First of all, this is an invitation to attend the//
Ceci est une invitation à la Conférence David Chemla 11 avril 2011 à 20h à Ma.Com (Genève)

You may remember some of my previous postings in April 2010 and June 2010 on this topic, inviting you to give your opinion on this call….The following paper was published in the JCall Newsletter I received on March 7th, 2011.

I happen to share these views but find they have a much more interesting angle coming from a Political science Professor from the European Institute of the University of Geneva, Prof. René Schwok (holder of the Jean Monnet Chair).than from a mere sociolinguist.

(Le texte français se trouve sous l’anglais)

Can Jews of the Diaspora criticize sovereign decisions taken by a democratic state
of which they are not the citizens?

René Schwok, Professor of  Political Science / International Relations at  the University
of Geneva, Switzerland .

I often meet Jews who in private admit they are offended by the settlement policy in the West Bank, in East Jerusalem and in the Golan. Nevertheless, they do not want to criticize Israel openly. They consider that they should respect Israeli sovereignty because they are not citizens of Israel, which, moreover, is the only democracy in the Middle-East.

Their questioning must be taken seriously, and, above all, answered, for once, with precision.

The first question is about citizenship. Many Jews hesitate to question Israeli sovereignty openly because Israel remains, in 2011, the only democracy in the Middle-East. This stand is highly respectable, but misused and distorted.

The issue is not about « democracy », but really about « sovereignty », because the settlement policy is not implemented within Israeli borders, i.e. beyond the limits of Israeli sovereignty. Surely, sovereignty and respect thereof only apply to policies implemented within the borders of a State, be it democratic.

Therefore, this does not apply to the settlements in the West Bank because they are built beyond the internationally recognized borders of Israel.

International law  is clear
Uncertainty has nevertheless instilled on the « international nature » of these territories. Since Israel has annexed East Jerusalem and extended its national law to the Golan, some people consider that these territories are not international anymore. As to the West Bank, they describe it as “disputed territory”.

However, such considerations have no relevance in international law. Since 1967, the United Nations Security Council, the International Court of Justice in The Hague, as well as all members of the international community, including the United States governments, have repeatedly stated that the lands captured during the Six-Day War do not belong to Israel.

Another fact is also often neglected. All Israeli governments, including Netanyahu’s, have accepted Security Council resolutions 242, 338 and 1397, all of which establish that these territories were occupied in 1967 and do not belong to Israel.

The most recent significant document is the « Road map » adopted in 2003. It indicates that the final agreement “puts an end to the occupation which began in 1967”. The Sharon administration opposed certain parts of this document but did not question this sentence.

There are, admittedly, a handful of hawkish Israeli jurists who consider that these territories do not belong to the Palestinians nor to the Arabs. However, not even they ever claimed these territories fall under Israeli sovereignty according to international law.

To sum up, claims regarding Israeli sovereignty over East Jerusalem, the West Bank and the Golan have no legal basis, according to international law. Therefore, anyone, including Jews of the Diaspora, is free to publicly express their views on what is happening there.

Questioning the  legitimacy of international law
In fact, many Jews of the Diaspora possibly question the legitimacy of international law more than its legality. I understand them very well, as I share their doubts myself. International law is indeed determined by power struggles between states. Moreover, it often stems from majorities dominated by dictatorships which should not teach lessons about democracy or human rights. The ridiculous displays at the Human Rights Council in Geneva are symbolic in this respect.

Is this enough, however, to deprive all of international law of any legitimacy? Must we throw out the baby with the bath water? This is, in any case, the settlement proponents view. They hope to silence critics by delegitimizing totally international law.

They are forgetting, however, that Israeli governments themselves legitimized international law when they ratified treaties in a sovereign and democratic way.

Besides, funnily enough, the very ones who reject international law haven’t recently stopped repeating that « Egypt must respect its peace treaty with Israel ». There can be no better illustration of the dangers incurred by totally delegitimizing international law.

In fact they are playing against their own side without realizing it, because without international law, the very legitimacy of the State of Israel would be called into question and, above all, even its right to defend its sovereignty could be disputed.

I have also recently heard a new argument in favor of continuing the settlement activity. The rationale is as follows: since Palestinian negotiators have accepted in secret negotiations that « large blocks of settlements » and Jewish neighborhoods of East Jerusalem would ultimately be left to Israel, building new settlements there is acceptable. Palestinians are even described as hypocrites when they are offended by the building activity in these very areas which they would agree to part with.

