIES WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN ASD:AMERICAN SLAVE DESCENDANTS Creole: a new native language born of two or more languages in contact (see pidgin) ENN: English not native ERIC: Education Research Information Clearinghouse ESL: English as second language HPE: Hawaiian pidgin English LLSA: Linguistic Society of America pidgin: The linguistic product of contact between two or more languages hat has no native speakers. SE: Standard English SENN: Standard English is not Native SEP: Standard English Proficiency program Special Education: Federal-to-local educational programs for children with disabilities SVE: Southern Vernacular English Title I: Federal education programs for children in poverty. Title VII: Federal Funding for local educational programs for language minority students VAAC: Vernacular African American Culture.

Bearak, Barry. 1997. Between Black and White. New York Times, July 27, sec.1, p.1.

Beaugé, M. (2010). L’English Defence League, en guerre contre l’islam. LesInrocks.com

(De Newcastle) Ils veulent sauver leur pays du péril islamiste à coups de bastons et de défilés. Un an après leur apparition, les extrémistes de l’English Defence League déferlent sur l’Angleterre.
Ils veulent qu’on picole avec eux et ils insistent. « Allez, le Français, prends ton verre », lancent-ils alors qu’une commande de plus atterrit sur la table.
Ils sont quatre, avachis dans leur fauteuil, les yeux un peu rouges. Ils appartiennent à l’English Defence League, ils en sont même des leaders. Cela ne les empêche pas de passer le vendredi soir dans un hôtel bas de gamme de la banlieue de Newcastle. A la table voisine, on fête un enterrement de vie de garçon. Le futur marié a une tétine dans la bouche et une couche sur les fesses.
« Défendre notre pays contre les monstruosités islamistes »
Depuis sa création il y a un an, l’English Defence League a défilé dans la plupart des grandes villes anglaises. Demain, elle sera à Newcastle, dans le Nord du pays. Steve, le plus bavard de toute la table :
« Ça va être fendard. On ne sait jamais combien de gars vont venir. Mais il y a toujours du monde pour se marrer et défendre une bonne cause ! »
L’English Defence League ne délivre pas de carte de membre, ne se présente pas aux élections. Elle recrute sur Facebook puis s’empare de la rue, toujours de la même façon : elle envahit le centre-ville, met le boxon, fait le coup de poing avant de marteler son message. Steve, de plus en plus agité, résume :
« Nous aimons notre pays et voulons le défendre contre les monstruosités islamistes, nous sommes prêts à nous battre pour ça ! Mais attention, hein, nous ne sommes pas des racistes. Nous ne détestons pas tous les musulmans, simplement les extrémistes. Les autres sont nos amis ! »
Il a l’air de trouver la blague bien bonne. Il rigole. A moins que ce ne soit le futur marié qui l’amuse…
Une nouvelle division de l’English Defence League par semaine
Samedi 29 mai, 10h30. Devant la gare, ça s’agite déjà. Ils sont une cinquantaine, tassés dans un minuscule pub accolé à un magasin de sandwichs. Ils sont arrivés les premiers et n’ont visiblement pas beaucoup dormi. Sur leurs sweats à capuche noirs, au dessous d’une croix de Saint-Georges, on peut lire « English Defence League, Manchester division ».
A travers toute l’Angleterre et jusqu’en Ecosse et au pays de Galles, l’English Defence League compte une centaine de divisions. Il s’en crée une chaque semaine en ce moment et les sympathisants se bousculent. Ils sont plus de 50 000 à s’être manifestés via Facebook. Pour participer à une action, les plus motivés traversent le pays en voiture ou prennent un train à l’aube, à leurs frais. Les gars de Wigan et Bolton viennent d’ailleurs d’arriver à Newcastle.
A peine sortis de la gare, ils envahissent la chaussée et, déjà, beuglent à la gloire de l’EDL. Les flics, en armure anti-émeute, observent. Depuis plusieurs jours, ils ont prévenu les habitants de Newcastle que la journée serait chaude et ont conseillé aux chauffeurs de taxi, surtout ceux d’origine étrangère, d’éviter le centre-ville.
Ils appliquent leur tactique habituelle et forment un cordon hermétique autour du cortège pour empêcher tout contact avec la population locale. Mais à quelques mètres de la gare, dans une ruelle bordée par un Starbucks et un Costa Coffee, quelques types échappés du groupe se ruent déjà sur un gamin d’une vingtaine d’années, militant d’extrême gauche. Il encaisse plusieurs coups et tombe au sol. Les uniformes débarquent enfin, les gars de l’EDL cavalent. La police ne les rattrapera pas.
L’EDL recrute dans les stades de foot
L’English Defence League court vite et frappe fort. Trois semaines plus tôt, une dizaine de manifestants ont été interpellés dans la petite ville d’Aylesbury, dans le Sud-Est de l’Angleterre, pour violence et port d’armes prohibées.
En janvier dernier, à Stoke, il y avait eu 70 arrestations, et 90 quelques mois plus tôt à Birmingham. Pour s’être barricadés sur le toit d’une mosquée dans la petite ville de Dudley, deux hommes, devenus des martyrs, viennent de passer plusieurs semaines en prison.
Les types de l’English Defence League sont entraînés. Ils n’arrivent pas là par le militantisme ou le syndicalisme mais sortent des stades de football. C’est même le socle du mouvement.
Lancée par un groupe de supporters de Luton, l’EDL a rapidement pris de l’ampleur en recrutant parmi les clubs de Londres puis de tout le pays. Pour s’assurer d’une forte mobilisation, la League organisa les premières manifestations à proximité des stades les jours de match.
Aujourd’hui, les réseaux de communication des supporters, leurs sites Internet et leurs fanzines facilitent l’organisation des rassemblements de l’EDL. Des minibus, habituellement utilisés pour suivre l’équipe en déplacement, permettent aux militants de s’y rendre en masse.
Dans les manifestations de l’EDL comme dans les stades anglais, les membres du noyau dur sont des hommes blancs. Le plus souvent issus de la « working class », ils ont entre 20 et 40 ans et sont dans la force de l’âge : un point crucial pour l’EDL :
« On ne va pas se voiler la face, on a besoin de gros bras, de types prêts à cogner contre les extrémistes musulmans ou des policiers. L’intimidation physique fait partie du jeu. »
L’adhésion massive de soldats de la Royal Army est une bonne nouvelle pour l’EDL.
« Nous ne voulons pas vivre sous la charia »
Il est 14 heures. Sous la pluie, le cortège s’élance. Ils sont presque 2 000 et déambulent au pas de charge dans le centre-ville de Newcastle. Certains courent presque. Les chants à la gloire de l’EDL, calqués sur ceux des supporters de football, sont de plus en plus intenses. Sur le bas-côté, les passants s’arrêtent, stupéfaits. Le parcours balisé par la police est vite digéré.
Après un quart d’heure de défilé, le cortège arrive en bas de la place Bigg-Market, entourée de barrières et déserte. La police a fermé les magasins et les pubs. Les gars de l’EDL sont chez eux et veulent que ça se sache. Ils accrochent leurs couleurs, le blanc et le rouge, aux quatre coins de la place. Ronds comme des queues de pelle, certains se lancent dans un curieux pogo et s’écrasent contre les rideaux de fer des magasins clos. On aperçoit Steve, un peu en retrait, avec les autres leaders du mouvement.
La récréation dure dix minutes. Sur une petite estrade plantée au milieu de la foule, un homme s’avance. Malgré sa capuche et une sorte de masque antipollution, la foule a reconnu Tommy Robinson, le fondateur de l’EDL. Il prend le micro sous les clameurs :
« Nous sommes ici aujourd’hui en tant que membres, fiers, de l’English Defence League, commence-t-il. Nous fêterons notre premier anniversaire dans quelques jours. Nous sommes jeunes mais nous sommes expérimentés et de plus en plus nombreux. Sentez cette force. Ayez confiance les uns en les autres. Vous faites partie d’un mouvement programmé pour sauver notre pays. »
L’ovation dure plusieurs secondes. Puis Tommy Robinson passe aux choses sérieuses :
« Nous en avons assez. Les intégristes musulmans ont exploité notre tolérance et notre générosité. Nous ne voulons pas vivre sous la charia. Jamais nous ne laisserons ces extrémistes détruire notre pays. »
Officiellement, l’EDL est non raciste. Officiellement seulement.
En public, l’EDL ne stigmatise pas les musulmans dans leur ensemble, elle vise les intégristes, surfe sur les peurs dans un pays qui a raté dans les grandes largeurs l’intégration de sa communauté musulmane. Les leaders martèlent que les attentats de juillet 2005 dans le métro londonien on fait 56 morts. Souvent, ils prophétisent l’instauration de la charia et l’islamisation du pays avant 2040 si personne ne fait rien. Ils se défendent d’être racistes et poussent en première ligne des manifestations les quelques Noirs ou Indiens du mouvement. Ils ont nommé un sikh porte-parole.
En gage de leur ouverture d’esprit, ils rappellent aussi qu’il existe une division « femmes » et une division « homosexuels » dans le mouvement. Un jour, devant les caméras, un petit groupe a même tenté, symboliquement, de brûler un drapeau nazi. Mais celui-ci a longtemps refusé de se consumer et il a fallu sortir un bidon d’essence.
Sur le terrain, le discours officiel ne tient pas. Parmi les manifestants, on identifie régulièrement des skinheads et des membres de groupuscules d’extrême droite comme Combat 18 ou British Freedom Fighters. Des figures du British National Party, premier parti d’extrême droite dans le pays, jouent un rôle important dans l’organisation du mouvement. Un hooligan gallois, condamné il y a quelques années pour avoir poignardé deux supporters de Manchester United, a même contribué à sa formation.
Des violences entre l’EDL et des musulmans pourraient éclater
Nick Lowles, éditeur de la très documentée revue antifasciste Searchlight, prévient :
« Nous sommes en train d’assister à un regroupement de tous les mouvements d’extrême droite du pays, des plus importants au plus embryonnaires.
C’est un phénomène nouveau et inquiétant. Depuis les années 1970, aucun mouvement d’extrême droite n’avait pris une telle ampleur en Angleterre. Aujourd’hui, il suffirait d’un seul affrontement grave entre les militants de l’EDL et des musulmans pour que des violences éclatent à travers tout le pays. »
Il n’aura pas lieu à Newcastle ce jour-là. Mais bientôt, l’EDL filera à Bradford puis à Tower Hamlets, des villes ciblées pour leurs très importantes communautés musulmanes. Le Premier ministre David Cameron redoute un été de violences. Il y a deux semaines, en urgence, il a même fait transmettre une note sur le sujet à ses principaux ministres.
Photo des membres de l’English Defence League lors d’une manifestation à Aylesbury, le 1er mai (Eddie Keogh/Reuters)En partenariat avec LesInrocks.com
Le 22 juin 2010

Beck, Ulrich (2006.). Qu’est-ce que le cosmopolitisme? Paris, Aubier. cf. also my links.

cf. (de) Fontenay, E. (2011). Actes de Naissance. Paris, Seuil.

___(2006), Cosmopolitan Vision (Cambridge: Polity Press).

Becker, Gary. 1957. The Economics of Discrimination. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Quoted by FRANCOIS GRIN

Becker, Gary. 1976. The Economic Approach to Human Behavior. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Quoted by FRANCOIS GRIN

Bédarida, Catherine. 2000. Ahmadou Kourouma, le guerrier-griot. Le Monde, Mercredi 1er Novembre 2000, 15.

“Puisque nous, Africains, il nous faut faire notre demeure dans le français, nous faisons des efforts pour africaniser le français, nous faire une chambre où nous serons chez nous dans la grande maison qu’est la langue de Molière” confiait Ahmadou Kourouma à la revue Le Serpent à Plumes (No. 8, 1993).(…)Etudiant, il découvre une autre littérature: Balzac, Proust et, surtout, Céline. “Depuis Rabelais, personne n’a travaillé la langue comme lui. Il a fait du français du petit peuple, des marges, le français essentiel” Kourouma a lu et relu Voyage au bout de la nuit, le reprenant chaque fois qu’il commence l’écriture d’un de ses romans, le faisant lire à ses enfants. “Son désespoir me plaît”.De Voyage au bout de la nuit, Kourouma retient entre autres que la langue française n’est pas un tombeau gardé par l’académie, mais un humus propre à l’invention verbale.. Dans Les Sleils des indépendances, il introduit des tournures malinkés, d’une façon qui reste toujours compréhensible pour les lecteurs étrangers.(…)Après avoir admiré les Vietnamiens dans sa jeunesse, il se passionne aujourd’hui pour le Japon. “Les Japonais sont des animistes comme nous. Ils ont su conserver leur intégrité et leur culture, tout en adoptant la technologie, estime-t-il. Les Africains croient toujours que leur culture est un frein au développement. L’exemple du Japon montre que l’on peut être à la fois informaticien et animiste, ou musulman, ou catholique”.

Bedos, Nicolas (2012), Une Année Particulière, journal d’un mythomane, (vol.2; Paris: Robert Laffont).

Beeson, Mark. 1997. Australia, APEC, and the Politics of Regional Economic Integration. Asia Pacific Business Review ( 2.1).

Behr, Edward. 1995. Une Amérique qui fait peur: la liberté est-elle devenue l’instrument d’une nouvelle tyrannie? Paris: Edward Behr et les Editions Plon.

« On ne peut véritablement parler d’’insularité », car à l’époque où ce mot était à la mode, il impliquait un choix -l’insularité contraire du mondialisme. La certitude a succédé au choix et le nouveau cursus universitaire américain -réduisant l’importance culturelle et historique occidentale au profit du multiculturalisme, des études féministes et africanistes- n’a rien arrangé. A l’heure actuelle, s’impose la toute nouvelle political correctness ou PC, qui occupe le devant de la scène et l’Amérique ignore trop souvent ce qui se passe ailleurs dans le monde, sauf les phénomènes qui pourraient relever de la PC. C’est parfois le cas au Canada(…) »

Bell, David V.J. 1992. The roots of disunity : a study of Canadian political culture. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Bell, Pat. 1999. Jokes on Ebonics.

Objet:             Re: EBONICS 101
Date:             Thu, 16 Sep 1999 12:53:19 +0200
De:             Romy <romy@worldcom.ch>
A:             pbell@okstate.edu
Références:             1I loved it . Some were familiar, but some were quite new to me!!!!…I’ll
remember to borrow some when I need to explain grammatical structures without sounding borin’
Big hugs, Lady,
Daphne
pbell@okstate.edu a écrit :
After recalling our conversation on Ebonics, I decided to share this little inside joke with you.  This is a typeof joke that circulates among African Americans (and some others) about Ebonics.  Let  me know if you were able to understand the joke.  There are a number of different versions of  the same joke.
Subject:  EBONICS 101

Here’s a chuckle for the day.     –Hazel
Once again Leroy was asked to do a simple homework assignment. Still befuddled by the whole school thing, Leroy is a trooper.   He was given yet another set of vocabulary words to use in sentences
Here’s what he handed in:
1. HONOR ROLL – We was playin bidwiz on the stoop the other day,man I was HONOROLL.
2. PLANET – I know this dude who got arrested cause he gothim some seed to grow weed, and he PLANET in the backyard.
3. DISMAY – I went for a blood test, the doctor pulled out a big needle. He said DISMAY hurt a little.
4. OMELETTE – I should punch you dead in the eye for what you just  said but OMELETTE this one go this time.
5. STAIRWAY – Getting high is stupid. It just make you STAIRWAY into  space.
6. MOBILE – I went to the store to buy some food, I was short on cash, my man said gimme one MOBILE.
7. DEFENSE – I saw this dude running from the cops, but he hopped  DEFENSE and got away.
8. AFRO – I got so mad at my girl, AFRO a lamp at her.
9. AFTERMATH – I don’t feel like being at school today so AFTERMATH, I’m out.
10. LOCKET – I slam the door so hard, I LOCKET.
11. DOMINEERING – My girl’s birthday was yesterday, I got her a  DOMINEERING.
12. KENYA – I needed money fo the subway, so I axe a stranger KENYA spare some change.
13. DERANGE – is where da deer and antelope play.
14. DATA – At my basketball game, I scored thirty points. My coach said DATA boy.
15. BEWARE – I asked the man at the unemployment office, “Is dis BEWARE I get a job?”
16. DIMENSION – I be tall, dark, handsome and not DIMENSION smart.
17. COATROOM – The judge said, “One more outburst like that, you’ll be thrown out de COATROOM.”
18. DECIDE – My boy frontin’ like he love his girl but eribody know he got a couple of chicks on DECIDE.

Bencomo, Clarisa, and Elliott Colla. 1993. Area Studies, Multiculturalism, and the Problems of Expert Knowledge. Bad Subjects Web Page (5).