Without going into long legal and moral considerations, it is obvious that the proponents of this argument are once again playing against their own side. Indeed, the Palestinians could, on their part, claim that Israeli diplomats were ready to make concessions during the aborted negotiations. What would these pro-Israel hawks say if 100 000 Palestinian « refugees » settled in Israel because Olmert and Livni have considered it in 2008?

In conclusion, I understand perfectly Diaspora Jews’ reluctance to question Israeli sovereignty since they are not citizens of Israel, which is a democratic state. Yet this argument is only valid within this country’s internationally recognized borders. It is a fact that the settlements are built outside Israeli sovereignty; international law is indisputable on this matter.

Whatever partially understandable doubts about international law one can have, the fact remains that a total deligitimization of international law would in the end lead to a delegitimization of the State of Israel, of its right to defend its sovereignty and to enforce its international agreements, especially with Egypt.

Therefore, all citizens of the world, including Jews of the Diaspora, have the right to publicly express their opinion on the situation in East Jerusalem, in the West Bank and in the Golan. Due respect to the only democracy in the Middle-East simply stops at the borders of its sovereignty.

René Schwok, February 2010

VERSION FRANCAISE……FRANCAIS……FRENCH


Vous vous souvenez peut-être de mes éditos d’Avril 2010 et Juin 2010 à ce propos, vous invitant à donner votre opinion sur cet appel….L’article ci-dessous a été publié dans la  JCall Newsletter reçue ce jour, le 7 mars 2011.

ll se trouve que je partage ces vues mais que l’angle pris par un professeur en Science Po de l’Institut Européen de l’Université de Genève et titulaire de la Chaire Jean Monnet, le Prof. René Schwok. est bien plus pertinent que le mien, pauvre sociolinguiste;-)

Les Juifs de Diaspora peuvent-ils critiquer les décisions souveraines
d’un Etat démocratique dont ils ne sont pas citoyens ?

par René Schwok, professeur de Sciences Politiques et de Relations Internationales à l’Université de Genève. Signataire de JCall Suisse

Je rencontre souvent des Juifs qui s’offusquent en privé de la poursuite des implantations/colonies en Cisjordanie, à Jérusalem-Est et sur le Golan. Pourtant, ils ne veulent pas critiquer Israël sur la place publique. Ils considèrent que, n’étant pas des citoyens de cet Etat, ils se doivent de respecter la souveraineté de ce pays, de surcroît la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient.

Il est nécessaire de prendre au sérieux ces interrogations et, surtout, pour une fois, d’y répondre avec précision.

Le premier doute concerne la citoyenneté. De nombreux Juifs hésitent à remettre en cause ouvertement la souveraineté de l’Etat qui reste, même en ce début 2011, la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient. Un tel souci est plus que respectable. Il repose cependant sur une manipulation argumentative.

Le problème ne se situe pas autour de la notion de « démocratie », mais bien autour de celle de « souveraineté ». En effet, les implantations/colonies ne se situent tout simplement pas sur le territoire israélien. Elles ne font pas parties de la souveraineté de ce pays.

Ainsi, s’il faut respecter les décisions souveraines d’un Etat démocratique, la condition est que celles-ci s’exercent à l’intérieur de ses propres frontières. Mais, dans le cas de constructions en-dehors du territoire israélien de 1967, on se situe dans une zone extérieure à la souveraineté israélienne.

Le droit international public est clair
Le doute s’est pourtant instillé sur le « caractère international » de ces trois territoires. Israël ayant annexé Jérusalem-Est et étendu son droit national au Golan, certains considèrent que ces territoires ne seraient plus internationaux. Quant à la Cisjordanie, ils la qualifient de « territoires contestés ».

De telles considérations n’ont cependant aucune pertinence en droit international public. Depuis 1967, le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies, la Cour internationale de justice de la Haye, ainsi que tous les gouvernements du monde, y compris celui des Etats-Unis, ne cessent de répéter que les territoires conquis par Israël lors de la Guerre des six jours ne lui appartiennent pas.

Un autre fait est aussi souvent occulté. Tous les gouvernements israéliens, y compris celui de Netanyahou, ont accepté les résolutions 242, 338 et 1397 du Conseil de Sécurité qui, toutes, rappellent que ces territoires ont été occupés en 1967 et qu’ils ne lui appartiennent pas.

Le dernier texte significatif en date est la « Feuille de route » adoptée en 2003. Dans celle-ci, il est écrit que l’accord final « met fin à l’occupation qui a commencé en 1967 ». Le gouvernement Sharon avait certes contesté certains points de ce document. Mais il n’avait jamais remis en cause cette phrase.

On trouve certes une poignée de juristes israéliens faucons qui considèrent que ces trois territoires n’appartiennent pas non plus aux Palestiniens ou aux Arabes. Mais ils n’ont jamais osé prétendre qu’ils faisaient parties de la souveraineté israélienne en regard du droit international public.

Ainsi, en droit international public, l’absence de la légalité d’une quelconque prétention de souveraineté israélienne sur Jérusalem-Est, la Cisjordanie et le Golan est incontestable. Ce qui autorise tout citoyen du monde, y compris les Juifs de Diaspora, à s’exprimer publiquement sur ces territoires.

Doutes sur  la légitimité du droit international public
Au fond, peut-être que de nombreux Juifs de Diaspora éprouvent davantage de doutes sur la légitimité du droit international que sur sa légalité. Je les comprends bien car je les partage aussi. Le droit international est effectivement le reflet des rapports de force entre puissances internationales. De plus, il est souvent issu de majorités où dominent des Etats dictatoriaux qui n’ont aucune leçon à donner en matière de démocratie et de droits de l’homme. Les pitreries du Conseil des droits de l’homme à Genève sont à cet égard emblématiques.

Cette illégitimité partielle du droit international le disqualifie-t-il pourtant totalement ? Faut-il jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain ? Tel est l’avis des partisans de la colonisation. En délégitimant totalement le droit international, ils espèrent pouvoir faire taire les critiques.

Ils oublient cependant que ce sont les gouvernements israéliens qui ont légitimé le droit international en ratifiant des traités de manière souveraine et démocratique.

Il est d’ailleurs cocasse d’observer ces derniers temps tous ces pourfendeurs du droit international qui n’ont à la bouche que la phrase : « il faut que l’Egypte respecte son Traité de paix avec Israël ». Quelle meilleure illustration des dangers encourus à déligitimer totalement le droit international.

Pourtant, ils marquent un but contre leur propre camp et ils n’ont pas l’air d’en avoir conscience. En effet, sans droit international, c’est toute la légitimité de l’Etat d’Israël qui est remise en cause. C’est surtout son droit à justement défendre sa souveraineté qui serait contesté.

J’entends enfin, depuis peu, un nouvel argument en faveur de la poursuite des « implantations/colonies ». Le raisonnement est le suivant : puisque des négociateurs palestiniens ont admis dans des négociations secrètes que les « grands blocs de colonies » et les quartiers juifs de Jérusalem-Est seraient, in fine, laissés à Israël, on peut construire dans ces enceintes. Les Palestiniens sont même qualifiés d’hypocrites quand ils s’offusquent que l’on bâtisse dans ces territoires précis alors qu’ils seraient prêts à les céder.

Sans rentrer dans des considérations juridiques et morales trop longues, il est évident que les partisans d’un tel raisonnement marquent un nouveau but contre leur propre camp. En effet, les Palestiniens pourraient, de leur côté, revendiquer les concessions que les diplomates israéliens étaient prêts à faire dans ces négociations avortées : que diraient ces mêmes faucons pro-israéliens si 100 000 « réfugiés » palestiniens s’installaient en Israël car Olmert et Livni y en avaient fait mention en 2008 ?

En conclusion, je comprends parfaitement les scrupules des Juifs de Diaspora à remettre en cause la souveraineté de l’Etat d’Israël car ils ne sont pas ressortissants de cet Etat, qui est de surcroît fondamentalement démocratique. Mais cet argument n’est valable qu’à l’intérieur des frontières de ce pays. Les implantations/colonies sont construites en dehors de sa souveraineté! Le droit international est incontestable à ce sujet.

Quels que puissent être les doutes partiellement compréhensibles que l’on puisse avoir par rapport au droit international, il reste qu’une totale délégitimation du droit international aboutirait surtout à la délégitimation de l’Etat d’Israël, de son droit à défendre sa souveraineté et à faire respecter ses accords internationaux, surtout avec l’Egypte.

Par conséquent, tous les citoyens du monde, y compris les Juifs de Diaspora, ont le droit de s’exprimer publiquement sur la situation régnant à Jérusalem-Est, en Cisjordanie et sur le Golan. Le respect dû à la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient s’arrête tout simplement aux limites de sa souveraineté.