Over the last fifteen years, critiques of ‘area studies’ programs have become commonplace among
‘enlightened’ circles, thanks in part to exposes of the uses and abuses of the kinds of specialized knowledge these programs produce. These critiques have typically focused on the ways in which colonial discourse constructs colonized subjects as Others suitable for domination while at the same time collating ‘data’ useful for the management of those Others. In reaction to this production of knowledge in the service of colonialist management, many of us have seized on ‘multiculturalism’ as a means of winning control of that knowledge in order to fight racism and promote post-colonial interests. We see multiculturalism as the logical local extension and application of the projects of political and cultural ‘decolonization’ taking place since the 1950s in the so-called Third World.
Given such divergent histories and goals, one would expect multiculturalism to stand in stark contrast to area studies programs, which were after all the products of and reactions to the end of the colonial era. But how different are area studies and multiculturalism, and how well has the latter been able to overcome and correct the abuses of colonial knowledge? Has multiculturalism’s focus on issues of textual representation been at the expense of exploring the contexts in which representation takes place? By focusing on the similarities that link colonial-era ideas and institutions with their post-colonial reactions and readjustments, we hope to flesh out what we see as dangerous blindnesses in the multicultural project.
Area Studies: You are what I say.
By ‘area studies programs’ we mean those programs which came into maturity during the main period of historical decolonization (the 1950s and 1960s) and provided the framework for U.S. studies of non-European cultures. Although neither real independence nor actual decolonization took place during this period, imperialism did become a more complicated matter: these former colonies were given some semblance of autonomy and independence while their colonizers were compelled to carry on their work in less obvious ways. Neo-colonialism necessitated a more efficient, more informed management. Enter area studies programs, intended to provide interdisciplinary approaches to studying the cultures of the newly independent ‘nation’ states. ‘Culture’ promised to be a useful tool that would better implement and sell development projects: ‘You see, their society is based on kinship relations and therefore we must… ‘ Later, when these same projects failed, similar moves were made to explain why they were doomed from the start: ‘You see, their society is based on kinship relations and so they can’t…’
But how interdisciplinary did these programs become? While some area studies programs did emerge ‘spontaneously’ to fit the new needs, many others were formed as extensions of previously existing language studies departments. In the social sciences, we find disciplines based in understandings of culture (anthropology), micro-political relations (sociology), or macro-political relations (political science); and in the humanities, disciplines are divided by language group or artistic medium. Contrastingly, in area studies the only explanation for the ‘areas’ under study is the First World’s geopolitical ordering of the globe: it’s only when we hold the programs (Middle Eastern Studies, African Studies, East Asian Studies, etc.) up to the light of geopolitics and foreign policy that we become able to see the logic that brings together the likes of Iran, Turkey and Egypt in a monolithic ‘Middle East’, despite their many linguistic, religious, ethnic and cultural differences.
Such a conception of the world would seem to demand an interdisciplinary approach. Instead what we see is a proliferation of a-disciplinary area studies programs which are deficient in the theoretical underpinnings that characterize other departments, and yet qualify as disciplines in the worst possible sense of the term: by narrowly defining the range of legitimate discourse and acceptable speakers.
The practical reasons for this apparent contradiction are simple enough: despite their best efforts to order and homogenize phenomena that fall within the borders circumscribed by colonial mapping, these programs’ territorially-specific nature limits their ability to produce any theory because they describe phenomena in local terms, while the processes that produce those phenomena are actually global in character. In order to justify its existence as a distinct discipline, each ‘area’ has to be an exception to the rules that might apply to any other ‘areas’. More paradoxically, there is a tension inherent to area studies programs: on the one hand each area is judged according to universal models (‘development theory’, ‘the literary’, ‘kinship’, etc.), while on the other hand each area, as an epistmologically distinct territory, is always an exception to universal theories. Disciplines based in broader theoretical concerns can talk to each other; area studies programs, with their concentration on local knowledge, cannot. If traditional disciplines are characterized by their existence inside a field of theory, the only ‘fields’ area studies produce are geographic.
It’s only when knowledge is, or is made to appear, so specialized and insulated that ‘experts’ can exist. In the extreme version, ‘peripheral’ states and their cultures are dissected and explained by mostly Western scholars for the benefit of American audiences (undergraduate classrooms, congressional commissions, CNN viewers, etc.). This ‘knowledge’ is also projected back to the ‘area’ of study in the form, for example, of U.S. foreign policy and military intervention, or contained in development programs and business practices. The area studies specialist — the expert — mediates this process. (We can differentiate between two types of experts who dominate this field: the media/political experts, like Fuad Ajami or Henry Kissinger, who may well be ‘academics’ of sorts, and who claim to actually represent the people of ‘areas’;and the scholarly experts, like Princeton’s Bernard Lewis or Berkeley’s Muhammad Siddiq, who, while they may or may not make claims to represent living people, do so indirectly by presenting texts and ideas as their stand-ins.) As area studies students, we have had the rare opportunity to study with an assortment of scholars whose expertise has had to be both wider and more focused than one would expect to find in other fields: we have studied with ‘Arab Politics’ experts (could there be experts in ‘European Politics’?), ‘Third World Revolution’ experts (are there ‘First World Imperial Stability’ experts?) and ‘Arabic Literature’ experts (imagine an expert in ‘European Literature’ whose field of expertise would have to encompass Cicero,Beowulf, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Goethe, Voltaire as well as Eco and Adrienne Rich). Critics like Edward Said have already gone through the theoretical and political implications of such ‘expert knowledge.’ What we would like to add is that from our perspective as students and underlings of ‘the profession,’ these expert conditions lead to two things: superficiality and a lack of real debate. Classroom discussions tend to devolve into an exchange of ‘cases’ (‘In the village I studied…’) while the papers presented in journals and conferences are either so specialized (‘The Use of the Particle ‘qad’ in 9th Century Courtly Poetry’) or so generalized (‘Politics and Islam: Past, Present and Future’) that real engagement — either with audiences or with the material — is rare. It is ironic that area studies programs, which focus on the most ‘underdeveloped areas’ of the world, tend to be themselves the most
underdeveloped areas of the academy.
Multiculturalism: When ‘Others’ speak
In both material and philosophical terms, multiculturalism appears to have very little in common with the problems and processes we’ve discussed above. The area studies programs we are talking about are not only discourse factories but actual institutions with histories, generous funding, and close if sometimes obscure ties to state policy. In contrast, the projects of multiculturalism not only don’t enjoy the same institutional power or political clout, but because they challenge existing power hierarchies, they have been contested from the beginning.
Where the two projects intersect is in their concern about the colonized or marginalized subject. The philosophy behind area studies tends to wipe out difference by clumsily and violently unifying large social spaces and heterogenous cultures, passing off ‘peripheral’ cultures as homogenous and manageable areas;
at the same time, there is a corresponding and contradictory notion about these same areas: i.e., that what is really homogenous about the social groups in these areas is how atomized, different and contentious they are towards one another (they are all sects, tribes, clans, etc.). It is in this intersection that decolonial discourses — and multicultural discourse — have responded by positing their own identities. Where colonial discourse was epistemologically oppressive either because it forced divergent subjects into large, social-linguistic categories (Middle Eastern, Islamic, Arab) or because it dismissed indigenous assertions of community (Lord Cromer’s denial that he ruled over an ‘Egyptian people’), multicultural discourses have shown a sensitivity that allows and even privileges difference. How the two discourses construct peripheral and marginalized subjectivity has much to tell us: for area studies, the peripheral identity is reducible to hard, objective categories (the Arab Mind); for multiculturalism, it is the product of subjective experience (as in the writings of Franz Fanon, Eldridge Cleaver, or even Maxine Hong Kingston). Area studies work has focused on large groups of peoples in order to create identities, while multiculturalism has instead situated identity within individual, subjective experience.
Before returning to this point, we would like to critique two other characteristics of multiculturalism in the U.S. First, while multicultural projects have been accompanied by political programs (like putting pressure on universities to hire underepresented groups), their main thrust has been on texts in the narrowest sense.
While we acknowledge that representational politics has a role to play in these struggles, our point is that often we have focused more on literary representation than on political representation, and on canons rather than actual political engagement. We’ve been led to equate voice with action, looking at ‘giving voice’ as the main form of empowerment. But the spoken and the written word are only a small portion of the range of political action available to us. More on this when we come to issues of mediation.
Second, we are disturbed by the tendency of the proponents of multiculturalism to draw on a selective reading of history to privilege the victimization of certain groups at certain times while ignoring or eliding the histories of other oppressed groups. In fact, much of American multicultural discourse reflects the power relations that characterize our particular historical moment, not only with regard to the struggles of minority communities vis-a-vis mainstream American politics, but also among the contending minority communities themselves. For instance, while Zionist politics in America have been successful in voicing concerns about anti-Jewish racism (anti-Semitism), no similar discourse yet exists for addressing anti-Arab racism (although in France it does exist), and so Jesse Jackson’s comments about Jews have seemed unforgivable, yet the mainstream media routinely characterizes Arabs as terrorists and fanatics without provoking comment.
These sorts of inconsistencies are played out between other groups as well — notably between Chicano (Mexican-American) groups and more recent Mexican immigrants in the Southwest or between African-Americans and more recent African or Carribean immigrant groups in the U.S. While until now we have for the most part conflated the terms ‘decolonization’ and ‘multiculturalism’, here we see where the two actually come into direct conflict: marginalized groups with invested positions in the First World seem to move quickly to protect those positions against Third World groups or any minority groups seeking to restructure the existing balance.
But as much as these struggles are about group politics, our main critique of the U.S. multicultural project is the way it fetishizes individual identity. Identity politics has been central to multiculturalism and decolonization. What then have been the sorts of identities made possible by multiculturalism? Two ways of legitimating multicultural identity seem to come up regularly enough to warrant our comment. The first is a reaction to the oppressive nature of racist hierarchies, while the second is a reaction to the homogenizing nature of mainstream, ‘melting pot’ discourse. The first type of reaction becomes a problem when identity is created by simply reversing the poles of racist discourse, where the claims of victimized subjectivity are valorized over those of the oppressor. This seems to be the tack followed by groups like the Nation of Islam whose efforts for self-empowered identity are (at least in theory) predicated upon a vilification of whites. A more complicated version of this process is displayed in the identities claimed by the first wave of’pedigreed’ Cuban immigrants to this country, who, seeing themselves as the descendents of Spanish colonialists, need to situate themselves above both other Latin Americans (indios and negros) and mongrel ‘Unitedstatesian’ gringos. While this approach to identity may benefit some groups by redistributing the awards of a hierarchical system, it cannot claim to be more liberatory than its predecessor because it leaves the structure of that system untouched.
In contrast, the second method of legitimating identity is a response to the homogenizing tendency of colonial discourse: rather than ‘purity’ we find that hybridity, difference, specialness, individuality and enigma become highly-valued traits. While one might suppose that hybrid identity would be the strongest basis for forming shared interests and common understandings between the groups which can intersect in individuals, what often seems to occur is that it becomes the basis for fragmentation and monadization. On the one hand, it’s easy to see how certain groups which have invested a great deal in creating ‘authentic’ identities would feel threatened by individuals with multiple affiliations; on the other hand, it’s no harder to see why individuals with multiple identities might feel alienated from any one particular group. Indeed, the symptoms of this fragmentation and fetishization of individual identity have set the tone for much of multicultural politics.
In the academy, for example, multiculturalism has come to largely be about individual identities, made by and for individuals, with individual, oftentimes cosmopolitan, scholars speaking about and defending the special legitimacy of their own identities against others. One is often led to wonder what sorts of group politics could be formed by so many fiercely unique individuals. Where one expects to see individuals representing groups in politics, it often seems that the primary value of group identities stems from the fact that they provide platforms for the individual to speak from. It’s exactly this focus on individualism that we need to overcome: yet if we could break that fetishization and adopt a more fluid conception of hybridity we might find that hybridity seems to be the most promising and radical idea in the current discourse about multiculturalism — not only because it disrupts the concept of authenticity but because it also offers a basis for building coalitions and bringing together groups with similar interests and desires.
This isn’t to say that this would be easy. In fact, there is the opposite point to be made, that while we’ve been trying to make commonalities among forms of oppression we often fail to address the fact that these oppressions and identities have histories that are perhaps not so equivalent. Yet this has been getting worked out unconsciously within the tensions of multiculturalism itself: certain identities or combinations of identities seem to carry more weight than others, and certain histories of exploitation get left out altogether.
These are questions that must be addressed: How does one weigh issues of race oppression against those of gender or sexual preference? Why is class identity notably absent from multiculturalism? Furthermore, if we valorize hybridity over homogeneity, i.e., emphasize the ‘multi’ part of multiculturalism, does that need to entail a devaluing of the unicultural? There is no reason to assume that hybridity allows for full access to the multiple cultures represented in a single hybrid individual, nor that ‘mainstream’ cultures are transparent and self-identical, although this latter assumption is exactly the kind of foil that many multicultural arguments depend on.
The irony here in all this focus on individual, subjective experience is that it often mires us in, instead of freeing us from, the privileging of expert knowledge. At least in the academy and progressive politics, the sort of knowledge being offered by anti-racist and postcolonial discourse has come to have quite a highexchange-value and authority. And some people get to speak more than others by virtue of the ‘authenticity’ of their oppressed subjectivity or through their hybrid complexity: either way, some subject positions, by virtue of having been more colonized/ oppressed, seem to have more legitimacy than others. In other words, some get to become more expert than others, and some aren’t allowed to participate at all.
But if one could critique how expert knowledge was formed in colonial discourse by attacking it on the theoretical level, critiques of multicultural knowledge — because of its dependency on subjective experience — often take the form of, or are perceived as, ‘ad hominem’ attacks. And that’s why we are too afraid to give real life examples of abuses of this kind.
Mediation: Can we talk?
We’ve argued that the problem common to both area studies and many multicultural projects is their tendency to to create experts with specialized knowledge. For those of us interested in building a progressive politics, here’s the bind we find ourselves in: while recognizing our need for specialized knowledge, and therefore our dependency on mediation and mediators, how do we find alternatives to expert knowledge? Again, much of what is at stake in area studies and multicultural discourses is related to the representation of the post-colonial subject.
Specialized knowledge doesn’t have to be expert knowledge, and multinational corporations are not the only ones who need specialized knowledge; its usefulness for a globalized understanding of progressive politics should be equally obvious. Area studies programs, despite their strategic place in producing neocolonial knowledge, have had some useful, perhaps unintended, effects: for many of us our first
exposure to radical politics came through studying the movements of oppressed peoples outside the United States; for others of us, these experiences clarified the real issues at stake in our own political struggles within the U.S. Area studies can and should play a strategic role in a multicultural and anti-racist politics, but it is up to us to make it happen.
Returning to the problem of representation and mediation, we need to point out that much of post-colonial and multicultural discourse on the issue has placed more responsibility on the ontological side of the problem than on the political or the historical dimensions. In what is without a doubt the most referenced work about these issues, Edward Said’s _Orientalism_, there exists a certain tension between the ontological problems of representation and the historical conditions of a specific representation. More often than not, the two in fact are conflated: thus the cultural, military and economic interests of a specific colonial formation vis-a-vis the Middle East is transformed into an essentialized problem of human knowledge.
While we don’t deny that the ontological dimension to the problem exists and should be explored, we do think that there is plenty of progress to be made in the other aspect of representation, i.e., in the actual historical conditions under which representation takes place. More clearly, we don’t believe that the representation of ‘Others’ is an oppressive project on primarily ontological grounds (one can never really ‘know’ the Other…), but rather because a nexus of historical and political conditions of mediation — i.e., the relations of interests, audience and accountability — makes it so. And these are exactly the conditions that we are in a position to change for the better.
The problems in representation stem from the fact that there seem to be few mechanisms for holding those with specialized knowledge accountable for the way they represent the subjects of that knowledge. One possible way of building in greater accountability would be to begin from a different understanding of
representation: attempting to construct mediations that are two-way instead of unidirectional. In other words, if we have found ourselves trapped in certain problems concerning the textual aspects of representation, there still remains much we can do to improve the *contexts* of representation.
We believe that the multicultural project has a long way to go before it ever enjoys the sort of institutionalized cultural power its opposite enjoys today. We look forward to the day when the utopian impulses contained in multiculturalism become dominant. Therefore it is our responsibility in the academy to shape and criticize that project, for even with the best intentions, the most utopian of projects can end up reproducing what they set out to transcend.
Clarisa Bencomo is a PhD candidate in the Politics Department at Princeton University. She is currently studying Arabic in Cairo.
Elliott Colla is a PhD student in the Comparative Literature Department at Berkeley. He is currently a visiting scholar at Cairo University. Both are pursuing specialized knowledge with the support of U.S. government-funded area studies commission grants. Comments and critiques are welcome. The authors can be reached through Email at the following Bitnet addresses: clarisab@egaucacs.bitnet and ehc12345@egaucacs.bitnet.