René Schwok, Février 2010Les Juifs de Diaspora peuvent-ils critiquer les décisions souveraines
d’un Etat démocratique dont ils ne sont pas citoyens ?

par René Schwok, professeur de Sciences Politiques et de Relations Internationales
à l’Université de Genève. Signataire de JCall Suisse

Je rencontre souvent des Juifs qui s’offusquent en privé de la poursuite des implantations/colonies en Cisjordanie, à Jérusalem-Est et sur le Golan. Pourtant, ils ne veulent pas critiquer Israël sur la place publique. Ils considèrent que, n’étant pas des citoyens de cet Etat, ils se doivent de respecter la souveraineté de ce pays, de surcroît la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient.

Il est nécessaire de prendre au sérieux ces interrogations et, surtout, pour une fois, d’y répondre avec précision.

Le premier doute concerne la citoyenneté. De nombreux Juifs hésitent à remettre en cause ouvertement la souveraineté de l’Etat qui reste, même en ce début 2011, la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient. Un tel souci est plus que respectable. Il repose cependant sur une manipulation argumentative.

Le problème ne se situe pas autour de la notion de « démocratie », mais bien autour de celle de « souveraineté ». En effet, les implantations/colonies ne se situent tout simplement pas sur le territoire israélien. Elles ne font pas parties de la souveraineté de ce pays.

Ainsi, s’il faut respecter les décisions souveraines d’un Etat démocratique, la condition est que celles-ci s’exercent à l’intérieur de ses propres frontières. Mais, dans le cas de constructions en-dehors du territoire israélien de 1967, on se situe dans une zone extérieure à la souveraineté israélienne.

Le droit international public est clair
Le doute s’est pourtant instillé sur le « caractère international » de ces trois territoires. Israël ayant annexé Jérusalem-Est et étendu son droit national au Golan, certains considèrent que ces territoires ne seraient plus internationaux. Quant à la Cisjordanie, ils la qualifient de « territoires contestés ».

De telles considérations n’ont cependant aucune pertinence en droit international public. Depuis 1967, le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies, la Cour internationale de justice de la Haye, ainsi que tous les gouvernements du monde, y compris celui des Etats-Unis, ne cessent de répéter que les territoires conquis par Israël lors de la Guerre des six jours ne lui appartiennent pas.

Un autre fait est aussi souvent occulté. Tous les gouvernements israéliens, y compris celui de Netanyahou, ont accepté les résolutions 242, 338 et 1397 du Conseil de Sécurité qui, toutes, rappellent que ces territoires ont été occupés en 1967 et qu’ils ne lui appartiennent pas.

Le dernier texte significatif en date est la « Feuille de route » adoptée en 2003. Dans celle-ci, il est écrit que l’accord final « met fin à l’occupation qui a commencé en 1967 ». Le gouvernement Sharon avait certes contesté certains points de ce document. Mais il n’avait jamais remis en cause cette phrase.

On trouve certes une poignée de juristes israéliens faucons qui considèrent que ces trois territoires n’appartiennent pas non plus aux Palestiniens ou aux Arabes. Mais ils n’ont jamais osé prétendre qu’ils faisaient parties de la souveraineté israélienne en regard du droit international public.

Ainsi, en droit international public, l’absence de la légalité d’une quelconque prétention de souveraineté israélienne sur Jérusalem-Est, la Cisjordanie et le Golan est incontestable. Ce qui autorise tout citoyen du monde, y compris les Juifs de Diaspora, à s’exprimer publiquement sur ces territoires.

Doutes sur  la légitimité du droit international public
Au fond, peut-être que de nombreux Juifs de Diaspora éprouvent davantage de doutes sur la légitimité du droit international que sur sa légalité. Je les comprends bien car je les partage aussi. Le droit international est effectivement le reflet des rapports de force entre puissances internationales. De plus, il est souvent issu de majorités où dominent des Etats dictatoriaux qui n’ont aucune leçon à donner en matière de démocratie et de droits de l’homme. Les pitreries du Conseil des droits de l’homme à Genève sont à cet égard emblématiques.

Cette illégitimité partielle du droit international le disqualifie-t-il pourtant totalement ? Faut-il jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain ? Tel est l’avis des partisans de la colonisation. En délégitimant totalement le droit international, ils espèrent pouvoir faire taire les critiques.

Ils oublient cependant que ce sont les gouvernements israéliens qui ont légitimé le droit international en ratifiant des traités de manière souveraine et démocratique.

Il est d’ailleurs cocasse d’observer ces derniers temps tous ces pourfendeurs du droit international qui n’ont à la bouche que la phrase : « il faut que l’Egypte respecte son Traité de paix avec Israël ». Quelle meilleure illustration des dangers encourus à déligitimer totalement le droit international.