Bellonie, J.-D. G., Emmanuelle (2011). La place du français en question dans les représentations de locuteurs francophones en contact avec d’autres langues. Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde. Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg.

Université des Antilles Guyane et Martinique (et CRILLASH)
Locuteurs dont les pratiques langagières se réalisent en français mais dont l’environnement familial comprend d’autres langues.
Territoire français
Corpus extrait de corpus plus vastes (Multicultural london English, Multicultural Paris French)
Enquête à Epinay sous-Sénart (Guréin 2010,Entretiens avec des enfants d’Epinay, une étude sociolinguistique à l’usage des acteurs de l’enseignemetn)
Corpus issu de son travail de thèse

Problèmatique
Le français en France est en contact avec d’autres langues (langues d’immigration, voir corpus MPF (MLE-MPF) d’un point de vue socio- et eco-linguistique
Resultats: influences des langues de l’immigration sur la forme et sur le fonds (Treps, 2005: 230 sur le Kiff)
Jeu sur la hierachisation des entrées du répertoires sur les entrées sociolinguistiques

Hypothèse:
l’actualisation du francais est dépendante des représentation des locuteurs
la notion de contact est plus complexe qu’il n’y parait
les rapports que les locuteurs entretiennent se jouent sur leur rapport au francais
les locuteurs de contact sont des passeurs de mots: lieu d’emergence e phénomènes innovants

Ecole: lieu de diffusion de l’idoéologie du standard
intégration à la francaise à visàe universaliste (le modèle républicains français selon Raveaud 2003)
pas de place pour les particularité communautzaires. CREATION des ELCO EN 73 vite abandonnée cf. Bertucci 2007)
cf. Tribalat 1999 sur le mythe universaliste sur lequel repose le système français qui ne peut survivre sans un certain laminage des particularismes (p. 145)
Enfants et adultes pour perspective longitudinale et sychronique

Français enseigné: seule forme valable (socialement et linguistiquement et seule langue valable)
Différences entre les communautés:
Antillais: le créole comme menace
Maghreb: arabe en concurrence avec le français par cours d’arabe à l’école, à la mosquée ou ailleurs.
Afrique subsaharienne: éradiquer la langue autre

PRATIQUE DES ADULTES: certains disent avoir totalement éradiquer la langue autre, d’autres essaient de la récupérer (désir de réinvestir la culture des parents par l’apprentissage de la langue sans rogner sur les acquis en français), approche diglossique du bilinguisme

Les locuteurs issus plus ou moins directement de l’immigration d’Afrique du Nord: arabe à côté du francais comme langue enseignée à l’école, revendication commmunautaire assumée et assumable socialement, emprunts de l’arabe dans le français y compris accent.

Hyper code-switching: cf. hypercorrection (Berrendonner 1998) et au-dela du principe de code switching de Mondada 2007): s’aligne sur les représentations qui hierarchisent les langues:
Faire usage d’un élément supposé d’une langue à l’intérieur d’une construction dans une langue matrice pour afficher son appartenance à une communauté fantasméme, localement élevée au rang de norme prestigieuse sans pour autant perde de vue la norme commune.

(cf. les non musulmans qui jurent sur le Coran de la Mecque ou le Coran de ma mère…)

construction de ce que peut être la langue et la culture en question. cf. Jamous Haroun. De l’intégration aux “patries imaginaires”. In: Sociétés contemporaines N°37, 2000. pp. 71-88.
doi : 10.3406/socco.2000.1721
url:http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/socco_1150-1944_2000_num_37_1_1721

Benes, Marie-France. 1999. L’éducation interculturelle au service du savoir-vivre ensemble: le cas de l’école québécoise. Revue Québécoise de Droit International: actes du Séminaire international de Montréal sur l’éducation interculturelle et multiculturelle. 12 (1):25-32.

Benhabib, S. (2004), The Rights of Others (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).

quoted by Morris, Lydia (2012 ), ‘Citizenship and Human Rights’, The British Journal of Sociology 2, 63 (1).

Bennett, David, ed. 1993. Cultural Studies: Pluralism & Theory. Vol. 2, Melbourne University Literary and Cultural Studies. Melbourne: Department of English, University of Melbourne.

cf. Gunew, Sneja, Multicultural Multiplicities: US, Canada, Australia

Bennett, David (ed.), (1998), Multicultural states: rethinking difference and identity (New York: Routledge).

Benrabah, Mohamed. 2004. Language and Politics in Algeria. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics 10 (78):59-78.

Since independence, Algerian authorities have used a number o ideological processes to gain political legitimacy. One of these processes is the language politcy known as Arabization. The present article shos how this policy aims at providing the regime with political legitimacy, and serves as a means of social control (Arabization/Islamization). We argue that, far from bringing about reconcilation between various groups and between these and the authorities, Arabization has led to serious problems and major conlicts that have undermined both social cohesion and the authority of the regime.
Notes:
59: After Algeria won its independence in July 1962, its leaders decided to choose “assimilation” as a model of nation-building. This model, which can be traced back to 18th century Liberal revolutions, aims at making most community members alike, sharing the same behavior habits and thought patterns. Within this type of integration, citizens are expected to learn and speak the same language. Monolingualism is considered to be the means by which the people can be most easily united.
(…)Authorities in Algeria have chosen to adopt the (…)philosophy best known as “the policy of Arabization” or “Arabization” for short.
The supporters of this policy believe that this type of nation-building, in which one language plays a major role, can serve to reduce conlicts that come from factors that can roughly be divided into two categories. First, because of geographical spread which generates multilingualism, miscommunication is likely to occur between the people of the same nation. Second, the use of more than one language in a community can create inequality and exclusion among its citizens. A language policy that encourage monolingualism is thus meant to produce natioanl integration both horizontally and vertically. Political and social leaders, who prefer this approach, openly put these forward as their objectives and Algerian leaders are no exception. For example,one member of this group, who served the regime for 25 years, described Algerian linguistic and cultural pluralism as divisive and as a “mixing of lements from iss assorted cultures, and often contradictory, inherited from periods of decadence and the colonial period” (Taleb Ibrahimi, A. (1981). De la décolonisation à la révolution culturelle (1962-1972): SNED.) In 1973, the then General Secretary of the Ministry of Education said that Arabization was meant to fill in the gap between those in leadership and the people (Berri, Y. (1973). Algérie: la révolution en arabe, Jeune Afrique (pp. 14-18).)
But before dealing with these aspects, it is necessary to consider first the issue of why language and politics “have been wedded in an indissoluble union” in Algeria, as in many other countries. (Weinstein, B. (1983). The Civic Tongue, Political Consequences of Language Choices. New York & London: Longman.)
At the source of the relationship between language and politics in Algeria, there is the question of legitimacy. Bernard Cubertafond quite rightly states “In Algeria, the crisis of legitimacy is profound. It is the essential problem of this country” (Cubertafond, B. (1995). L’Algérie contemporaine. Paris: PUF.). Political leaders, who assumed leadership

Bensekat, M. (2011). Le français conversationnel des jeunes de Mostaganem: “une forme hybride”. Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde. Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg.

Rapport entre oral enseigné à l’Uni et communication entre élèves hors de la classe.
Mostaganem, langue de communication reste le français assez largement à l’oral

langue unique et dans laquelle ils se reconnaissent
comment ils parlent
langues en contact
fins expressives et interactionnelles
analyse discursives

Choix sociolinguistique et diversité des locuteurs

Langue maternelle qui vient doubler le français (répétition fait sens comme si le français était insuffisant)
75 à 90 % des échanges se font en français mais aucune n’est totalement dénuée de l’arabe.
ritualisation sociale par formules toutes faites (saha salam, ok salut répondant à hammala à demain alors)

communications codiques, stratégies de communication efficace.
Règle du mélange se passe quelque soit les intervenants ou les interactions.
langage nouveau exploitant les richesses de chaque langue….véritable français d’algérie.

Bensoussan, G. (2011). Eviter l’Etat unique et arabe. JCall: les raisons d’un appel. D. Chemla. Paris, Liana Levi 25-36

34:Dans l’Appel à la raison, les mots “faute morale” ont choqué. De fait, si faute morale il y a, le curseur n’est pas où on le croit. L’occupation de territoires et la domination sur les populations qui y vivent conduitsent à une logique de violence. Comme toute violence, elle gangène le corps social, elle s’étend, elle le corrompt. Il n’y a pas d’occupation innoncente, non pour des raisons morales mais pour des raisons politiques. La corrupion règne à un niveau inégalé en Israël depuis la fondation de l’Etat. Croit-on qu’ell en’ait aucun rapport avec la logique de l’occupation? Parce que le déni du droit ne s’arrête pas à la “ligne verte”, il gangrène les consciences et ouvre le chemin de la corruption. Et de la médiocrité, celle de la classe politique de l’Etat d’Israël. L’une des rares épopées du XXe siècle est aujourd’hui entre les mains de politiciens de sous-préfecture.
35: S’ingérer dans les affaires israéliennes? L’argument est entendu, mais il ne manque pas de sel quand les jusqu’au-boutistes de France, depuis leurs positions acquises et leurs enfants à l’abri, semblent prêts à se battre jusqu’au dernier israélien.

Benzenine, B. (2012). La langue algérienne mérite d’être valorisée. El-Watan. Alger.

Compte-rendu du congrès  du centre national d’anthropologie sociale et culturelle d’Oran, 20-22 mars 2012

Bereiter, Carl, and Siegfried Engelmann. 1966. Teaching disadvantaged children in the pre-school. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

quoted in Labov, W. (1972). Language in the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular. Philadelphia, PA, University of Pennsylvania Press. as the wrong approach to black children education. 

Berman, Paul, ed. 1992. Debating PC: The Controversy over Political Correctness on College Campuses. New York: Laurel.

Bernard, Philippe. 2004. Interview de Didier Lapeyronnie, prof de sociologie à l’université Victor Segalen de Bordeaux. Le Monde, mardi 6 juillet 2004, 6.

” le repli a lieu sur le ghetto, un lieu vide de sens”.cf.Smolar, P. (2004). “Les RG s’alarment d’un “repli communautaire” dans les banlieues.” Le Monde mardi 6 juillet 2004, pp. 6.“Repli” c’est évident; “communautaire” , sûrement pas. Parler de “Repli communautaire” relève d’une fausse interprétation. Si la tendance était communautaire, elle se traduirait pas une capacité collective de solidarité et d’unité culturelle. La réalité est prie: le repli a lieu sur le ghetto, un lieu vide de sens.Ce qui frappe surtout c’est la fragmentation extrême de cet univers. Le mode des garçons n’est plus celui des filles, ceux qui réussissent ne vivent pas sur la même planète que ceux qui échouent. Cela sur fond de développement du racisme.De quel racisme s’agit-il?Le racisme n’est pas une opinion, c’est une façon de donner sens au monde social. Toute la difficulté est que lesvictimes du racisme finissent souvent par reconstruire le mode dans des catégories racistes. Les gens s’identifient de plus en plus par des appartenances ethnico-raciales. Quant à l’antisémitisme, il est inscrit dans le vocabulaire quotidien. A Belleville, j’ai entendu des filles reprocher à leurs copains d’écouter “de la musique feuj”; dans une cité d’Angoulême, un gamin dont la poignée de main est un peu molle se fait reprocher de “serrer la main comme un feuj”. Les jeunes trouvent qu’on en fait trop pour les juifs alors qu’ils se considèrent comme les premières victimes du racisme. A quelle époque datez-vous la montée de cette obsession à propos des juifs?Beaucoup pensent que cela date de la deuxième intifada. Mais outre le fait que cel me gêne parce que, derrière, il y a la vieille idée que les juifs sont responsables de l’antisémitisme, c’est plutôt le 11 septembre qu a libéré cette parole antisémite, avec la croyance folle mais répandue que les juifs sont derrières les attentats. J’entends davantage de vielles rengaines antisémites – “les juifs ont le pouvoir”,” ils tiennent les média” que de témoignages de la prétendue identification avec les palestiniens.Quelle place attribuez-vous à l’islam dans la montée de l’antisémitisme et plus généralement dans le repli?La culture musulmane est probablement présente dans certaines expressions quotidienes, mais ce n’est pas le cas de l’essentiel des réflexions entendues. Mis à part le malaise que je ressens en entendant des propos intolérables, je me dis que leur sauteurs sont tellement bien intégrés qu’ils ont repris le vieil antisémitisme européen.

Bernstein, Richard. 1994. Guilty If Charged. New York Times Review of Books, 1994.

1995. Dictatorship of virtue: How the battle over Multiculturalism is reshaping our Schools, our Country and our Lives, Vintage Books. New York: Random House.

There is a school of French historians that uses the word dérapage to describle the fateful moment when the Great Revolution of 1789 (…) skidded from the enlightened universalism of the declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen into the rule of the Committee of Public Safety and the Terror.

Berri, Y. 1973. Algérie: la révolution en arabe. Jeune Afrique, April 7th, 1973, 14-18.

quoted in Benrabah, M. (2004). Language and Politics in Algeria. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 10, 59-78. 

Bettoni, Camilla, and John Gibbons. 1988. Linguistic pluralism and language shift: a guise-voice study of the Italian community in Sydney. International Journal of the Sociology of Language (72).

In Australia, besides English, the majority official language common to all Australians, there are numerous Aboriginal and immigrant languages used regulaily in daily life. Multningual AurtrSa is very proud of its rich languageresources. Yet the attempts at maintairung them produce Little result, as it seems common fur mmority languages to be abandoned once English is acquired, albeit with different patterns of language sllift. In the case of Italian, the shuft is rapid, mucli more rapid than some of its demographic characteristics would predict. In fact nunrerical strength, a long history of immigiatian, and dense concentrations oi population would favor main- tenance rather than shift tree Glies et al. 1977: 312-315). In trying to es- tablish some rank ordering of rdctun affecting language ecology in Australia, Clyne (1982) explams this apparent cuntradictiun by demonstrating that, across languages, demographic and sociocultural factors intertwine differ- entry, and that consequently some factors are poor predictors when considered in isolation. Our general hyputhesr here is that, in the case of Italian, the relative strength of dernugnphic factors is weakened by the (act thatuery few, if any, Italians in Austialia speak Standard ItaPan, that their cohesion is broken up into numerous dialects and regional or popular varieties, and that their attitudes toward these nonstandard varieties are mostly negative. The contribution of standardization to tire vitahty of a language variety has already been noticed in tile literature (see Giles and Ryan 1982: 5).

Betts, Katharine. 1991. Australia’s Distorted Immigration Policy. In Multicultural Australia: the challenges of change, edited by D. Goodman, D. J. O’Hearn and C. Wallace-Crabbe. Melbourne: Scribe.

Bezzina, A.-M. (2011). Le contexte maltais: des contacts omni-présents. Langues en contact: le français à travers le monde. Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg.

petit pays surpeuplé. 2 Iles principales, Malte(locuteurs en général de maltais standard, contact avec l’anglais) et Gozo(habitudes linguistiques qui les distinguent des maltais, 8% de la population maltaise)
Dominations étrangères: Maltais langue à strates successives base arabe, influences romanes notamment siciliennes, latin avec les chevalieurs de StJean et Italien (toscan) et sicilien, pouvoir colonial anglais important élément anglosaxon au niveau du lexique.
Attitudes divergentes:
Maltais langue nationale depuis 64 mais Maltais et anglais sont les deux langues officielles. Alternance codique (mélange maltais-anglais cf. Borg 1980), langue des tribunaux: maltais. Anglais domine dans textes écrits. Films anglais non traduits, radio en maltais mais présence de nouvelles stations anglos. Emploi majoritaire de l’anglais ppour l’écrit et du maltais pour l’oral. Chat en Maltais mais sites internet anglais.
Valette: maltais standard. ailleurs on peut trouver des endroits branchés où l’anglais domine, ailleurs encore maltais à diphtongues stigmatisées….etc…
appellations différentes parfois péjoratives ou injurieuses: tal-pepè (snobs), hamailli (criards), bl-imghawweg (tordu) etc…
Les politiques linguistiques sont en discussion.
Situation clairement diglossique avec anglais variété haute et maltais variété basse.
Son enquête confirme que l’anglais domine à l’écrit et le maltais à l’oral.

Questo insipido e sciocco dialietto, o patois, bisognerabbe procurare di stirparlo….
le lexique est principalement roman, cependant l’arabe domine dans le vocabulaire quotidien d’où l’impression sémitique du maltais.

Condamnation des parents maltophones qui poussent leurs enfants à parler en anglais, pourtant c’est une situation généralisée
condamnation presque générale de l’habitude d’appeler le maltais linguwa tal-bigilla (langue de la bigilla, mets des pauvres)

Contact des varités est fondé sur la diglossie (voir Caruana à paraître).

maltais: église, tribuaux, discours et fonctionpublique
anglais pour séminaires et colloques, inviation de mariate et autres, cours unviersitaires et correspondance commerciale ou privée
diglossie sociétale, schizoglosssie: les locuteurs adaptent leur propre comportement et les prorpres attitudes linguistiques selon la situation.

Histoire coloniale de Malte de 1880 à 1939. explique la valorisation de l’anglais par rapport au maltais.

3 pilliers de l’identité maltaise: langue maltaise, religion catho et resistance face à la domination étrangère.

Nouvelles réalité sociale: indépendance, effritement de la religion, contact des langues. La lpopulatin traverse une période de mutation ientitaire.

Les maltais sont souvent taxés de racistes par leur attitude vis-à-vis de l’arabe. La vaste majorité des personnes interrogées se sont déclarés indifférents et 16% disent que cette origine les gêne. Implications politiques: amitié pro-kadaffi d’un ancien premier ministre impliquant d’étudier l’arabe

Bhargava, R, Bagchi, Amiya K., and R., Sudarshan (eds.) (1999), Multiculturalism, liberalism and democracy (Delhi: Oxford University Press).

Bharucha, Rustom ‘ Politics of culturalism in an age of globalisation: discrimination, discontent and dialogue’, Economic and Political Weekly, 8 (34), 477-89.

Bibby, R.W. 1990. Mosaic Madness: The Poverty and Potential of Life in Canada. Toronto: Stodart.

Bible ‘Chapter 8, art. 9’, The Book of Esther

8:9 Then were the king’s scribes called at that time in the third month, that is, the month Sivan, on the three and twentieth day thereof; and it was written according to all that Mordecai commanded unto the Jews, and to the lieutenants, and the deputies and rulers of the provinces which are from India unto Ethiopia, an hundred twenty and seven provinces, unto every province according to the writing thereof, and unto every people after their language, and to the Jews according to their writing, and according to their language.

9. Les scribes du roi furent alors convoqués, en le troisième mois, qui est celui de Sivan, au vingt troisième jour de ce mois. Un édit fut rédigé, accordant tout ce que Mordekhaï avait ordonné pour les Juifs, aux satrapes, aux gouverneurs, aux nobles des provinces, de Hodou jusqu’à Kouch, cent vingt sept provinces, à chaque province selon son écriture, à chaque nation selon sa langue et aux Juifs selon leur écriture et leur langue.

Bikales, Gerda. 1986. Comment: the other side. In International Journal of the Sociology of Language (60):77.

Binder, Amy. 1999. Friend and Foe: boundary work and collective identity in the afrocentric and multicultural curriculum movement in american public education. In The Cultural Territories of Race: Black and White Boundaries, edited by M. Lamont. University of Chicago Press.

221: The movement known as Afrocentrism -an intellectual movement that has grown in the nation’s universites and a pedagogical reform movement that thas taken place in many of the United States predominantly black public school systems – it is a philosophy based on an essentialist conception of race that posits the cultural, behavioral and lifestyle unity of all decendants of Africa, no matter where they have ended up following the black Diaspora. 222:In Winant’s (Winant, H. (1994). Racial Conditions. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.) terms, Afrocentrism is a “racial project” insofar as it is an interpretation, representation, or explanation of racial dynamics and, at the same time, an effort to change the organization and distribution of resources along racial lilnes, in this case educational resources. Yet Afrocentrism has not attracted overwhelming support amoung the majority of African-Americans and, in fact, has proved divisive (…) Afrocentrism 227: Introduced in the early 1980s by Molefi Kewte Asante of Temple University, Afrocentrism has grown in black studies program at universities around the nation as Maulana Karenga, Tsheloane Keto, Asa Hilliard III, John Henrik Clarke, Leonard Jeffries, and others have pursued both the intellectual bases of the project as welll as its infusion into college, high-school, and elementary school curricula. The intellectual project of Afrocentrism is to “study African peoples from an Africa-centered prism”. (…)Afrocentrism recognizes no division between the African past and the African-American history, and regards as “ahistorical” and “mythical” any social science tht does not trace these continuous African Roots. So, if, for example, a scholar sets out to study “Africans in the inner cities of the Northeast United States, it must be done with the idea in the back of the mind that one is studying African people, not “made-in-America Negroes” without historical depth” (Asante, M. K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge. Trenton, N.J., Africa World Press: 15). Welsh-Asante (cited in Asante, M. K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge. Trenton, N.J., Africa World Press), for example, argues that there is an African Aesthetic, which is “based on seven “senses” shared by all Africa-descended people around the globe: polyrhythm, polycentrism, dimensional, repetitia, curvilinear, epic memory and wholism” (Asante, M. K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge. Trenton, N.J., Africa World Press: 12), At thîts most controversia (and may Arocentric scholars themselves reject such notions), this conception of race includes suggestions about personality based on melanin content and other genetic hardwiring). Afrocentrism versus Multiculturalism 229: Contrasted with Afrocentrism is multiculturalism, a movement whose exact definition is impossible to specify. 230: As the “antithesis” of Eurocentrism, Afrocentrism replaces multiculturalists’ emphasis on pluralism and all cultures’ interdependence, and stresses instead the uniqueness of African peoples, the impact of Sfricans on world civilization, and proposes that the ultimate “other” to white hegemony is Africanity. Afrocentrism mission is felt to be revolutionary and, as such, is irreconciliable with the conventionally pluralist claims of multiculturalism.

Bisaillon, Robert. 1999. Diversité et cultures: Pour une école québecoise inclusive et non discriminatoire. Revue Québécoise de Droit International 12 (1):13-15.

Bissonnette, Lise. 1990. Culture, politique et société au Québec. Centre canadien d’architecture: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Citée par Neil Bisoondath: “Aux yeux des Canadiens, écrit Lise Bissonnette, qui aiment penser qu’ils vivent selon les canons officiels du multiculturalisme, la culture québécoise n’est qu’une des giges d’un grand bouquet multiculolre qui s’épanouit d’un océan à l’autre.”

___1995. Préface à l’ouvrage de Bissoondath, Neil, Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme. Montréal: Boréal.

11: Sous le couvert de la bienveillance, du respect de son origine différente, le milieu universitaire recréait des ghettos, l’empêchait de s’intégrer pleinement au pays qu’il avait choisi, le renvoyait sans cesse à la culture qu’il avait sciemment voulu quitter.
12: (…)Le multiculturalisme militant qui l’a menacé dans sa fibre même en lui refusant, paradoxalement, au nom d’une amitié exaltée pour sa culture d’origine, de vivre le destin individuel qu’il a choisi.
Quiconque attend de ce livre une sorte de massacre organisé du multiculturalisme d’Etat devra chercher ailleurs. Neil Bissoondath ne joue pas au politologue, il ne décortique ni la loi qui a fait du multiculturalisme la définition officielle de l’idientié canadienne, ni les programmes qui en découlent et qui son, au demeurant assez insignifiants.
Nous entrons, en quelque sorte, dans des désarrois. Celui du vieux Canada, fondateur et blanc et religieux, qui a accueilli l’affirmation exacerbée des différences en se faisant à son tour menaçant. Celui du nouveau Canada, où l’origine étrangère devient une sorte de supériorité morale qui devient à son tour une vigile instituant le soupçon permanent entre les cultures. L’un et l’autre sont victimes d’ennemis imaginaires, d’illusion. L’un et l’ature sont ennemis de la liberté.
Neil Bissoondath vit aujourd’hui au Québec dont il préfère le projet cutlurel sans épouser pour autant le projet de souveraineté, , ce qui agacera les esprits bien rangés.

Bissoondath, Neil. 1994. Selling Illusions: The Cult of Multiculturalism in Canada. Toronto: Penguin Books Canada.

Bissoondath, Neil. 1995. Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme. Translated by Jean Papineau, Liber. Montréal: Boréal.