Pourtant, ils marquent un but contre leur propre camp et ils n’ont pas l’air d’en avoir conscience. En effet, sans droit international, c’est toute la légitimité de l’Etat d’Israël qui est remise en cause. C’est surtout son droit à justement défendre sa souveraineté qui serait contesté.

J’entends enfin, depuis peu, un nouvel argument en faveur de la poursuite des « implantations/colonies ». Le raisonnement est le suivant : puisque des négociateurs palestiniens ont admis dans des négociations secrètes que les « grands blocs de colonies » et les quartiers juifs de Jérusalem-Est seraient, in fine, laissés à Israël, on peut construire dans ces enceintes. Les Palestiniens sont même qualifiés d’hypocrites quand ils s’offusquent que l’on bâtisse dans ces territoires précis alors qu’ils seraient prêts à les céder.

Sans rentrer dans des considérations juridiques et morales trop longues, il est évident que les partisans d’un tel raisonnement marquent un nouveau but contre leur propre camp. En effet, les Palestiniens pourraient, de leur côté, revendiquer les concessions que les diplomates israéliens étaient prêts à faire dans ces négociations avortées : que diraient ces mêmes faucons pro-israéliens si 100 000 « réfugiés » palestiniens s’installaient en Israël car Olmert et Livni y en avaient fait mention en 2008 ?

En conclusion, je comprends parfaitement les scrupules des Juifs de Diaspora à remettre en cause la souveraineté de l’Etat d’Israël car ils ne sont pas ressortissants de cet Etat, qui est de surcroît fondamentalement démocratique. Mais cet argument n’est valable qu’à l’intérieur des frontières de ce pays. Les implantations/colonies sont construites en dehors de sa souveraineté! Le droit international est incontestable à ce sujet.

Quels que puissent être les doutes partiellement compréhensibles que l’on puisse avoir par rapport au droit international, il reste qu’une totale délégitimation du droit international aboutirait surtout à la délégitimation de l’Etat d’Israël, de son droit à défendre sa souveraineté et à faire respecter ses accords internationaux, surtout avec l’Egypte.

Par conséquent, tous les citoyens du monde, y compris les Juifs de Diaspora, ont le droit de s’exprimer publiquement sur la situation régnant à Jérusalem-Est, en Cisjordanie et sur le Golan. Le respect dû à la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient s’arrête tout simplement aux limites de sa souveraineté.

René Schwok, Février 2010

Background info on JCall and follow up.

JCall was created on the JStreet principle. However, where JCall acts as a lobby towards Congressmen, JCall simply aims at providing a different view which could be summerized in “Nous ne sommes pas des Juifs honteux, nous sommes des Juifs critiques” (We are no shameful Jews, we are critical Jews”.

We hope to shortly create a formal organisation in Switzerland with specific aims such as mobilizing our countries on the Middle-East. JCall already exists in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and France.

Today, 7788 people have signed the petition also called “Call to Reason”. Here are some exerpts from the 272 Swiss signatories:
“Je trouve cet appel très à propos et équilibré”
“C’est avec grande gratitude, que je signe votre Appel à la raison. “,
“Bravo pour votre initiative les personnes de bonne volonté”
“Je souffre depuis longtemps du silence…”
“Que notre fervent désir de paix au Moyen-Orient puisse agir comme un pont lumineux…”
“Zog nisht keyn mal”
“Sûr qu’il est urgent de créer 2 Etats et surtout affaiblir ces partis religieux qui rêvent d’un Grand Israël”
“Trop longtemps que ça dure, “deux Peuples, deux Etats” est la seule issue envisageable”
“Je soutiens de toutes mes forces et de tout mon coeur. BRAVO ET COURAGE”
“Je me réjouis de cette initiative venant d’intellect.”
“Merci pour cette initiative. Il est plus que temps!”
“Voilà une bien belle initiative, qui fait du bien”
“Bravo je souscris entièrement à  cet appel”
“Il est important de faire également entendre cette voix”
“Après avoir été oppressés pendant des siècles devenir oppresseur n’est pas la vocation de notre Peuple”
“Better late than never ”
” The voice of reason calls for the survival of Israel”
” Very good call to try to ask for some objectivity in this matter! It’s high time! ”
“About time…”
“Parce que cela ne peut pas continuer ainsi… “etc….

Cela vous intéresse? Conférence David Chemla 11 avril 2011 à 20h à Ma.Com (Genève)

Vous voulez en savoir ENCORE plus, voici le lien pour le dossier de presse de La Paix Maintenant