ouvrage qui m’a été offert par Boulou de B’béri, un chercheur et cinéaste que j’ai un peu aidé à finir sa thèse, en automne 99. Note: j’ai défini des thèmes: origines ethniques plurilinguisme plurilinguisme et multiculturalisme multiculturalisme d’état, québec et le discours académique (PC). la section sur le multiculturalisme d’état a été placée dans la version anglaise de l’ouvrage pour cause de manque de place Bissonnette, Lise. Préface à l’ouvrage de Bissoondath, Neil, Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme. Montréal: Boréal, 1995. 11: Sous le couvert de la bienveillance, du respect de son origine différente, le milieu universitaire recréait des ghettos, l’empêchait de s’intégrer pleinement au pays qu’il avait choisi, le renvoyait sans cesse à la culture qu’il avait sciemment voulu quitter. 12: (…)Le multiculturalisme militant qui l’a menacé dans sa fibre même en lui refusant, paradoxalement, au nom d’une amitié exaltée pour sa culture d’origine, de vivre le destin individuel qu’il a choisi. Quiconque attend de ce livre une sorte de massacre organisé du multiculturalisme d’Etat devra chercher ailleurs. Neil Bissoondath ne joue pas au politologue, il ne décortique ni la loi qui a fait du multiculturalisme la définition officielle de l’idientié canadienne, ni les programmes qui en découlent et qui son, au demeurant assez insignifiants. Nous entrons, en quelque sorte, dans des désarrois. Celui du vieux Canada, fondateur et blanc et religieux, qui a accueilli l’affirmation exacerbée des différences en se faisant à son tour menaçant. Celui du nouveau Canada, où l’origine étrangère devient une sorte de supériorité morale qui devient à son tour une vigile instituant le soupçon permanent entre les cultures. L’un et l’autre sont victimes d’ennemis imaginaires, d’illusion. L’un et l’ature sont ennemis de la liberté. Neil Bissoondath vit aujourd’hui au Québec dont il préfère le projet cutlurel sans épouser pour autant le projet de souveraineté, , ce qui agacera les esprits bien rangés. origines ethniques 32: rien n’est plus triste, peut-être, qu’un homme à peu sombre sous la neige. 49: Dans None is Too Many, une étude à donner des frissons sur les effets des politiques raciales du Canada sur les Juifs d’Europe, Irving Abella et Harold Troper écrivent: “Si, contrairement aux Etats-Unis, le Canada n’a jamais fixé de quotas à des groups particuliers, le gouvernement appliquait néanmoins une politique d’immigration restrictive avec des préférences ouvertement raciales et ethniques. Soutenu par le public, il savait quels groupes ethniques ou raciaux il voulait et comment s’y prendre pour fermer la porte à ceux dont il ne voulaient pas (…). Les groupes qui ne cadraient pas dans cette conception nationale – en particulier les Juifs, les Asiatiques et les Noirs- étaient le plus souvent relégués au bas des listes” (note: Abella, I. and H. Troper (1991). None is Too Many. Toronto, Lester.) Comme l’a souligné le regretté Ken Adachi dans The Enemy that Never Was (note: Adachi, K. (1976). The Enemy that Never Was. Toronto, McClelland and Stewart.), les citoyens naturalisés d’origine japonaise et leurs enfants nés au Canada se faisaient régulièrement refuser certains droits fodamentaux (…) mais il n’étaient pas exemptés d’impoôts et n’échappaient pas à la conscription. 59-60 (à propos des Sikhs au Canada): Savoir quel est le couvre-chef qui convient est devenu le problème capital de cette fin de siècle. Il serait tenant de dire qu’un pays qui peut entrer en effervescence à propos d’un simple accessoire est un pays heureux. 83-84: Je suis porté à croire qu’un Canadien d’origine italienne et un Canadien d’origine pakistanaise ont probabelement plus en commun que des Italiens et des Pakistais qui n’auraient pas été formés par les normes culturelles de ce pays. (note: i.e. Canada). 103: Le 13 janvien 1994, le juge Raymonde Verreault de la cour du Québec a condamné un homme (…)à 23 mois de prison pour délit à caractère sexuel. (…). Elle fondait sa conclusion sur “le fait que l’accusé n’avait pas eu de relations normales et complètes avec la victime – c’est à dire des relations sexuelles avec pénétration vaginales pour être plus précis – afin de pouvoir préserver sa virginité, ce qui semble être une valeur très importante dans leur religion “(Block, I. (1994). Women outraged by judge’s remarks. The Gazette. Montreal.). L’homme avait préservé la virginité de la fillette en la sodomisant à plusieurs reprises pendant deux ans et demi. (…). L’avocat de la défense, tout en trouvant “incroyables” les commentaires du juge sur l’absence de pénétration vaginale, a par ailleurs loué sa “très, très courageuse” décision. “Elle a reconnu l’existence d’un système de valeurs” a-t-il dit à la Gazette (Baker, G. (1994). Stepdad gets 2 years in sex assault. The Gazette. Montreal.) L’avocat de la défense avait raison, le juge a reconnu effectivement l’existence d’un système de valeurs. Néanmoins, l’un et l’autre ont failli à leur tâche en ne s’interrogeant ni sur les termes de ce système ni sur sa validité. La communauté musulmane de Montréal n’a pas été la seule à condamner le recours à l’islam pour minimiser ce qui est un crime dans toute société. Le juge Verreault a plus tard été sommée de comparaitre devant le Conseil de la Magistrature du Québec (…) 112: L’ethnicité est une façon de décrire les êtres humains selon la race, la religion, la langue, la culture et certains autres traits. Cela permet aux chercheurs et aux responsables de programmes osciaux de mettre un peu d’ordre et de se donner les moyens d’étudier les différences qui partagent l’espèce humaine. L’idée a donc son utilité. La notion d’ethnicité, il faut bien le comprendre, n’est pas une simple question de race. Si les “Blancs” ne formet p as une ethnie, mais que les Danois qui sont tous blancs, en constituent une, il s’ensuit que les jamaicains, qui sont en majorité noirs, en sont une, mais pas les “Noirs”. (pour Boulou: Les communautés noires de la Nouvelle-Ecosse, qui vivent dans ce pays depuis aussi longtemps que les plus anciennes familles blanches, ne peuvent donc pas davantage être considérées comme des groupes “ethniques”. et aussi, p. 124: “De quelle nationalité êtes-vous? – Canadienne. – Non, je veux dire de quelle nationalité êtes vous vraimentI On ne s’habitue jamais tout à fait à ce genre de conversation…) 201: Il y a au Québec, une Association des infirmières noires, une Association des artistes noirs et un Congrès des juristes noirs. Remplacez “noir” par “blanc”, et tout de suite surgit le spectre de l’apartheid. Ce qui est raciste pour les uns l’est fatalement pour les autres. 232: Dans la mesures où ils ne nuisent pas aux autres, ce que les gens font dans leur vie privée ne regarde qu’eux, que ce soit la nourriture qu’ils mangent, les langues et danses folkloriques qu’ils enseignent à leurs enfants, ou qui ils souhaient épouser. plurilinguisme 91-93-Il est parfois étrange de penser que, pour mes arrières-grands-parents, l’anglais était une langue seconde (…). Que je puisse trouver cela étrange en dit long sur les changements qui sont survenus avec les années. Leur vie et leur langue sont maintenant devenues incroyablement étrangères, leurs visages, et même leurs noms, ont depuis longtemps glissé, du moins pour ma génération, dans l’anonymat (…).mon grand-père et l’un de ses frères sont restés fidèles à l’ancienne foi, mais deux de leurs frères se sont convertis (…) ils ont appris à parler l’anglais courramment. Dans une socitété agraire, la chose n’allait pas de soi; toutefois, pour mon grand-père, la lecture quotidienne du journal anglais est devenue un rituel, ses lèvres scandant les mots. Pour mes deux grand-pères, la nouvelle langue offrait la possibilité d’échaper aux travaux éreintants des champs. (…) Le succès avait néanmoins un prix. Pour les parents de mon père, l’hindi n’est devenu finalement rien d’autre qu’une langue réservée à la religion, à la prière, et aux conversations de la vie intime. Dans les deux familles, l’anglais, langue de la réussite, était aussi la langue de communication avec les enfants, avec le résultat que mes p arents ne parlaient pas l’hindi, sauf un mot ici et là, pour exprimer l’affection ou, plus rarement, le mépris. En l’espace de trois générations, donc, la langue de mes arrière-grands-parents avait presque disparu, et qavec elle aviat pris fin un mode de vie réglé sur la terre et des croyances religieuses. Nous n’éprouvions aucun sentiment de perte, aucune espèce de regret, aucun attachement romantique à une langue qui n’avait plus d’utilité. Ceux de la génération de mes parents qui restaient accorchés au passé -les quelques femmes qui ne portaient que le sari, les quelques hommes qui retournaient en Inde se chercher des épouses- ont fini par passer pour excentriques et déraisonnables. Mon propre univers était très différent de ceuilui dans lequel avait grandi mes parents. Alors que pour eux, poursuivre des études à l’étranger représentait un long et noble voyage, (…), ma génération n’y voyait qu’une étape d’un processus normal d’évolution. (…). ma seule langue était l’anglais et, dans une île qui n’avait obtenu son indépendance que depuis dix ans, mes influences en matière de culture populaire étaient moins britanniques ou indiennes qu’américaines plurilinguisme et multiculturalisme 53-55: En 1971, alors que son gouvernement glissait dans l’impopularité (du en grande partie à la politique du bilinguisme qui avait été mal expliquée et appliquée sans discernement), Pierre Trudeau jeta les bases d’une politique qui allait pour toujours changer la face du pays, celle du multiculturalisme. “La politique du gouvernement fédéral en matière de multiculturalisme consiste à reconnaître que le multiculturalisme reflète la diversité culturelle et raciale de la société canadienne et reconnaît la libert éde tous ses membres de maintenir, de favoriser et de partager leur patrimoine culturel, ainsi qu’à sensibiliser la population à ce fait”. (art. 3.1 Canada (1990). Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien, Guide à l’intention des Canadiens. Ottawa.) Il est difficile de ne pas se demander si le silence dont il l’entoure ne pourrait pas servir à mesurer le niveau de son engagement intellectuel en sa faveur. L’opinion du journaliste Richard Gwyn est pour le moins tranchée “Après 1972, Trudeau ne cherchait plus à faire ce qui était juste, rationnellement, mais ce qui était politiquement avantageux (…). Il avait été accusé de vouloir écarrter les ethnies? Il instaurait une politique multiculturelle inflationiste fonctionnant comme une sorte de caisse occulte où on puisait l’argent pour acheter les votes ethniques.” (Gwyn, R. (1980). The Northern Magus. Toronto, McClelland and Stewart, p. 139.). L’accusation est claire. Le multiculturalisme aurait été institué non pas comme politique sociale progressiste, non pas tant comme une réponse à une demande de compromis social que comme une réacation à une situation politique tendue. Si l’importance accordée au bilinguisme avait semb lé favoriser le Québec francophone aux dépens du reste du pays, le multiculturalisme allait pouvoir être présenté comme une manière de balancer les comptes politiques. (…) René Lévesque rejetait carrément les règles du jeu multiculturel. “Le multiculturalisme, en réalité, c’est du folklore. C’est une diversion. C’est une notion inventée pour obscurcir la question du Québec, pour créer l’impression que nous somme tous des ethnies et n’avons pas à nous inquiéter d’un statut spécial pour le Québec” (Colombo, J. R., Ed. (1991). The Dictionary of Canadian Quotations (René Lévesque). Toronto, Stoddart). Cette opiinion est partagée par le politologue Christian Dufour qui, dans Le Défi Québécois, explique ainsi l’avènement du multiculturalisme: “Le multiculturalisme fut adopté pour deux raisons. Il s’agissait de répondre aux attentes des immigrants arrviés en Ontario après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, dont l’assimilation n’était pas complétée. Mais c’était également un moyen déviter de reconnaître le biculturalisme du pays et d’admettre les cconséquences politiques de la spécificité québécoise. Le multiculturalisme réduit en principle le fait québécois à un phénomène ethnique” ( Dufour, Christian, Le Défi Québécois, (Montreal: L’Hexagone, 1989). 75: Qu’elle s’attaque au déficit, aux coûts des programmes sociaux, à l’immigration, au multiculturalisme ou au bilinbuisme, la droite exprime une conception nostalgique de l’époque où chaque budget produisait un surpus, où l’homme était le soutien de la famille, oû les nouveaux arrivants étaient surtout blancs (des immigrants “traditionnels”), où les minorités savaient se tenir à leur place et où tout le monde parlait anglais. 222: La société multiculturelle a eu tendance à réduire le rôle et l’autonomie de l’individu en cherchant à confiner les individus à l’intérieur de lilmites précises et fortement tributaires des stéréotypes. Le rôle positif que l’ethnicité -les antécédents ethniques, cutlurels et historique- pourrait jouer dans la création du moi en est devenu confus. Au printemps 1994, le Mirror a publié un court article qui résumait mes réserves au sujet du multiculturalisme. Un lecteur a répondu en expliquant que le multiculturalisme lui avait permis de se faire une idée de qui il était et d’où il venait: auparavant il ne savait rien de ses antécédents culturels, et jamais on ne lui avait enseigné la langue de ses ancêtres. 230: Dans un article publié dans le Globe and Mail du 18 juillet 1991, le docteur Suwanda Sugunasiri, un ancien membre de l’Ontario Advisory Council on Multiculturalism and Citizenship, demandait au gouvernement fédéral d’abolir le Secrétairat au multiculturalisme, qui relève actuellement du Secrétariat d’Etat, de l’incorporer au ministère de la Culture et des Communications et de mettre l’accent sur la lutte contre le racism. Il demandait aussi la dissolution duComité consultatif canadien du multiculturalisme, la fin des programmes d’aide financière et techniques, dont celui des langues ancestrales (…). A son avis, cette politqiue a fait son temps et, dans sa forme actuelle, n’a plus de raison d’être. 55: La loi “reconnaît l’existence de collectivités dont les membres partagent la même origine et leur contribution à l’histoire du pays” et promet de “favoriser leur développement”; elle vise à “promouvoir la compréhension entre individus et collectivités d’origines différentes et la créativité qui résulte des échanges entre eux” et engage le gouvernement fédéral à “favoriser la reconnaissance et l’estime réciproque des diverses cultures du pays”. Elle parle d'”encourager et (d)’aider les institutions sociales, culturelles, économiques et politiques canadiennes à prendre en compte le caractère multiculturel du Canada. (art. 3.1 Canada (1990). Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien, Guide à l’intention des Canadiens. Ottawa.) 94-95: Il y a quelque chose de tape-à-l’oeil et de séduisant dans le multiculturalisme canadien; il se manifeste dans la joie et la bonne humeur, par le stéréotype du canada traditionnel dans les festivals “ethniques” qui ont lieu partout à travers le pays. Au festival Caravan de Toronto, par exemple, divers groupes réservent une place dans des églises ou des centres communautraires pour mettre sur pied des “pavillons” auxquels on accède en achetant un “passeport” (…) 96: il en va des cultures présentées dans les pavillons du festival Caravan et d’autres festivals du même genre comme de tous ces personnages colorés d’ethnies différentes qui saluent de leur sourire mécanique les touristes qui passent, pour la plupart eux-même des “ethniques” Ils ont l’air authentique, mais l’odeur qui s’en dégage est artificielle. Ils n’ont aucun relief. Ils sont sans danger. La culture dysneyifiée. 145: Tout pays qui ne réclame pas la totale allégeance de ses citoyens, tout pays qui les acceuille à bras ouverts alors que ceux-ci le traitent comme s’il sagissait de toilettes publiques -c’est à dire un endroit oû l’on se précipite en cas d’urgence- s’expose à un névaste affaiblissement intérieur. Il est peut-être inévitable que pour plusieurs nouveaux arrivants le Canada se réume à un emploi. Il est triste à pleurer cependant qu’après plusieurs annes les choses en soient toujours là; et il est plus triste que les enfants de ces immigrants continuent de voir le Canada avec les yeux de l’étranger. En mettant l’accent sur l’attachement à la patrie d’origine, à la terre de ses ancètres, en insistant sur le fait que là-bas est plus important qu’ici le multiculturalisme nourrit de telles attitudes. En démocratie, toute loi qui essaierait de résoudre ce type de problème doit être honnie; elle ne serait qu’un geste de nature tyrannique et cel ne serait d’ailleurs d’aucune utilité. Bein qu’il n’y ait pas lieu ici de légiférer, les politiciens n’en ont pas moins un rôle essentiel à jouer. Le multiculturalisme, s’il a vraiment pour but de structurer la société canadienne, devrait adopter des mesures qu encoragent l’engagement envers le pays plutôt que l’exploitation de celui-ci. Salman Rushdie a sevi l’avertissement suivant la communauté littéraire indo-britannique: “de tous les nombreux pièges à éléphants qui nous attendent, la fosse la plus profonde et la plus dangeureuse serait d’adopter une mentalité de ghetto. Oublier qu’il existe un monde au-delà de la communauté à laquelle nous appartenons, nous enfermer à l’intérieur de frontières culturelles étroitement définies, serait à mon avis entrer dans cette forme d’exil intérieur qu’en afrique du sud on appelle les “homelands” . Nous devons nous garder de créer, pour des raisons les plus vertueuses, des équivalents (…) du Bophuthatswana et du Transkei” (Rushdie, Salman. Patries imaginaires. Trans. A. Chatelin. Paris: Bourgois, 1993: 30. De ce point de vue, le multiculturalisme nous a mal servis, parce qu’il nous a fait tomber dans le piège é éléphant de l’ethnicité et l’a refermé solidement derrière nous. spécificités québécoises 18: Un mois après la publication de sondages (mars 94, 4 canadiens sur 10 pensent qu’il y a trop de membres des minorités visibles au Canada), les députés du B loc québécois et du Parti réformiste, alors qu’ils critiquaient les subventions fédérales accordées aux commuautés ethniques en faisant valoir que cette aide favorisait la formation de thettos, ont été accusés d’abord de vouloir importer l’idéologie du “melting pot” américain au Canada, puis de faire preuve de xénophobie. Les multiples tentatives du parti réformiste pour mettre le multiculturalisme à l’ordre du jour des travaux de la chambre ont invariablement abouti à des accusations de racisme. 73: L’homogénéité du Canada, qui a subsisté aussi longtemps qu’on a pu fermer les yeux sur ses minorités, n’existe plus. Il est de plus en plus difficile d’imaginer que le pays est, ou fut, “chrétien et blanc”. S’il a déjà été “britannique” au sens culturel du terme, il le demeure seulement dans quelques forteresses qui glissent péniblement vers les pages de l’histoire. Dire que le pays est essentiellement “britannique”, c’est déjà ignorer la culture et l’histoire du Canada français. Il est donc possible que l’éclipse du Canada (anglais) traditionnel ne soit pas accidentelle, et que sa réduction au statut d’Etat “ethnique” fasse partie d’un ajustement nécessaire et implicite de la psychologie qui, selon Christian Dufour, a dicté les relations entre les Anglais et les Françaisfs depuis 1759, date de la chute de Québec aux mains du générale Wolfe. Le Canada est, selon Dufour, un pays “bâti sur la Conquête”: “On se montre souvent étonné de ce que les Québécois prétendent être encore affeté par un événement survenu il y a plus de 200 ans (…). C’est qu’on oublie alors la différence de nature entre une défaite et une conqu’ete (…). Contrairement au vaincu, le conquis est atteint au cueour même de son identité collective; il devient la chose du conquérant, qui fera de lui ce qu’il voudra. Que le conquérant soit magnanime ne change rien à cette réalité. Cela rend au contraire la conquête plus humiliante, car les conquis doivent être en plus reconnaissants”.(Dufour, Christian. Le Défi Québécois. Montreal: L’Hexagone, 1989, p. 28). 203: “C’est la nature cosmopolite de Montréal qui lui assurera un avenir. Je ne parle pas des restaurants exotiques, des boutiques à la mode ou des cafés; j’entends une population qui provient de toutes les parties du monde, pour qui le français est un fait naturel, l’anglais un moyen commode de communication, et qui produira une culture diversifiée greffée à un tronc francophone”(Godbout, Jacques. “(à propos de Montréal).” Globe and Mail 1989.) 208: Aux yeux des Canadiens, écrit Lise Bissonnette, qui aiment penser qu’ils vivent selon les canons officiels du multiculturalisme, la culture québécoise n’est qu’une des giges d’un grand bouquet multiculolre qui s’épanouit d’un océan à l’autre. (Bissonnette, Lise. “ Culture, politique et société au Québec.” (Graham Spry Lecture 1990) . Conférence prononcée au Centre canadien d’architecture: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 1990.) Si l’un des buts du multiculturalisme était de faire des Québécois un groupe ethnique parmi d’autes, de réduire le caractère distinct de son histoire et de sa place dans la confédération à un statut égal à celui des autres provinces, alors il l’a en grande partie atteint -du moins à l’extérier du Québec. J’en veux pour preuve le refus d’accorder au Québec un statut constitutionnel particulier et l’entêtement à n’y voir qu’une pronvince égale aux autres, dotée des mêmes pouvoirs, des mêmes droits et des même obligations. Cependant, il s’agit là d’une conception un peu simpliste de l’égalité. Il devrait être évident, même pour quelqu’un qui n’en a qu’une connaissance vague, que le Québec est différent. Il a des obligations toucang sa langue, sa culture, son mode de vie- que les autres provinces n’ont pas. Or, quand on a des obligations particulières, on a aussi beoin de pouvoirs spéciaux pour s’en acquitter. Si au contraire, les Québécois ne constituent qu’un groupe ethnique parmi d’autres, leurs besoins peuvent alors être, du moins politiquement, niés en toute quiétude. discours académique multiculture, politiquement correct 18: Quiconque critique le multuiculturalisme est donc immédiatement accusé de racisme. Et s’ill est, comme j e le suis, une “personne de couleur”, il devient un “vendu”, un “traitre”, ou le “nègre de service” tant pour les “ethniques” qui défenent leurs intrérêts dans le système, que pour les apôtres du multiculturalisme, qui s’attendaient à un peu plus de reconnaissance. 19: Tout comme l’Etat soviétique répondait à ses critiques en les traitant de malades mentaux, l’appareil multiculturaliste canadien répond aux siens en les taxant de racisme. C’est une façon simple, et, du point de vue idéologique, naturelle de congédier les vérités qui dérangent. C’est d’ailleurs ce qui confère au multiculturalisme ses apparences de cultue: les règles sont clairement établies, et c’est seulement à vos risques et prérils que vous les remettez en question. 20: Il y a plusieurs moyens d’atteindre une même fin. En l’occurrence, il appartient à ceux qui souhaitent une société authentiquement pluraliste de préciser l’idée qu’il s’en font avec des mots qui soient plus que la simple expression de la bonne volonté. Il imjporte aussi qu’ils ne s’enfermenet pas dansune espèce de bonne conscience qui leur ferait écarter la critique du revers de la main, et qui aurait pour effet non suelmeent de jeter le discrédit sur leurs idées, mais aussi d’abîmer le tissu social que ces idées prétendent servir. 39: Officiellement, juridiquement, le Canada était un pays multiculturel. Ici, disaient-ils vous n’aviez pas à changer. Ici vous pouviez et c’était en fait votre devoir- rester celui que vous étiez. Rien de l’insensé melting pot américain, pas besoin de se refaire une identité conforme aux nouvelles circonstances, vous n’aviez pas à vous adapter à la socitété, c ‘est la société qui avait l’obligation de s’ajuster à vous. 94: la culture est chose complexe, qui vit, respire, en constante évolution. La culture, c’est la vie. Elle se transforme sans cesse, n’est jamais la même d’un jour à l’autre. Il n’y a pas de repos possible. Une culture qui n’arrive plus à trouver en elle l’énergie de la vie se trahit; inévitablement elle sombre dans le folklore. Une culture est faite de petites et de grandes choses. C’est préférer le café plutôt que le thé, la bière plutôt que le vin; les filmes plutôt que les livres, les téléromans plutôt que les documentaires; le libre-échange plutôt que le protectionnisme, le repliement sur toi plutôt que l’ouverture; le changement négocié plutôt que la révolution armée. Rien n’est sans conséquence. La culture doit être considérée dans ses plus petits détails. On doit tenir compte de la respiration même d’un peuple, autrement on le banalise, lui et son histoire, on le réduit au plus commun des dénominateurs. A un stéréotype. Aucun des effets de la politique du multiculturalisme n’est aussi paradoxal -ou aussi involontaire- que celui que j’appellerais la simplification des cultures. 96: Assister à un festival culturel, ce n’est pas s’ouvrir à la culture, mais regarder un spectacle; on n’y prend pas un bain d’histoire, on nage dans l’imaginaire. Ce n’est pas désagréable, sans doute, mais c’est d’une signification douteuse. Vous en sortirez sans rien avoir appris de la langue et de la littérature de ces pays, peu de choses de leur passé et de leur présent -sans parler du fait que ce vous avez vu a vraisemblablement été conçu à des fins politiques évidentes. Vous n’avez rien appris de la vie quotidienne -de la culture- de ces gens, mais vous ne pouvez plus douter qu’ilss sont tous, les uns autant que les autres, ouverts, sincères, et qu’ils aiment s’amuser. 111: En exergue au chap.6 (de l’usage de l’ethnicité): Le culte de l’Ethnicité exacère les différences, intensifie les ressentiments et les antagonismes, enfonce le coin toujours plus loin entre les races et les nationalités. Le résultant est l’apitoiement sur son sort et le repli volontaire, vécu comme une mise à l’écart par la société, un “ghetto” symbolique. Schlesinger Jr, Arthur M. La désunion de l’Amérique. 153: Selon Vernon Farrell, président de l’Afran-Heritage Eductors Network, que cite M. Foster, “des écoles conçues pour les Noirs amèneraient les étudiants à réfléchir sur leur histoire, reurs relations sociales, leurs croyances, leurs pratiques et leurs réactions collectives au réalités politiques et économiques. Par-dessus tout, ils pourraient développer un sens de leur identité, une conscience critique et un sentiment d’appartenance”. Toutes choses, en d’autres mots, que le multiculturalisme devait favoriser, mais qu’il n’a pas réussi à accomplir. 160: Plus récemment, le romancier Alberto Manguel a raconté une expérience (…). Invité à écrire l’introduction à un livre sur l’expérience de l’immigration, il rappelait que, longtemps, “Le Canada avait été perçu comme la terre des bons sauvages”. A sa grande surprise, “sauvages” avait été remplacé par “autochtones”. L’éditeur, “pour quoi le mot “sauvage” était absolument inacceptable” ne connaissait vraisemblablement pas le concept du bon sauvage en usage ua XVIIIè siècle auquel se référait Manguel. “Changer la terminologie, a dit ce dernier, embellir l’idée en remplaçant “sauvage” par “autochtone” est une tentative arrogante de modifier l’histoire (…). La langue est intimement liée à la société qui l’emploie; les mots que nous utilisions autrefois nous définissent autant que ceux que nous utilisons aujourd’hui. 178: L’appropriation culturelle. Cette tendance à la division s’est d’abord manifestée en 1987 (…). Certaines personnes s’opposaient é l’inclusion de quelques textes dans un recueil de nouvelles. Le problème était relativement simple: la narratrice de certaines nouvelles était noire alors que l’auteur était blanche.(…)- Ce n’était qu’un début. Bientôt apparurent d’autres exigences: les Blancs ne devaient pas écrire sur les Noirs, les hommes ne devaient pas écrire sur les femmes, les non-autochtones sur les autochtones etc. Le raisonnement reposait sur l’idée que, si on a pas vécu certaines expériences, on n’a pas le droit d’en parler. L’écrivain qui ose explorer un teritoire qui n’est pas le sien commet un vol; il s’expose à se faire accuser de raciste, de sexiste et d’impérialiste par ceux qui refusent d’être montrés sous un jour qui n’est pas celui qu’ils auraient choisi eux-mêmes pour se dépeindre -il est notoire que les autoportairts ont tendance à être exempts d’imperfections…

multiculturalisme d’état: multiculturalisme canadien/multiculturalisme d’état

15: Les résultats de deux sondages ont, il y a quelque temps, causé un certain émoi. Le premier, mené par Decima Research pour le compte du Conseil canadiendes chrétiens et des juifs, a été rapporté dans l’édition du 14 décembre 1993 du Globe and Mail avec la manchette suivante: “Les Canadiens veulent voir disparaître la mosaîque multiculturelle et croient que les immigrants devraient adopter les valeurs du pays” . Et le texte se poursuivait ainsi: “La plupart des Canadiens pensent que la mosaïque multicultuelle ne donne pas les réultats escomptés et qu’elle devrait être remplacée par un melting pot culturel. Environ 72% des personnes interrogées sont d’avis que l’image d’un  pays formé de communautés à l’intérieur duquel chaque groupe ethnique et racial préserve son identité grâce aux politiques gouvernementales doit céder la place au mode d’intégration pratiqué aux Etats-Unis. Le sondage (…) indique que les Canadiens sont “de plus en plus fatigués” des demandes des groupes ethniques et qu’ils sont mécontents du “manque d’harmonie” à l’intérieur de la société. “ils manifestent, dit le sondage, une préférence marquée pour l'”homogénéisation” de la société grâce à l’adoption, par les immigrants, des valeurs et du mode de vie du Canada”(Kapica, Jack. “Canadians want mosaïc to melt, survey finds: Respondents believe immigrants should adopt Canada’s values.” The Globe and Mail 1993.) 16: La Gazette de Montréal qui, le même jour, rapporte également la nouvelle met l’accent sur l’interprétation de l’enquête plutot que sur ses résultats, sous la manchette: “les Canadiens affichent des attitudes “racistes latentes”. La majorité rejette la diversité culturelle et pense que les grou0pes ethniques devraient tenter de s’intégrer” (Jeffs, Allyson. “Canadians Harbor “latently Racist” Attitudes: Poll.” Southam News 14 décembre 1993). Notre pays a développé une édpendance aux longues et laborieuses études. Il n’existe sans doute plus de sujets qui n’aient été la cible d’une consutation populaire. Nous répondons sans pudeur aux questions les pus intimes, nous croyons aux commissions d’enquêtes, aux longs mois d’audiences, aux montgnes de rapports de recherche, généralement trop volumineux pour être lus même pas lreplus boulimique des lecteurs, et je ne parle pas des sondages d’opinion dont l’abondance rebute les journalistes les plus aguerris. 17: On serait porté à croire que toute cette application aurait au moins du nous en apprendre un peu plus sur nous-mêmes. Mais la connaissance qu’on a de soi ne vient pas seulement de l’étude. Elle repose sur le savoir historique, sur l’examen de soi, sur des débats ouverts et vivants, sur la rance confrontation des points de vue. Or, trop souvent, nous en restons à sa surface des choses, et c’est ainsi que les sondages qui prétendent prendre notre pouls peuvent toujours nous surprendre et nous consterner. Or, peu de silences sont aussi éloquents que celui qui, dans ce pays, entoure le culte que nous vouons au multiculturalisme. Selon la Gazette, la secrétaire d’Etat au multiculturalisme, Sheila Finestone aurait dit, commentant le sondage Decima, que “les libéraux n’entendaient pas battre en retraite en cette matière. Au contraire, elle promettait de mettre l’accent sur la sensibilisation (…) Mme Finestone aurait poursuivi en dénonçant les coupables: la fragilité de l’économie (qui favorise la chasse aux boucs émissaires) et les préjugés raciaux, exacerbés par Preston Manning et son parti. Comme d’autres, Mme Finestone n’a pas hésité à établir un lien entre l’opposition au multiculturalisme et les tendances racistes. Un mois après la publication des sondages, les députés du Bloc Québécois et du parti réformistes, alors qu’ils critiquaient les subventions fédérales accordées aux communautés ethniques en faisant valoir que cette aide favorisait la formation de ghettos, ont été acccusés d’aborde de vouloir faire preuve de “melting pot” américain au Canada, puis de faire preuve de xénophobie. 32: On m’a souvent demandé, comme à plusieurs nouveaux arrivants, les raison de ce choix (aller au Canada). C’est toujours un Canadien de naissance qui posait cette question, et elle laissait entendre que, quelle que soit la raison, j’avais commis une erreur. La réponse est pourtant simple. Le Canada m’a été recommandé par un membre éminent de ma famille, qui y voyait un bons compromis entre deux autres destinations possibles, l’Angleterre et les Etats-Unis. 46: J’ai l’impression qu’un changement s’est produit au moment où une génération succédait à l’autre. Pour les vagues d’immigration plus ancienne, l’intégration signifiait l’apprentissage de la langue, des valeurs, de la culture -et il y avait dans cette appropriation quelque chose de sacré. Mon père pouvait encore raconter comment c’était, en 1935, pour un jeune universitaire, de faire la queue à l’hôtel de ville de Toronto poru prêter le serment d’allégeance au Canada: il avait le sentiment que c’était un très important rite de passage, ce qui a toujours fait de lui un Canadien extrêmement patriotique. 47: (à propos du statut de Westminster de 1931 donnant au Canada le plein pouvoir en matière de politique étrangère t intérieure) Dans l’ensemble, le pays cherchait à sauvegarder son homogénéité ethnique et culturelle. Les populations autgochtomes étaient cantonnées dans des réserves, les petites communautés noires étaient efficacement isolées de la vie courante, et l’entreé au Canada de personnes considérées comme indésirables pour des motifs raciaux ou ethniques était sévèrement limitée. On acceuillait volontiers les Blancs américains, mais pas les Noirs. On exigeait de tous des frais de débarquement de vingt-cinq ou cinquante dollars- sauf des Asiatiques à qui on en demandait deux cents. En 1923, cette règle a été supprimée -sauf encore une fois pour les Asiatiques, qui devaient maintenant payer une taxe de deux cent cinquante dollars “par tête”, mesure qui visait exclusivement à réduire leur nombre. 51: Le plus souvent, les lois suivent l’évolution de la société; elles jouent un jeu de rattrapage législatif. (…)La loi résolvait un problème collectif; elle était fondée sur un consensus réel et le fait qu’elle répondit aux désirs des citoyens lui conférait sa légitimité. Sous cet angle, les lois suivent le sillage irrégulier de la société. Dans une société démocratique, les lois sont souvent engendrées par l’événement 53: On attendait beaucoup de Trudeau. Il allait régénérer le pays, et l’unifier. (…)On a vu naître de grandes idées à Ottawa, elles ont produit une avalanche d’études mais, selon les observateurs, de bien minces résultats. Après trois années de son premier mandat à la tête du gouvernement , la rose s’est fanée, et la trudeaumanie s’est transformée en trudeauphobie. On a commencé à redouter un second mandat . En 1971, alors que son gouvernement glissait dans l’impopularité (due en grande partie à la politique du bilinguisme qui avait été mal expliquée et appliquée sans discernement), Pierre Trudeau jeta les bases d’une politique qui allait pour toujours hanger la face du pays, celle du multiculturalisme. “La politique du gouvernement fédéral en matière de multiculturalisme consiste à reconnaître que le multiculturalisme reflète la diversité culturelle et raciale de la société canadienne et reconnaît la liberté de tous ses membres de maintenir, de favoriser et de partager leur patrimoine culturel, ainsi qu’à sensibiliser la pupulation à ce fait” (Canada. Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien, Guide à l’intention des Canadiens. Ottawa, 1990: 13.) Il semble donc curieux que Pierre Trudeau, qui, dans ses mémoires, défend énergiquement le bilinguisme, n’y mentionne jamais le multiculturalisme. L’opinion du journaliste Richard Gwyn est pour le moins tranchée: “Après 1972, Trudeau ne cherchait plus à faire ce qui était juste, rathionnellement, mais ce qui était politiquement avantageux. (…) Il avait été accusé de vouloir écarter les ethnies? Il instaurait une politique multiculturelle inflationniste fonctinnant comme une sorte de caisse occulte où on puisait l’argent pour acheter les votes ethniques” (Gwyn, Richard. The Northern Magus. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1980: 139) L’accusation est claire. Le multiculturalisme aurait été institué non pas comme politique sociale progressiste, mais comme mesure politicienne opportuniste, non pas tant comme une réponse à une demande de compromis social que comme une réaction à une situation politique tendue. Si l’importance accordée au bilinguisme avait semblé favoriser le Québec francophone aux dépens du reste du pays, le multiculturalisme allait pouvoir être présenté comme une manière de balancer les comptes politiques. Le gouvenrment imaginatif et dynamique de l’élection de 1968 s’est transformé en parti calculateur luttant pour sa survie politique. 54-55: René Lévesque rejetait carrément les règles du jeu multiculturel. “Le multiculturalisme, en réalité, c’est du folklore. C’est une diversion. C’est une notion inventée pour obscurcir la question du Québec, pour créer l’impression que nous sommes tous des ethnies et n’avons pas à nous inquiéter d’un statut spécial pour le Québec”. 55: Cette opinion est partagée par le politologue Christian Dufour qui, dans Le Défi Québécois, explique ainsi l’avènement du multiculturalisme: “Le multiculturalisme fut adopté pour deux raisons. Il s’agissait de répondre aux attentes des immigrants arrivés en Ontario après la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, dont l’assimilation n’était pas complétée. Mais c’était également un moyen d’éviter de reconnaître le biculturalisme du pays et d’admettre les conséquences politiques de la spécificité québécoise. Le multiculturalisme réduit en principe le fait québécois à un phénomène ethnique”. (Dufour, Christian. Le Défi Québécois. Montreal: L’Hexagone, 1989: 77). “Une sorte de caisse occulte où on puisait l’argent pour acheter les votes ethniques”, réduire le Québec à un “phénomène ethnique”: on offrait aux immigrants naturalisés, aux Canadiens “ethniques”, un trait d’union (et des subsides gouvernementaux) en échange de quoi on attendait d’eux qu’ils se laissent manipuler comme des pions dans la vieille épreuve de force entre Canadiens francophones et anglopones. Pour une politique qui semblait à première vue empreinte d’humanisme, le constat est plutôt triste et affligeant. Mais c0est aussi une opinion qui, dans l’atmosphère de méfiance qui enveloppe l’épreuve de force en question, présente des apparence de vérité. Cela dit, m’eme une programme qui a pour but la manipulatoin peut faire preuve de sensibilité et de sincérité. La loi sur la préservation et le développement du multiculturalisme au Canada, mieux connue comme Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien, est peut-être seulement une anthologie de “boniments”. C’est en tout cas un document qui cherche à séduire par la répétition de généralités de bons ton et qui déborde de bonnes intentions. 77: Dans The New Canada, son autobiographie politique, Preston Manning (…) parvient à introduire un élément entièrement nouveau dans la discussion: pour al première fois à ma connaissance, les peuples autochtones du Canada sont présentés comme un groupe ethnique parmi d’autres, ce qui est une façon commode d’esquiver la demande de réapration des trahisons historiques et la question de la reconnaissance des droits territoriaux. 89: Les insultes et les stéréotypes ne contribuent en rien à faire avancer le débat et, avec leur simplicité injurieuse, on obscurcit la vraie complexité de la quesiton qui est celle de la disparition d’un consensus culturel. Pour reprendre les thermes de Michael Valpy, “à tort ou à raison, beaucuoup de Canadiens croient que le multiculturalisme signifie qu’il n’y a pas de culture canadienne reconnue ou protégée et, à cette inquiétude, les gouvernements n’ont apporté aucune réponse. Au contraire, ils ont transformé le multiculturalisme en crédo d’Etat politically correct” (Valpy, Michael. “A fear of losing the old Canada.” The Globe and Mail 11 mars 1994 ). 150: L’excision est un rite de passage pour les femmes tchadiennes. En la réprouvant, condamnons-nous des groupes ethniques, cherchons-nous à leur imposer des valeurs déplacées de leur contexte, “eurocentriques” (…). Et qu’en est-il de ces cultures où il est vital d’avoir une progéniture mâle? (…)Le multiculturalisme prend fin là où commencent les notions de droits de la personne et de la dignité -c’est là qu’apparaît également l’épineuse question des limites. La loi sur le multiculturalisme ne trace aucune frontière au-delà de laquelle le compromis conclu entre des pratiques culturelles différentes ne tiendrait plus. 151: Jusqu’où le multiculturalisme peut-il aller? Le Canada peut-il satisfaire aux requêtes de citoyens dont l’allégeance ne tiendrait pas compte des lois en vigueur? 222: Le multiculturalisme, c’est l’ethnicité en tant que politique publique: c’est l’idée que se fait la société de la place qui est assignée à l’individu à l’intérieur de sa structure. Pour ma part, je préfère croire que la véritable valeur de l’ethnicité réside dans l’idée contraire: ce ne serait que l’un des nombreux étléments qui déterminent la manière dont l’individu conçoit le monde. 224: A première vue, le multiculturaalisme veut promouvoir la diversité – une diversité très conformiste, pourrait-on rétorquer. En faisant le commerce de l’exotisme, il voit l’individu non pas comme un membre de la société mais comme un élément d’un pous petit groupe défini en fonction de l’ethnie, de la race ou de la culture.

Biton, M. (2012). keynote speech as the Mayor of Yerucham. J Street: Making History, Washington D.C.

In 1970, Israel was poorer in resources but richer in solidarity. We need borders within which we can build Isreael. Conversation has been taken by extremists. It’s not popular to be a supporter of Peace in Israel today. Those who oppose peace lack answers. In Yerusham, our closest neighbourhoods are bedouin settlements. We are tirelessly aiming at bridging the gap. We need to acknowledge the change of pace of Israeli society. We need to stop pouring resources into Judea and Samaria! While settlements are an obstacle to peace, settlers are not our enemies. How can we insure a democratic Israel? I spent 5 of my best years serving in the territories. I don’t want my kids to waste their best years for territories!

Blake, N.F. 1996. A History of the English Language. New York: New York University Press.

Blake, W. (1757-1827). "Jerusalem."

Block, Irwin. 1994. Women outraged by judge’s remarks. The Gazette, 15 janvier.

cité par Bissoondath, N. (1995). Le Marché aux Illusions: la méprise du multiculturalisme. Montréal, Boréal, p. 103

Bloom, David , and Gilles Grenier. 1992. Earnings of the French Minority in Canada and the Spanish Minority in the US. In Immigration, Language and Ethnicity, edited by B. Chiswick. Washington D.C.: The AEI Press.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1933. Language. New York: Holt.

Board, Oakland School. 1997. OAKLAND’S AFRICAN AMERICAN TASK FORCE IS ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF EDUCATIONAL REFORM. Oakland.

OAKLAND, CA – In an ongoing effort to address the changing needs of Oakland’s public school children, the Task Force on the Education of African American Students released its report on Friday, May 2, 1997 detailing the 5-year implementation plan to improve educational opportunities for the District’s African American student population which represents 53% of the total enrollment. The 23-page report includes 8 recommendations for “Educational Program Outcomes” which emphasizes parents, teachers, staff, the community, local businesses, and the task force’s involvement in students’ education. The goal of our Implementation Plan is to improve students’ educational outcomes,” commented Task Force Chairman Sylvester Hodges. “Our focus is, and has always been, on the development of long-range strategies to improve academic achievement for African American students. Enhanced English language development is just one component in a multi-faceted approach to improve public education in Oakland schools.” The first year of the Implementation Plan will concentrate on pre-schoolers in the District’s Child Development Centers and children in kindergarten through the 3rd grade. Sixth and ninth grade students will also be targeted for comprehensive educational improvements. “The budget for this plan is quite modest, considering its potential results and impact on the community. The development of the budget has taken into consideration that the District has limited resources. The budget for the Implementation Plan will reflect a re-prioritization of existing services and will include a combination of Title 1 funds currently allocated to the SEP Program, supplemented by voluntary desegregation, and general funds,” said Superintendent Carolyn Getridge. “Schools are competing for the minds of our children. In Oakland, we are committed to rigorous performance standards that will prepare students to learn, and contend for employment in the 21st Century.” A Community Coordinator is being proposed to serve as liaison between the District, parents and the community. Volunteers, mentors and tutors will all play a distinct role in the Implementation Plan. Homework centers, Saturday school, community service, Junior Achievement, and special workshops are slated for students. Aggressive recruitment of African American teachers, and support staff, training and staff development, new techniques in classroom management, and a focus on teaching as a career in Oakland will be emphasized. New instructional materials, textbook adoption criteria, enforcement of attendance and uniform policies, review of the District’s policies regarding its Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) and special education referral and monitoring processes, training in conflict mediation between staff and students, and a peer mentoring program are included in the Plan. “These changes are relevant to the evolving needs of our students. The gaps in learning between African American and our other students were too glaring for us, as educational policy makers, to ignore,” said Toni Cook of the Oakland Board of Education. “The talent is there. We will use technology, parent/community partnership collaboration, business roundtables — any tools within our means — to broaden our students skills in math, science and language arts.” Additionally, school-to-career resources will be highlighted including business training seminars, field trips, apprenticeships and preparation for post-high school employment and summer jobs. Finally, the plan supports a partnership between the District and the City of Oakland to promote children’s education, healthy growth and development as community citizens; and, a research component to capture the effectiveness of the recommendations and to help maximize the benefits to Oakland. “Our goal is to graduate students who are prepared with the knowledge and skills they’ll need to compete in the global workforce. We have raised our academic standards for students, our professional development expectations for teachers and administrators, and established methods to include parents, the community, government, and business as part of the process,” commented Oakland School Board President Jean Quan. Prior to final acceptance of the plan, it will be reviewed by the Board of Education’s Business & Facilities, Personnel, and Curriculum Sub-Committees which is a public process.

Body-Gendrot, Sophie. 1991. Les Etats-Unis et leurs immigrants. Edited by I. Crucifix. Vol. 4941, Les études de la documentation Française. Paris: la documentation Française.

Bolkestein, Frits, and Michel Rocard. 2006. Peut-on réformer la France? Paris: Autrement.

Abstract de France culture (Finkielkraut, Alain. 2007. Emission Répliques du 24 février 2007: L’héritage de Pierre Mendès France. Paris: France Culture. émission radiophonique):Frits Bolkestein et Michel Rocard, acteurs de premier plan de la vie politique nationale et européenne, forts de leur expérience, parlent sans tabous de la France, de ses blocages, de ses ridicules, de ses spécificités et de ses réussites.

Autour de trois thèmes, « La France et l’Europe », « La France et la mondialisation », « La France avec elle-même », les deux hommes analysent, en partant de tous les sujets chauds, syndicalisme, « non » à l’Europe du 29 mai 2005, poussée des extrêmes, crispations identitaires, montée des inégalités, effroi de la mondialisation, les fondements de notre société et les moyens d’en sortir. Renouant avec l’authentique débat politique dans ce qu’il a de plus riche, les deux hommes politiques, qui s’aperçoivent qu’ils ont des accords souterrains, n’en restent pas moins en désaccord sur le fond des choses, Frits Bolkestein plaidant pour un Etat singulièrement allégé, Michel Rocard pour un Etat fort, réformé et juste. Les banderilles que l’un et l’autre se lancent sont à chaque fois l’occasion de dégager l’essence des grandes options politiques et dessinent un chemin possible vers la réforme. Les auteurs : Frits Bolkestein (néerlandais), après avoir travaillé à la compagnie Shell, se lance dans la politique en 1978. Successivement député libéral, ministre du Commerce extérieur et de la Défense, il devient commissaire européen en 1999, jusqu’en 2004. Il est aujourd’hui consultant pour divers organismes financiers et politiques. Michel Rocard, fondateur du PSU, père de la Nouvelle gauche, a été Premier ministre de François Mitterrand de 1988 à 1991. Il siège au Parlement européen depuis 1994. Il est l’auteur de nombreux ouvrages dont le très récent Si la gauche savait (Robert Laffont, 2005), un livre d’entretiens avec le journaliste Georges-Marc Benamou.

Bottomley, G. , and de Lepervanche M. 1984. Ethnicity, Class and Gender in Australia. London: George Allen & Unwin.

Bouchard Ryan, E., and Giles H. 1982. Attitudes towards Language Variation: Social and Applied Context: Edward Arnold.

Boudon, Raymond. 1998. Les dangers du communautarisme ou les effets pervers de la coopération.

analyse de l’ouvrage: Hardin, Russel. One for all: the logic of group conflict. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995. Le communautarise veut que les valeurs et la connaissance, loin de pouvoir prétendre à l’objectivité et à l’universalité, soient irrémédiab lement enkystées dans des dommunautés humaines concrètes. Cette philosophie doit son succès à ce qu’elle rend toutes égales et légitime par là les demandes des minorités ethniques et sociales. Cela dit, il est faux de supposer que ce besoin d’identification ne puisse se satisfaire que par un sentiment de rattachement à une communauté ethnique, culturelle ou nationale. On a tendance, depuis Rousseau, à idéaliser les “communautés”. En premier lieu, qui dit communaute dit ex clusion. dou l’importance qu’il y a pour une communaute a dispposer de signes d’identification: l’argot des banlieues résulte du besoin ressenti par les bandes de jeunes de disposer de symboles fiables et immédiatement lisibles permettant de distinguer ceux qui “en sont” de ceux qui n’en sont pas. Il est plus facile d’observer des effets de coordination spontanée lorsqu’il s’agit de défendre les intérêts d’une communauté (selon le modè’le dit du choix rationnel, rational choice model ou aussi parfois modèle de l’unilité espérée) que lorsqu’il s’agit d’appliquer des principes universels.

Bourdieu, P. 1981. Le Français chassé des sciences. Paris: CIREEL.

Bourdieu, Pierre, and Jean-Claude Passeron. 1970. La reproduction: Eléments pour une théorie du système d’enseignement. Paris: Les Editions de Minuit.

Bourmaud, P. (2008). “Une histoire de la Palestine : enjeux et périls : Recension de Gudrun Krämer, A History of Palestine. From the Ottoman conquest to the founding of the State of Israel, Princeton / Oxford, Princeton University Press, 2008.” la Vie des Idées.

cf.http://www.laviedesidees.fr/IMG/pdf/20080514_palestine.

Bouton, Charles. 1984. La Neurolinguistique, Que-Sais-Je? Paris: PUF.

Bouton, Charles. 1993. La Linguistique appliquée. 3ème ed. Vol. 1755, Que-Sais-Je? Paris: PUF.

Braibant, Guy. 1998. Le cinquantenaire de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme Personnalité juridique. Le Monde Interactif.

Si l’on se reporte aux discussions préparatoires de cet article, on constate que ceux qui l’ont adopté, dont René Cassin, avaient en tête plusieurs objectifs. D’abord la condamnation de l’esclavage, ainsi que de la ” mort civile “, qui correspondait à la suppression des droits civils à la suite d’une condamnation pénale et n’a disparu en France qu’en 1854 ; également l’affirmation du droit à une nationalité et l’attribution des mêmes droits civils aux étrangers qu’aux nationaux, d’où l’expression ” en tous lieux ” ; enfin la confirmation de l’égalité des sexes. Peu connu, obscur, inhabituel, l’article 6 serait-il le parent pauvre de la Déclaration, le raté de la famille ? On peut se demander si, au contraire, ce n’est pas une disposition essentielle, qui en résume en réalité beaucoup d’autres, dans un raccourci saisissant. La ” personnalité juridique ” se définit, en effet, comme l’aptitude de tout être humain à la qualité de sujet de droit, et non pas de simple objet, et à la jouissance d’un certain nombre de droits qualifiés de ” civils “. Ils se distinguent d’une part des droits ” politiques “, parfois aussi dénommés ” civiques ” parce qu’ils relèvent de la citoyenneté, tels que la liberté d’expression ou le droit de vote, et d’autre part des droits ” économiques, sociaux et culturels ” (éducation, travail, santé, sécurité sociale, par exemple). Certains de ces droits civils sont traditionnels : le nom, l’identité, le domicile, la nationalité, la famille, le mariage, le patrimoine, la passation des contrats ou l’action en justice devant les tribunaux nationaux, voire internationaux. D’autres sont plus récents ; groupés généralement sous le nom de ” droits de la personnalité “, ils ne se confondent pas avec la notion de ” personnalité juridique “, mais s’y rattachent nécessairement : droits à l’intégrité physique, avec le statut du corps humain, à l’intimité de la vie privée, à l’honneur, à l’image, à la voix, ou encore droits d’auteur. Tel est bien le sens de l’article 6. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre, de constater qu’une version du projet l’avait complété par la formule suivante : ” et jouit des droits civils fondamentaux “. Si celle-ci n’a pas été retenue, ce n’est pas parce qu’elle dénaturait le sens de l’article, mais parce qu’elle ne paraissait pas avoir d’équivalent en anglais. Ces droits civils des individus reconnus à tous et partout constituent le fondement de l’égalité civile, liée à l’abolition des privilèges et à l’interdiction des discriminations. Le droit à la reconnaissance de la personnalité juridique est donc une pièce essentielle de l’ensemble complexe des droits de l’homme. Il recouvre des libertés fondamentales, il est à la base de l’égalité civile ; il se trouve ainsi au confluent de la liberté et de l’égalité. Est-il inutile, comme l’ont cru les rédacteurs de la convention européenne des droits de l’homme, qui ne l’ont pas repris ? Certes non, à une époque où se multiplient les exclus : sans-papiers, sans domicile fixe, sans travail, sans ressources, sans famille, et demain, peut-être, sans droits. La ” personnalité juridique ” ne doit pas être une abstraction. Elle fait partie du ” noyau dur ” des droits de l’homme, à condition toutefois d’être mise en oeuvre concrètement, de sorte que ” chacun ” ait, ” en tous lieux “, la possibilité d’en profiter réellement. Les droits civils qu’elle garantit forment ainsi avec les droits politiques, économiques, sociaux et culturels, un ensembleindivisible. – G.B. Cinquantenaire de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme Retour Droits de reproduction et de diffusion réservés; © Le Monde 1998

Brash. 1981. Black English and the Mass Media. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

quoted by Rickford, J. R. (1998). The Creole Origins of African-American Vernacular English: Evidence from Copula Absence. African-American English: Structure, History and Use. S. S. Mufwene, J. R. Rickford, G. Bailey and B. John. London, Rootledge: 154-200.

Brass, Paul. (1974.), Language, religion and politics
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
— (1991), Ethnicity and nationalism: theory and comparison (Delhi: Sage).

Breton, Roland. 1995. Géographie Des Langues. 3ème ed. Vol. #1648, Coll. Que-Sais-je. Paris: PUF.

___(1996), Atlas of the languages and ethnic communities of South Asia. (Delhi: Sage).

Brezigar, B. (2010). From Maastricht to Lisbon – Development of language lesgislation in the EU Treaty. In Law, I. A. o. L. a. (ed.) 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law: “Language, Law and the Multilingual State”. Bloemfontein: Free StateUniversity.

my notes: Following the Lisbon treaty what has changed for minority languages?50 million of minority languages speakers in 15  members states. Only Malta has no minority languages. “General problem”Main parliament resulutions…quite a few. Budget line B3-1006, eblul et mercator.European CouncilArt. 22 charter of fundamental rights art. 151 Nice Treaty (Maastricht art 128)European Year of languages 2001Education Council Document 14 feb 2002. All european languages are equal in value and dignity from the cultural point and view and form an integral part of the European Community”Enlargement process Badinter commission copenhagen criteria yearly reports Laeken declaration
New Basic standards: general statements related to fundamental rightsart. 6 Lisbon Treaty:Charter of Fundamental rights became a binding documentPossiblity to access the European Court of Human rights Link with the Council of Europe related to human rights
RIGHTS OF PERSONS BELONGING TO MINORITIES
For the first time, the lisbon treaty in art. 2 mentions the rights of persons belonging to minorities. Yet the text is lower than Copenhagen criteria. There’s no specific definition of what’s a minority. These are still individual rights and it’s unclear how these principles could be implemented.

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY ART. 3: linguistic diversity becomes a common value and an Union objectives. The EU agrees that multilingual environment exists not only at the State level but WITHIN the state. There’s no distinction and officila and minority languages. No cultural and linguistic standardisation.
PROHIBITION OF DISCRIMINATION
ART. 2 OF Lisbon treaty and art. 21 of ??Art. 19 treaty of functioning of the EU: no mention of linguistics in the paragraph to combat discrimination based on sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation. There is no harmonozation.No-Discrimination on ground of language and Association with national languages.
languages of the treaty.Art. 55 Lisbon treaty,linguistic diversity common value. No equal rights for minority languages.
In practice, all languages are equal but english is more equal. Gateway to EU: translation will come soon for all documents when we really look for other languages.
EDUCATIONart. on education art. 165 lisbon treaty. cf. Maastricht treaty.
CULTURE No longer unanimity, qualified majority suffices
MINORITY LANGUAGES
ART. 16 OF european court of justice.
IN Greece in France, no recognition of minorities. No follow up of Copenhagen criteria, no more commissioner for multilingualism, no specific program for minority languages. No agency for linguistic diversity.
Questions from participants.  in belgium action by french speakers considering themselves a minority. Belgium hasn’t adopted the copenhagen criteria. the basis for the European Charter for the Minority Languages, that’s fine, but there is not such a thing as a minority in France. to designate an ethnic group in the french population. Why didnt’ the Treaty keep the basis of Languages and not of Minorities? Let’s not mix an Council of Europe instrument and the EU instruments! There are different definitions of minorities (immigrants for UK, in Slovenia it’s nationalities, in Spain regional minorities, in France it’s langues régionales). The situation is the same but the definitions differ.
article 55 of Lsbon Treaty: list of languages although the list isn’t exhaustive.intergovernmental conferences:

Brohy, C. (2010). Concluding remarks.  12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law: “Language, Law and the Multilingual State”Bloemfontein: Free StateUniversity.

My notes: English as a killer language…so I’ll switch to French!5 points
1) statistiques 36 présentations, 5 plénières, 3 langues de présentation et références à des centaines de langues que l’on a appelé de diverses façons. 2 languages: droit et linguistique et beaucoup de dialectes à l’intérieur de ces langages.
2) différentes méthodologies et typologies
3) l’ère du plurllinguisme est toujours plus verte dans le champ du voisin.
4) Elements comparatifs et thèmes différents: macro, qui nous a occupé le plus, chartes et conditions cadres, niveau mezzo entreprises et hopitaux, niveau micro, le public, les élèves….
5) Ce qui nous interpelle le plus est tout de même le niveau micro.Top Down et Bottom upcf. citizen initiative blog. speaking english has become necessary for international communication.

Très bonne cuvée 2010. Excellents échanges interdisciplinaires, cultures académiques et moments de convivialité.
Small World….

cf. Brohy, C. & K. Herberts (2010). symposium “Language policies and language surveys in bilingual municipalities”. Bilingualism and the city: measuring the quality of linguistic cohabitation in two bilingual towns in switzerland AND Finnish bilingualism like Heinz Ketchup – at least  57 varieties!). 12th International Conference of the International Academy of Linguistic Law: “Language, Law and the Multilingual State”. Bloemfontein: Free StateUniversity. cf. Caudine’s slides.comparison between the survey measuring the quality of linguistic cohabitation in two bilingual towns in Switzerland in 1986, 1998 and 2008. Problem: only three identical questions.Translation miteinander: 1986 plutôt ensemble, the other two surveys plutôt en bonne entente.Nebeneinander: 1986 plutôt ensemble, 1998 and 2008 plutôt en bonne entente.Gegeneinander: 1986 plutôt les les uns contre les autres. 1998 plutôt en opposition, 2008 plutôt de manière conflictuelle.in Finland 2008 43 bilingual municipalities, 21 minority language swidish, 22 minority language Finnish. cf. The report of the Government on the application of language legislation 2006. surveys are important tools for local democracy and governement. Should everything be bilingual? No, but you should provide service.
language policy is linked in a triangular scheme with language survey and language landscape.  English and russian are also more present on signage. signage for public sector 80% signs are bilingual. But in the private sector is much more sensitive to demand. So the relative size of the language minority has an impact on the latter. sample: inhabitants of the community of Biel/Bienne aged 18 and more.place of survey: community of  Biel/Bienne (people don’t necessarily live, but work in this municipality)survey mode: face to face
Period: july 14th-Aug.3d, 2008Sampling type: proportional quota samplingSize: 508 persons (298 german-, 134 french-speaking, 76 bilingual)Mandate: GFS Berneerror margin: +/-4.4%
Survey on multilingualism: the first were the Finns, the second were the Swiss.

Brohy, Claudine. 1997. Bilinguisme naissant ou bilinguisme évanescent? Enseignement plurilingue et interculturel en Suisse. Interdialogos 2:7-11.

L’enseignement bilingue en Valais. In: Matthey, Marinette (ed.): Les langues et leurs images. Neuchâtel: IRDP 1997, 193-199. Mehrsprachige und plurikulturelle Schulmodelle in der Schweiz oder: What’s in a name? In: Bulletin suisse de linguistique appliquée. VALS/ASLA 67, 1998, 85-99. (Zusammen mit Anne-Lore Bregy.)

Brohy, Claudine, and Anne-Lore Bregy. 1998. Mehrsprachige und plurikulturelle Schulmodelle in der Schweiz oder: What’s in a name? Bulletin suisse de linguistique appliquée. 2:85-99.

Brook, S. 1987. Maple Leaf Rag: Hamish Hamilton.

Brooke, James. 2000. Canada: Les Eglises ruinées par les Indiens? Courrier International (The New York Times), 9-15 novembre 2000, 22.

Seize mille Indiens Canadiens naguère maltraités dans des pensionnats attaquent les Eglises qui les géraient. Les dommage devraient se monter à plusieurs milliards de dollars – et entraîner de véritables faillites. (…) quatre actions collectives ont été entamées contre les Eglises et l’Etat, qui avaiet délégué à celles-ci la gesion des écoles dans les localités excentrées. Et des plaignants indiens ont déjà gagné chacun des cinq procès qu’ils ont intenté au cours des deux dernières années – deux dans le Saskatchewan et trois en Colombie-Britannique. Dans le Saskatchewan, où les procès étaient intentés à l’Etat et portaient sur des sévices sexuels, l’un des plaignants a gagné 82’000 dollars canadiens de dommage et intérêts et l’autre 174’000. Selon les audits de l’Eglise anglicane du Canada, les honoraires des avocats suffiront déjà à mettre celle-ci en faillite, et ce dès l’année prochaine. (…) Derrière les procès, il y a la souffrance bien réelle des nombreux Indiens canadiens qui avaient été enlevés à leur milieu et placés de force dans des écoles. A la fin du XIX ème siècle, l’Etat canadien s’était déchargé sur les Eglises établies d’une partie de ses obligations fédérales en matière d’éducation des Indiens: peu de fonctionnaires étaient disposés à aller travailler dans les régions excentrées. Les Eglises acceptèrent d’administrer un réseau de pensionnats qui, à son apogée, compta une centaine d’établissements. Dans le cadre de la politique d’assimilation forcée alors populaire en Amérique du Nord, on enlevait à leur famille les enfants dès l’âge de 5 ans pour les envoyer dans de lointains pensionnats. Là, on leur coupait les cheveux, on les habillait avec des uniformes et on leur interdisait de parler leur langue: “Comment fait-on parler anlgais à des petits de 6 ans qui ne parlent que sioux, lakota ou cree?” demande Anthoni Merchant, un avocat représentant environ 4000 plaignants. “En les punissant avec des méthodes de type Gestapo, on utilise des châtiments de plsu en plus barbares, sadiques”. Les pensionnats, où les parents n’avaient aucun droit de visite, devinrent parfois des endroits où les pédophiles s’en prenaient en toute impunité à des enfants désorientés et sans défense, accusent les Indiens. “Les pervers parcouraient tout l’Ouest, assure M. Merchant. Certains ont commis leur méfaits dans six ou sept écoles différentes”. Les avocats des Indiens sont persuadés que le jugement rendu en Colombie -Britannique à l’encontre du Diocèse de Cariboo fera jurisprudence dans tous le pays. Statuant dans cette affaire, la juge a estimé que l’Eglise anglicane encourait 60% de la responsabilité et l’Etat fédéral 40%. Les Eglises protestent, mettant en avant le fait qu’elles ont mis fin à leur engagement dans les écoles vers 1970, que l’Etat fédéral en a alors repris la responsabilité et n’a fermé le dernier établissement qu’une vingtaine d’années plus tard. Les anglicans rappellent qu ele primat de leur Eglise, l’archevêque Michael Peers, a demandé pardon aux Indiens dès 1993 pour les sévices encoursu, tandis que le gouvernement canadien a attendu cinq ans pour en faire autant. Devant la nécessité de vendre des lieux de cultes, des presbytères, des foyers d’accueil pour femmes ou des soupes populaires, les Eglises demandent une médiation extérieure pour règler les litiges hors des tribuneaux. Elles estiment que l’Etat devrait assurer la majeure partie des débours et apellent à la constitution d’une commission d’enquête sur le modèle de la Commission vérité et réconciliation de l’Afrique post-apartheid.

Brooks, Roy L. 1996. Integration or Separation: A Strategy for Racial Equality. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.

Broome, R. 1994. Aboriginal Australians: Black Responses to White Dominance 1788-1994. St Leonards NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Brown, Dan. 2001. Angels and Demons. paperback 2nd ed. New York.

English is the language of international communication (cf reference to CERN's scientist's nationalitie)...although Robert Langdon thought it was maths.
In the Vatican, the 3 languages of communication were Italian, Spanish and English.

Brown, Jennifer, and C. Roderick Wilson. 1986. The Northern Algonquians: a regional overview. In Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience, edited by B. Morrison and W. R. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.

Brownlie, Ian. 1988. The Rights of Peoples In Modern International Law. In The Rights of Peoples, edited by J. Crawford. Oxford: Clarendon Press: 1-16.

2:(…)Alors que la Règle de Droit, dans sa forme classique, impliquait un modèle statique d’égalité devant la loi, avec un accent particulier porté à la justice procédurale et sur les droits civiques, le concept des droits de l’homme a été au moins autant, sinon plus, concerné par un accès équitable à la richesse et à l’éducation. Un tel changement de contenu s’est manifesté par l’apparition d’une convention (covenant) Internationale sur les Droits Economiques, sociaux et Culturels à la Convention Internationale sur les Droits Civiques et Politiques de 1966 de la Charte des Nations Unies.

Bruckner, Pascal. 1994. Le vertige de Babel, cosmopolitisme ou mondialisme. Paris: Arléa.

Brutt-Griffler, Janina. 2003. World English: A study of its development. Journal Language Policy 3 (October, 2003).

citée par Seidlhofer, Barbara. 2002. Autour du concept d’anglais international: de l'”anglais authentique” à l'”anglais réaliste”? Strasbourg: Conseil de l’Europe, Division des politiques linguistiques, DG IV- Direction de l’Education scolaire, extrascolaire et de l’enseignement supérieur. p. 110 4 traits fondamentaux du développement d’une langue globale: 1) fonction économico-culturelle de la langue (l’anglais mondial est issu du développement d’un marché mondial et d’évolutions globales dans les domaines de la science, de la technologie , de la culture et des médias); 2)dépassement du rôle de lingua franca réservée aux élite (l’anglais mondial est appris à diffréents niveaux de la société et non unitquement par l’élite économique; 3) stabilisaiton du bilinguisme par la coexistence d’une langue mondiale avec d’autres langues dans des contextes du bilinguisme/multilinguisme (L’anglais mondial tend à s’établir parallèlement aux langues locales pltôt qu’à les remplacer; il contribue donc au multilinguisme plus qu’il ne le met en péril) 4) modification de la langue via les processus de convergence et de divergence linguistique (c’est avant tout parce que de nombreuses personnes apprennent l’anglais que l’anglais mondial s’étend et non parce que des anglophones émigrent vers d’autres territoires; on observe donc deux évolutions parallèles: création de nouvelles variétés et maintien de l’unité de la langue mondial

Bryson, Bethany. 1999. Multiculturalism as a moving moral boundary: literature professors redefine racism. In The Cultural Territories of Race: Black and White Boundaries, edited by M. Lamont. University of Chicago Press.

221: The movement known as Afrocentrism -an intellectual movement that has grown in the nation’s universites and a pedagogical reform movement that thas taken place in many of the United States predominantly black public school systems – it is a philosophy based on an essentialist conception of race that posits the cultural, behavioral and lifestyle unity of all decendants of Africa, no matter where they have ended up following the black Diaspora. 222:In Winant’s (Winant, H. (1994). Racial Conditions. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press.) terms, Afrocentrism is a “racial project” insofar as it is an interpretation, representation, or explanation of racial dynamics and, at the same time, an effort to change the organization and distribution of resources along racial lilnes, in this case educational resources. Yet Afrocentrism has not attracted overwhelming support amoung the majority of African-Americans and, in fact, has proved divisive (…) Afrocentrism 227: Introduced in the early 1980s by Molefi Kewte Asante of Temple University, Afrocentrism has grown in black studies program at universities around the nation as Maulana Karenga, Tsheloane Keto, Asa Hilliard III, John Henrik Clarke, Leonard Jeffries, and others have pursued both the intellectual bases of the project as welll as its infusion into college, high-school, and elementary school curricula. The intellectual project of Afrocentrism is to “study African peoples from an Africa-centered prism”. (…)Afrocentrism recognizes no division between the African past and the African-American history, and regards as “ahistorical” and “mythical” any social science tht does not trace these continuous African Roots. So, if, for example, a scholar sets out to study “Africans in the inner cities of the Northeast United States, it must be done with the idea in the back of the mind that one is studying African people, not “made-in-America Negroes” without historical depth” (Asante, M. K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge. Trenton, N.J., Africa World Press: 15). Welsh-Asante (cited in Asante, M. K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge. Trenton, N.J., Africa World Press), for example, argues that there is an African Aesthetic, which is “based on seven “senses” shared by all Africa-descended people around the globe: polyrhythm, polycentrism, dimensional, repetitia, curvilinear, epic memory and wholism” (Asante, M. K. (1990). Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge. Trenton, N.J., Africa World Press: 12), At thîts most controversia (and may Arocentric scholars themselves reject such notions), this conception of race includes suggestions about personality based on melanin content and other genetic hardwiring). Afrocentrism versus Multiculturalism 229: Contrasted with Afrocentrism is multiculturalism, a movement whose exact definition is impossible to specify. 230: As the “antithesis” of Eurocentrism, Afrocentrism replaces multiculturalists’ emphasis on pluralism and all cultures’ interdependence, and stresses instead the uniqueness of African peoples, the impact of Sfricans on world civilization, and proposes that the ultimate “other” to white hegemony is Africanity. Afrocentrism mission is felt to be revolutionary and, as such, is irreconciliable with the conventionally pluralist claims of multiculturalism.

Buchanan, Allen. 1991. Secession: The Legitimacy of Political Divorce. Boulder: Westview Press.

Buckskin, P. and L. O’Brien (2011). From Policy to Praxis, the time for talking is over. World Conference on the Education of the Indigenous People (WIPCE 2011). Cusco, Peru.

Starts by Lewis O’Bryanrecognizing the People of Cusco.
And Buckskin’s blessings from his country.
¨Prof of education and research of U of Southern Australia. How we are embedding indigenous knowledges across disciplins. Scratches more than the surface. Urgency around embedding indigenous knoledge in all sectors of education. We need to capture the space.
defines praxis and policy. the time for talking is over.
Adelaide based.Communities in the north of South Australia where they have intergenerational language speakers. because of isolation in desert country, they’ve been able to keep all their traditions alive and isolation from white man. Anangu people. The European named, saw and claimed. Indigenous people informs and sustains. multidimentional bodies of understandings. Ownership of the knowledge means ownership of the country. Way of looking at the world. “I am one voice, the voices of my ancestors come from a circule of peoples, the first circle of humanity to form. Their voices were one when spoken in unison. The circle of people embraced the voices. They sang the song, repeating the process over and over. That was the law.
There is a need for “a critical mass of indigenous intellectual, cognisant of western philosophies but powerfully critical from within Indigenous philosophies, is desperately needed to critique our own “progression ” in the academy…and to further clarify an indigenous knowledge and ontological position (Arbon, V. 2008: 63-4)
Need for more indigenous scholar in the academy. Only the further growth of our scholar can garantee challenging the mainstream way of thinking.
Two areas of engagement: continued support of abo knowledge. Growing trend to include indigenous knowledges. Senior academic position filled by abos.
Elders appointed, such as Uncle Lewis O’Brien, a Kaurna Elder and an adjunct research fellow within the David Unaipon College of Indigenous Education and Research, has recently won one of the most prestigious research grants to research Indigenous knowledges to fight wild fires. importance of developing polices garanteeing that they do more than paying lip services to the abo perspectives. Active involvement of indigenous people is key to this success. We still don’t have the critical mass of abo academics although it’s work in progress.

Bullock , A., and O. Stallybrass, eds. 1977. The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought. London: Fontana Books.

Bunge, Robert. 1992. Language: the Psyche of a People. In Language Loyalties: A source-book on the Official English Controversy, edited by J. Crawford. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Burch, Ernest S. 1986. The Eskaleuts: a regional overview. In Native Peoples: the Canadian Experience, edited by B. Morrison and W. R. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart.

Bureau, of Immigration and Population Research. 1994. Australia’s Population Trends and Propects 1993. Canberra,: Australian Government Publishing Service.

Burnaby, B. 1982. Language in Education among Canada’s Native Peoples. Toronto: OISE Press.

Burnaby, B., ed. 1985. Promoting Native Writing Systems in Canada. Toronto: OISE Press.

Burnaby, B., and A. Cumming, eds. 1992. Socio-political Aspects of ESL in Canada. Toronto: OISE Press.

Burnet, Jean. (1975), ‘Multiculturalism, immigration, and racism’, Canadian Ethnic Studies, 1 (7), 35-39.

Butler, J. (ed.), (1987.), Democratic liberalism in South Africa: its history and prospect. (Middletown Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press).

Burridge, Kate, Lois Foster, and Gerry Turcotte. 1997. Canada-Australia: Towards a Second Century of Partnership, International Council of Canadian Studies: Carleton University Press.

Bustamante, Jorge. 1989. Fronteras Mexico-Estados Unidos: reflexiones para un marco teorico. Frontera Norte:7-24.

Butlin, N.G., Barnard A., and J.J. Pincus. 1982. Government and Capitalism. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Bybee, Keith J. 1998. Mistaken Identity: The Supreme Court and the Politics of Minority Representation. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Byrdsong, Michael D. 1994. The question of the “N” word: the when, the why the who, and the what”. The City College: The City University of New York term paper for course on African-American English.

14 thoughts on “Bibliography with a B like Benjamin Barber

  1. You actually make it seem so easy along with your presentation but I to find this topic to be actually one thing that I think I might by no means understand. It kind of feels too complex and very extensive for me. I’m having a look ahead on your subsequent publish, I’ll attempt to get the hold of it!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: